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Games: Valve, GameMode, Jetstream, OpenRA, Gunslugs:Rogue Tactic and Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark

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Gaming
  • Any Steam game can now use Valve’s low-latency, DoS-proofed networking

    Valve is opening up its latency-reducing, DoS-protecting network relay infrastructure to every developer using its Steamworks platform.

    A few years ago, large-scale denial-of-service attacks against game servers were making the news and becoming a frustratingly frequent occurrence in online gaming and e-sports. To protect its own games, Valve has for a number of years been working on developing a networking infrastructure that makes the system more resilient against denial-of-service attacks and lower latency to boot, and the company is using this system for both Dota 2 and CS:GO.

    At 30 different locations around the world, Valve has established relaying servers that route networking traffic between clients and servers. These relay points provide DoS-resilience in several ways. They're equipped with an aggregate of several terabits of bandwidth, so they can handle a certain amount of flooding in any case. Games can also switch from one relay to another without necessarily interrupting their connection. This switching can be to another relay in the same location or even to another point-of-presence entirely.

  • Feral Interactive have put out a big update to their 'GameMode' Linux gaming performance tool

    We all want to get the best performance out of our Linux games and Feral Interactive's GameMode tool continues to help towards this. While the initial release of GameMode was quite limited, they haven't stopped working on it.

    They've just announced the release of GameMode 1.3, which adds in a bunch of pretty useful features including: disabling the screen-saver, a "gamemoderun" helper script to do the necessary setup (set LD_PRELOAD) to enable GameMode on games which do not support it themselves and increase I/O priority of game processes.

  • GameMode 1.3 Released For Optimizing Your Linux Gaming Experience

    Feral Interactive has released GameMode 1.3 as the newest feature release to this open-source Linux system daemon to dynamically optimize the CPU/GPU/system state when launching Linux games and to return the system to its normal state when you are done gaming.

    GameMode continues to be worked on predominantly by Feral Interactive developers who started the project last year along with Marc Di Luzio who is no longer at Feral but working on GameMode improvements under contract with Valve. With GameMode 1.3 comes several new features.

  • Jetstream looks like a pretty sweet puzzle game, releasing for Linux next month

    Clockwork Acorn revealed yesterday that their rather lovely looking puzzler Jetstream will release on April 2nd, with Linux support right away.

  • OpenRA for classic Command & Conquer games has a fresh release now out

    OpenRA, the open source game engine for the classics Command & Conquer titles (and a personal favourite) has a brand new release available.

    This update brings in all the changes from the last few test releases which include fixes to some long standing issues, as well as improve how fluid the gameplay is. A small change, yet one that's pretty major for the gameplay is how Tanks and other units with turrets will now automatically target enemy units while moving, which also takes the Fog of War into account.

  • Tactical action game 'Gunslugs:Rogue Tactics' coming to Linux from Orangepixel and it looks awesome

    Orangepixel are working on their next title, a tactical action game going by the name Gunslugs:Rogue Tactics and Linux support is in.

  • Turn-based tactical RPG 'Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark' prepares to leave Early Access with a massive update

    Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark, a turn-based tactical RPG from 1C Entertainment and 6 Eyes Studio that's supposed to be like a spiritual successor to Final Fantasy Tactics is getting ready to leave Early Access.

    From the press details we've received, the full release is going to be sometime in Spring 2019 and today it's getting a pretty big update "adding a huge amount of optional content to further flesh out its world". They say this update will make the game "nearly feature and content complete, offering up all the missions, classes, gear and optional content planned for release". However, the final encounter and some surprises are being left until the final launch.

More in Tux Machines

How to use Spark SQL: A hands-on tutorial

In the first part of this series, we looked at advances in leveraging the power of relational databases "at scale" using Apache Spark SQL and DataFrames. We will now do a simple tutorial based on a real-world dataset to look at how to use Spark SQL. We will be using Spark DataFrames, but the focus will be more on using SQL. In a separate article, I will cover a detailed discussion around Spark DataFrames and common operations. I love using cloud services for my machine learning, deep learning, and even big data analytics needs, instead of painfully setting up my own Spark cluster. I will be using the Databricks Platform for my Spark needs. Databricks is a company founded by the creators of Apache Spark that aims to help clients with cloud-based big data processing using Spark. Read more Also: Scaling relational databases with Apache Spark SQL and DataFrames

4 questions Uber's open source program office answers with data

It's been said that "Software is eating the world," and every company will eventually become a "software company." Since open source is becoming the mainstream path for developing software, the way companies manage their relationships with the open source projects they depend on will be crucial for their success. An open source program office (OSPO) is a company's asset to manage such relationships, and more and more companies are setting them up. Even the Linux Foundation has a project called the TODO Group "to collaborate on practices, tools, and other ways to run successful and effective open source projects and programs". Read more

Kernel: LWN on Linux 5.1 and More, 'Lake'-named Hardware

  • 5.1 Merge window part 1
    As of this writing, 6,135 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 5.1 release. That is approximately halfway through the expected merge-window volume, which is a good time for a summary. A number of important new features have been merged for this release; read on for the details.
  • Controlling device peer-to-peer access from user space
    The recent addition of support for direct (peer-to-peer) operations between PCIe devices in the kernel has opened the door for different use cases. The initial work concentrated on in-kernel support and the NVMe subsystem; it also added support for memory regions that can be used for such transfers. Jérôme Glisse recently proposed two extensions that would allow the mapping of those regions into user space and mapping device files between two devices. The resulting discussion surprisingly led to consideration of the future of core kernel structures dealing with memory management. Some PCIe devices can perform direct data transfers to other devices without involving the CPU; support for these peer-to-peer transactions was added to the kernel for the 4.20 release. The rationale behind the functionality is that, if the data is passed between two devices without modification, there is no need to involve the CPU, which can perform other tasks instead. The peer-to-peer feature was developed to allow Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) network interface cards to pass data directly to NVMe drives in the NVMe fabrics subsystem. Using peer-to-peer transfers lowers the memory bandwidth needed (it avoids one copy operation in the standard path from device to system memory, then to another device) and CPU usage (the devices set up the DMAs on their own). While not considered directly in the initial work, graphics processing units (GPUs) and RDMA interfaces have been able to use that functionality in out-of-tree modules for years. The merged work concentrated on support at the PCIe layer. It included setting up special memory regions and the devices that will export and use those regions. It also allows finding out if the PCIe topology allows the peer-to-peer transfers.
  • Intel Posts Linux Perf Support For Icelake CPUs
    With the core functionality for Intel Icelake CPUs appearing to be in place, Intel's open-source developers have been working on the other areas of hardware enablement for these next-generation processors. The latest Icelake Linux patches we are seeing made public by Intel is in regards to the "perf" subsystem support. Perf, of course, is about exposing the hardware performance counters and associated instrumentation that can be exercised by user-space when profiling performance of the hardware and other events.
  • What is after Gemini Lake?
    Based on a 10 nm manufacturing process, the Elkhart Lake SoC uses Tremont microarchitectures (Atom) [2] and features Gen 11 graphics similar to the Ice Lake processors [3]. Intel’s Gen 11 solution offers 64 execution units, and it has managed over 1 TFLOP in GPU performance [4]. This can be compared with the Nvidia GeForce GT 1030 which offered a peak throughput of 0.94 TFLOPs [5]. Code has already been added in the Linux mainline kernel [6] suggesting a possible Computex announcement and mid to late 2019 availability [7].

GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and GNOME Bugzilla

  • Parental controls hackfest
    Various of us have been meeting in the Red Hat offices in London this week (thanks Red Hat!) to discuss parental controls and digital wellbeing. The first two days were devoted to this; today and tomorrow will be dedicated to discussing metered data (which is unrelated to parental controls, but the hackfests are colocated because many of the same people are involved in both).
  • GNOME Bugzilla closed for new bug entry
    As part of GNOME’s ongoing migration from Bugzilla to Gitlab, from today on there are no products left in GNOME Bugzilla which allow the creation of new tickets. The ID of the last GNOME Bugzilla ticket is 797430 (note that there are gaps between 173191–200000 and 274555–299999 as the 2xxxxx ID range was used for tickets imported from Ximian Bugzilla). Since the year 2000, the Bugzilla software had served as GNOME’s issue tracking system. As forges emerged which offer tight and convenient integration of issue tracking, code review of proposed patches, automated continuous integration testing, code repository browsing and hosting and further functionality, Bugzilla’s shortcomings became painful obstacles for modern software development practices. Nearly all products which used GNOME Bugzilla have moved to GNOME Gitlab to manage issues. A few projects (Bluefish, Doxygen, GnuCash, GStreamer, java-gnome, LDTP, NetworkManager, Tomboy) have moved to other places (such as freedesktop.org Gitlab, self-hosted Bugzilla instances, or Github) to track their issues.