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Seven Things to do with a Free Vista laptop...

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Humor

Seems many bloggers woke up this morning to find Microsoft has left a laptop in their stocking. There is a minor hullabaloo rippling through Blogistan about it. Amongst others, Joel Spolsky of "Joel on Software" got one. This time, I'm not even linking to the original story; if you haven't heard about it by now, you don't care anyway.

So, blogging boys and girls, what could you do with this little windfall, should you find yourself inexplicably in possession of one?

#1 Return it. Send this foul spawn of Sauron back to the abyss.

#2 Install Linux on it, then return it!

Full Story.



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Fanboy much?

This is one of the lamest blog posts I've seen in a while. He is clearly griping because he didn't get one of these free laptops. Yes... I am so sure that if I receive a free laptop, I am just going to send it back.

Retarded blog post aside, I have to say I am somewhat impressed with Vista but there is still more bad than good. The RTM is far smoother running than the Betas were from this past summer, although I am still finding things that are broke. I assume these will be fixed closer to official launch though, as most of the issues have to do with third party software.

Vista is not piss poor like most fanbois want you to believe. Sure, there's a lot wrong with it, but there's a lot wrong with a lot of OS out there. I run more than one PC, and Vista is going to be the one on my Windows rig.

"Install Linux on it, then return it! Make it a really slick distro, like Mandriva, Knoppix, or Elive."

I am not a Linux nor Microsoft fanboi, but there is no distro that can compare to the look and ease of Vista. Even the media center portion is well done. In the end, I haven't actually run into a serious problem with the retail copy of Vista, and I think a lot of these "Linux geeks" should give it a try themselves before completely ragging on it.

re: Fanboy much?

Well, I thought the post was kinda cute myself. But I agree, he probably wishes he got one. ...AS I DO too! Big Grin Where's mine?! I did a fairly positive review of Vista not too long ago. Where's mine, huh, huh, huh? Big Grin

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