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Suse 10.2, parts 6 & 7

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SUSE

Beagle is Gnome's answer to built-in desktop indexing and search. The heart of Beagle appears to be beagled, the Beagle daemon. I went out earlier today to run a number of errands leaving europa on and running with openSuse. When I returned home several hours later, I came back to an unresponsive machine. The display was corrupt, with random pixels all over the screen. No jiggling of the shift keys on the keyboard or the mouse would bring up the desktop.

When I got control of the graphical desktop again I ran free in a terminal window to see how much swap space got chewed up. As I suspected, beagled-helper had eaten up a good chunk of swap.

Part 6: What is going on with beagled-helper?.


Also:

There are two key features that today's personal computers running Windows and Mac OS X are expected to have as soon as they start up; playback of audio and video. Audio playback can range from music CDs to MP3s ripped from those CDs, to DRMed content purchased from any number of on-line stores. Video playback ranges from proprietary formats such as Quicktime and Windows Media, and DVDs. When I installed Suse 10.2, I knew I wasn't going to get rich multimedia support out-of-the-box (or off-the-DVD). With my lowered expectations all I'm looking for are music CD playback, MP3 playback, and DVD playback.

The Good News: Music CDs

Music CD playback is just about perfect.

Part 7: Media support, mixed at best


Suse 10.2, part 8: Multimedia support updated

A comment from The Diabetic Geek about part 7 pointed me towards "Hacking openSUSE 10.2" and a laundry list of things to do to 10.2 in order to enhance its basic capabilities. I read Hacking several times, paying particular attention to the sections dealing with multimedia playback support. I'd already installed libdvdcss, so I followed two other steps: I added packman.unixheads.com/suse/10.2 to my repository sources and then I installed the win32 codecs from packman. But the act of adding the packman repository triggered the software updater, and informed me I needed to update what appears to be the core of the multimedia system on openSuse. What follows are two side-by-side screen shots of all the packages that I eventually upgraded.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Suse 10.2, part 9: Getting real work done

The youngest is going off to college as an incoming freshman in just a few days. She was going to back up her collection of MP3s and images she's collected and created over the past two years, but the Windows box had developed a problem with its burner, and she didn't want any more money spent to make the Windows system work. She still needed Dad and his Linux box to actually back up her Windows box and then burn that to DVD.

Full Post.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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