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Mandriva One Installation or other

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Hello, I was looking for a Linux OS for beginners. I have worked in Redhat about 4 years ago but I was just a user, I didn't actually do anything of value on it and my use was very limited.

I have an older machine running a 20gig hd with WinXP

I would like to explore the Linux route so I looked up Mandriva One 2007. However I read the review by srlinuxx and it has scared me somewhat.

My question is..

Is Mandriva One the right choice? or is there some other Linux version that would be suggested?

I have never installed an OS before.

My purpose is purely educational. I want to learn about Linux in a first hand experience. I would prefer a version that can be run from a cd.

Thanks in advance
Jason

thanks, I chose PCLOS, i

thanks, I chose PCLOS, i read up about it and the website has a lot or documentation which is helpful. Actually i am having a problem with booting pclos junior, i tried minime too but i got the same problem. and I'm about to post in their forums for help seeing as i couldn't find it in the wiki.

thanks for your input

Jason

re: mandriva one

It might be the one for you, it'd be hard for anyone to say what you'd like and what will work well with your hardware.

And you can't really go wrong booting up livecds.

There is also PCLOS which has a large following and is a big hit with newcomers. They are gonna be releasing a newer version in the next coupla months (or sooner), but since you mentioned a bit older hardware, .93(a) could work really well.

I like openSUSE as well and I saw where they were supposed to be adding a livecd last time I was at their site. There may be one now. I think it's a real good choice for newcomers.

And of course there is the uber-popular *Ubuntus. I think Kubuntu is a better choice as KDE might be easier for windows refugees than gnome.

And then there's mepis and knoppix, both of which are really user-friendly.

Try out some of these livecds and when you find one you like, then take the leap of trying to get it onto your harddrive.

Sorry can't be more certain, but distros are kinda personal in a way. It'd be sorta like me trying to tell you which car to buy. But if you decide upon one, we can help you if you have any trouble.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

If it breaks, you get to keep both pieces.

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