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Mesa 19.0 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.0.0
    Hi List,
    
    I'm pleased to announce the general availability of mesa 19.0.0. We've had a
    slightly long rc process with 7 RCs (there should have been 6, but there was a
    bug in the script for pulling patches resulting in two back to back RCs). In
    general this release has shaped up rather nicely, and I look forward to the
    stable release cycle.
    
    Of note is that autotools support is deprecated in 19.0.0, and you must now add
    --enable-autotools to autogen.sh and configure. If you haven't already **now**
    is the time to try meson, if all goes according to plan autotools will be
    removed before the 19.1 release.
    
    Dylan
    
    shortlog:
    Brian Paul (1):
          svga: remove SVGA_RELOC_READ flag in SVGA3D_BindGBSurface()
    
    Danylo Piliaiev (1):
          anv: Fix destroying descriptor sets when pool gets reset
    
    Dylan Baker (4):
          cherry-ignore: Update the cherry-ignore file
          VERSION: bump for 19.0.0 release
          docs: Add release notes for 19.0.0
          docs: Add SHA256 sums for 19.0.0
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          st/dri: Set the PIPE_BIND_SHARED flag on create_image_with_modifiers.
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (1):
          virgl: remove unused variable
    
    Ian Romanick (2):
          intel/fs: nir_op_extract_i8 extracts a byte, not a word
          intel/fs: Fix extract_u8 of an odd byte from a 64-bit integer
    
    Jason Ekstrand (5):
          spirv: Pull offset/stride from the pointer for OpArrayLength
          anv: Refactor descriptor pushing a bit
          anv: Take references to push descriptor set layouts
          nir: Add a pass for lowering IO back to vector when possible
          intel/nir: Vectorize all IO
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (1):
          anv: destroy descriptor sets when pool gets reset
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: fix pointSizeRange limits
    
    Tapani Pälli (3):
          anv: release memory allocated by glsl types during spirv_to_nir
          anv: revert "anv: release memory allocated by glsl types during spirv_to_nir"
          anv: destroy descriptor sets when pool gets destroyed
    
    pal1000 (1):
          scons: Compatibility with Scons development version string
          
  • Mesa 19.0 Graphics Stack Released for Linux Gamers with Numerous Improvements

    The team behind the Mesa 3D Graphics Library project announced today the final release and general availability of the long-anticipated Mesa 19.0 graphics stack series for Linux-based operating systems.

    Implementing the OpenGL 4.5 API, the Mesa 19.0 graphics stack is finally here after an extended development cycle that took place over the last three months. It brings dozens of new features, new extensions, and countless bug fixes. Highlights of this major new series includes support for AMD Radeon Vega 10, Vega 20, and Vega M GPUs, GNU Hurd support, and LLVM 7 compatibility.

  • Mesa 19.0 Released With Many Improvements To The Open-Source Vulkan/OpenGL Drivers

    Mesa 19.0 has finally been released! It's more than two weeks late, but it should be worth the wait given all the improvements in this quarterly feature update to this open-source graphics driver stack.

    The Mesa 19.0 features are plentiful with Intel's Vulkan driver now having transform feedback and many other additions, soft FP64/INT64 was merged to Mesa, the necessary bits are in place for RadeonSI FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync, AMD Zen thread optimizations, various new OpenGL extensions, Vega RADV primitive binning is enabled by default, and a variety of performance improvements and other OpenGL/Vulkan driver tuning.

  • Mesa 19.0 is officially out, lots of improvements for Linux open source graphics drivers

    Today is the day, for those of you using open source graphics drivers (AMD/Intel and some older NVIDIA GPUs), Mesa 19.0 is now officially out.

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