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GNOME 3.32 Released

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.32 Released

    The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.32 contains six months of work by the GNOME community and includes many improvements, performance improvements and new features.

    This release features a refreshed visual style ranging from an entirely new set of app icons to improvements to the user interface style. Many of the base style colors have been saturated, giving them a more vivid, vibrant appearance. Buttons are more rounded and have a softer “shadow” border. Switches no longer use the explicit ON and OFF text, instead using color to indicate state.

  • The Faster & More Beautiful GNOME 3.32 Has Been Released

    GNOME 3.32, which is codenamed "Taipei" given the location of GNOME.Asia Summit 2018, has been officially released on time.

    The GNOME folks have officially announced 3.32 as the latest version of the GNOME 3 stack.

    From this morning you can see our favorite changes and new features of GNOME 3.32... The biggest highlights are fractional scaling support, performance improvements, and a lot of bug fixing.

  • GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Six months in development, the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment is finally here to upgrade your GNOME experience to the next level by adding lots of new features, fixing bugs from previous versions, improving existing components and apps, as well as polishing the look and feel of the user interface.

    With the GNOME 3.32 release, the GNOME desktop becomes flatter, lighter, and more modern. After upgrading, users will notice that the App Menus are no longer available and their content was moved to other places, there are changes to the buttons, header bars, and switches, as well as more consistent colors and new app icons.

GNOME 3.32 Released, This is What’s New

  • GNOME 3.32 Released, This is What’s New

    GNOME 3.32, out today, brings a crop of new features and enhancements to the Linux desktop.

    The update includes a new icon set and theme refresh, rolls in a bunch of (much needed) performance patches, and includes new versions of core apps, like the Nautilus file manager.

    In all, it’s a major upgrade. And, as this is the world’s most popular free, open-source desktop environment, a major upgrade of the GNOME desktop is major news to its millions of users.

    There’s plenty more to learn about, so join us as we take a look at the best new features of GNOME 3.32.

Brian Fagioli the Latest to Cover the GNOME Release

  • GNOME 3.32 'Taipei' is finally here! The best Linux desktop environment gets even better

    Whether or not a desktop environment is "best" is subjective. In other words, not all people prefer the same DE. Some folks like GNOME, others are KDE Plasma fans, and some Linux users choose something else. With that said, GNOME is the best. It is not debatable -- please accept this fact. GNOME simply offers the most sensical user interface while also being beautiful. Look, when Canonical killed the much-maligned Unity, what DE was chosen as the new default DE for Ubuntu? Exactly -- GNOME. Hell, GNOME bests both macOS and Windows 10 too.

    Today, the best gets even better as GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" is finally here! The DE finally gets one of the most desired features -- fractional scaling. While technically just experimental for now, it will allow users to better scale their desktops when using a HiDPI monitor. Speaking of appearances, GNOME finally gets refreshed icons, and yes, that matters. They look amazing and modern. Also cool? The on-screen keyboard has an emoji picker! User images are now all circular too, lending to a more cohesive and consistent feel. The excellent GNOME Software is getting an update too, with more transparent details about app permissions.

More on GNOME 3.32 ‘Taipei’

  • GNOME 3.32 ‘Taipei’ Linux Desktop Released With New Features

    he GNOME Foundation has released the latest version of GNOME desktop environment, i.e., GNOME 3.32 ‘Taipei’. GNOME arguably the most popular Linux desktop around and many mainstream distributions — including Ubuntu, Fedora, and openSUSE — feature the same.

    The latest version is the result of a six-month-long development process and it incorporates a total 26,438 changes made by about 798 developers.

By Packt Hub

GNOME 3.32 Now Available

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today's leftovers

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Linux Foundation and Servers Leftovers

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If you already are a Julia programmer or developer, you would be interested to know what are the top IDEs one can use. Julia is easier to work with when you make use of an IDE such as Juno which is an excellent IDE. For developers who wish to create complex applications, IDEs can be very helpful but it must be noted that there is no such specific feasible IDE for this language and one must choose their IDE according to their comfort level as well as accessibility to that language. In this article, we list down 5 Julia-specific IDEs along with some prominent alternative IDEs. Read more Also: Release of GooCalendar 0.5

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