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There are a lot of reasons you might want to manually set your MAC address for your network card. I won’t ask you what your reason is.

To change this setting, we’ll need to edit the /etc/network/interfaces file. You can choose to use a different editor if you’d like.

Change your Network Card MAC Address on Ubuntu


Partition Image is a Linux/UNIX utility which saves partitions in many formats (see below) to an image file. The image file can be compressed in the GZIP/BZIP2 formats to save disk space, and split into multiple files to be copied on removable floppies (ZIP for example), … Partitions can be saved across the network since version 0.6.0.When using Partimage, the partitions must be unmounted.

Partimage is very useful in the following situations

First you can restore your linux partition if there is a problem (virus, file system errors, manipulation error) . When you have a problem, you just have to restore the partition, and after 10 minutes, you have the original partition. You can write the image to a CD-R if you don’t want the image to use hard-disk space.

This utility can be used to install many identical computers. For example, if you buy 50 PCs, with the same hardware, and you want to install the same linux systems on all 50 PCs, you will save a lot of time. Indeed, you just have to install on the first PC and create an image from it. For the 49 others, you can use the image file and Partition Image’s restore function.

Backup and Restore Linux Partitions Using Partimage


If you want to create a system that is similar to a different system you have already set up, it can be difficult to remember each and every package you had installed.This method works best when you are exporting to and importing from the same distribution and, specifically, the same releasefor example, exporting from Ubuntu Dapper to Ubuntu Dapper or ubuntu edgy to ubuntu edgy.

Ubuntu uses the APT package management system which handles installed packages and their dependencies. If we can get a list of currently installed packages you can very easily duplicate exactly what you have installed now on your new machine.

Clone Your Ubuntu installation


Creating an optimal flexible layout (OFL) for a Xen cluster is more difficult than setting up a standalone box with just one environment running on it. This is especially true if you’re planning to let inexperienced users play on the boxes with escalated privileges, or if you are building your cluster to cope with disparate uses on the VMs. Databases, Web servers, and compute boxes can be difficult to manage in their own separate systems, and they’re much more difficult to manage in a Xen cluster if the sys admin of each VM is unaware of the load others are putting upon the architecture. The admins may not have sight of the other VMs’ hardware usage patterns and could encounter difficulty investigating bottlenecks and stoppages inside their own VMs caused by contention on the hypervisor’s other VMs. What is gained by using Xen in terms of flexibility and efficient use of hardware could easily be lost to complexity if initial plans of usage are poorly developed or inadequately tested. Gibbins shows how to set up a self-managed Xen cluster.

Xen Master is Yum


More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

A tour of Google's 2016 open source releases

Open source software enables Google to build things quickly and efficiently without reinventing the wheel, allowing us to focus on solving new problems. We stand on the shoulders of giants, and we know it. This is why we support open source and make it easy for Googlers to release the projects they're working on internally as open source. We've released more than 20-million lines of open source code to date, including projects such as Android, Angular, Chromium, Kubernetes, and TensorFlow. Our releases also include many projects you may not be familiar with, such as Cartographer, Omnitone, and Yeoman. Read more

Viewing Linux Logs from the Command Line

At some point in your career as a Linux administrator, you are going to have to view log files. After all, they are there for one very important reason...to help you troubleshoot an issue. In fact, every seasoned administrator will immediately tell you that the first thing to be done, when a problem arises, is to view the logs. And there are plenty of logs to be found: logs for the system, logs for the kernel, for package managers, for Xorg, for the boot process, for Apache, for MySQL… For nearly anything you can think of, there is a log file. Read more

At Long Last, Linux Gets Dynamic Tracing

When the Linux kernel version 4.9 will be released next week, it will come with the last pieces needed to offer to some long-awaited dynamic thread-tracing capabilities. As the keepers of monitoring and debugging software start using these new kernel calls, some of which have been added to the Linux kernel over the last two years, they will be able to offer much more nuanced, and easier to deploy, system performance tools, noted Brendan Gregg, a Netflix performance systems engineer and author of DTrace Tools, in a presentation at the USENIX LISA 2016 conference, taking place this week in Boston. Read more