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Google Releases Chrome OS 73 with Support for Sharing Files with Linux Apps

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Google has promoted today the Chrome OS 73 operating system to the stable channel for Chromebook devices, a release that adds several new features, improvements, bug fixes, and security updates.
Coming hot on the heels of the Chrome 73 web browser, which Google released last week for desktops, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, as well as Android mobile devices, the Chrome OS 73 operating system is here to add a number of enhancements to further enrich your Chromebook experience.

New features include support for sharing files and folders with Linux apps, improved native Google Drive integration in the Files app thanks to the addition of support for the Drive > Computers root, better out-of-memory management, native media controls for the video player, and audio focus support on CrOS.

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Chrome OS 73 rolling out

  • Chrome OS 73 rolling out w/ improved out-of-memory management, Linux for enterprise, & more

    This release continues Chrome 72’s push to simplify settings by adding a new “Sync and Google services” section. It consolidates options — previously under “Privacy” — related to data that Google collects in Chrome, while adding three new features. However, the new grouping is not yet widely rolled out.

    If Chrome Sync is enabled when you log-in with your Google Account, there is a new “Enhanced spell check” and “Safe browsing extended reporting” feature. There is also a new “Make searches and browsing better” option that lets Chrome collect anonymized URLs.

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