Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Sneak Peek at Mandriva 2006

Filed under
MDV
-s

Mandriva plans on releasing the community version of 2006 on or about August 15 and Official on September 15. With the first beta expected in little over week, I thought it wouldn't be entirely inappropriate to take a look at the current cooker and get an idea of the kinds of things to which we can look forward.

The most exciting new inclusion I spot almost immediately is KDE-3.4.1. Folks were sorely disappointed in getting 3.3.2 in 2005, and it looks like Mandriva is not gonna let that happen again. Right now some rpms are in the 2nd and 3rd incarnation, we can expect more improvements and bug squashes before release. However, in its present state, I found Mandriva's KDE to be quite stable and fast. I counted 5 seconds from typing 'startx' to seeing the splash screen disappear. (Good thing too, as they left Monster Tux splash to greet you!) Big Grin One can credit KDE with much of this speed improvement as I attested in my coverage of KDE 3.4.1. But it also must be said that Mandriva went from lilo to login in about 30 seconds. I have no idea what voodoo they've conjured to get those boot speeds, but its likely winning users and influencing developers.

I did have some trouble with fonts in konqueror. I couldn't seem to get them anti-aliased in the konqueror web browser. Perhaps this is related to still using xfs despite being exiled by Xorg. But they were gorgeous everywhere else.

I didn't really see too much new eye candy, but they usually throw that in during the last stages. They did change the default Monster Tux wallpaper to the less malevolent, quite familiar and aptly named 'default.png'. Big Grin

Which leads us to the kernel. Right now the latest kernel in cooker is linux-2.6.10-11. I would expect this to change probably even by the time the first beta hits the mirrors. They are coupling that with udev, but it looks as tho they are tarballing up all devices imaginable instead of using udev in the true dynamic manner in which it was written. This could change as well. However, it's a safe option as it eliminates the risk of devices not being made upon boot.

In addition to KDE, Mandriva has started using version 4.0 of gcc. I didn't try to compile anything with it during my test, unfortunately, but surely it works as I had to download 2500MB of rpms containing 550 packages to update my month old cooker. Tongue

Well that's the biggies I see at this point: KDE-3.4.1 and gcc-4.0. Stay tuned for further developments. Tuxmachines is planning to cover each stage of development of 2006 until the day of release. You can find Screenshots in the TuxGallery as always.

UPDATE: Please see complete rpm list here.

More in Tux Machines

illume OS 3 Linux Distro Officially Released, Based on Debian 8.1 "Jessie"

Clarence Siew was very proud Softpedia earlier today, July 4, about the immediate availability for download of the final version of his illume OS 3 distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux. Read more

LibreOffice 5, a foundation for the future

The release of the next major version of LibreOffice, the 5.0, is approaching fast. In several ways this is an unique release and I’d like to explain a bit why. Read more

Samsung Continues to Lessen Android Dependence

Samsung's partnership with members of the Linux Foundation appears to be bearing fruit. The partnership's mobile operating system -- dubbed Tizen -- is Linux-based. Samsung's initial Tizen phone rollout was rocky: The company's highly anticipated Samsung Z launch in Russia was quickly canceled last year, and the company blamed concerns about the ecosystem for the delay. Unfortunately, in many cases, ecosystem development presents a "chicken and egg" problem: Developers won't build apps until you have users, and users won't select your product until you have apps. Read more

Linux 4.2 Offers Performance Improvements For Non-Transparent Bridging

The Non-Transparent Bridge code is undergoing a big rework that has "already produced some significant performance improvements", according to its code maintainer Jon Mason. For those unfamiliar with NTB, it's described by the in-kernel documentation, "NTB (Non-Transparent Bridge) is a type of PCI-Express bridge chip that connects the separate memory systems of two computers to the same PCI-Express fabric. Existing NTB hardware supports a common feature set, including scratchpad registers, doorbell registers, and memory translation windows." Or explained simply by the Intel Xeon documentation that received the NTB support, "Non-Transparent Bridge (NTB) enables high speed connectivity between one Intel Xeon Processor-based platform to another (or other IA or non-IA platform via the PCIe interface)." Read more