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Linux Lite 4.4 is ready to replace Microsoft Windows on your aging PC

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Linux

One of the best things about operating systems based on the Linux kernel is they can sometimes be very lightweight. Why is this important? Well, when an OS uses very few resources, it can breathe new life into an aging PC. In other words, just because Windows 7 or Windows 10 run like molasses on your old computer, that doesn't mean you have to buy a new one. The right Linux distribution can make your older PC feel fast and new.

One of the most popular lightweight Linux-based operating systems is Linux Lite. Heck, the name of the distribution tells you that it is designed to use few resources! Version 4.4 is now available, and as per usual, it is based on the latest Ubuntu LTS -- 18.04. The Xfce desktop environment will feel familiar to those switching from Windows. Those new to Linux will also appreciate the easy access to many popular programs, such as Skype, Steam, and Spotify. Even the excellent Microsoft Office alternative, LibreOffice, is included.

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Origiinal

By Softpedia News (Marius Nestor)

  • Linux Lite 4.4 Officially Released, It’s Based on Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS

    Linux Lite project manager Jerry Bezencon announced today the final release of the Linux Lite 4.4 operating system, which brings various enhancements and updated components.

    Based on the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, Linux Lite 4.4 is here to add a number of minor changes to the GNU/Linux distribution beloved by so many users worldwide. The most important change is the fact that there aren’t beta releases anymore, which were replaced with RC (Release Candidate) images.

    “The RC information and Build number will only appear on the default wallpaper for that release, Login screen and the Live Boot screen. The positioning of the text is such that it allows room for desktop widgets like Conky and Lite Widget to appear uncluttered on the right,” said Jerry Bezencon.

Linux Lite 4.4 Released: A Lightweight Windows Replacement

  • Linux Lite 4.4 Released: A Lightweight Windows Replacement For All

    Linux Lite, as its name suggests, is a lightweight Linux distribution that can be easily used by a beginner or an expert. The developers of this open source operating system are here with the latest Linux Lite 4.4 Final. Based on Ubuntu 18.04.2, this release is powered by Linux kernel 4.15.0-45.

    For existing Lite users, this release might not be exciting as it seems like simply a way to refresh the ISO images and inculcate the minor changes and fixes made over the past few months.

Linux Lite 4.4 overview | Simple Fast Free

Linux Lite 4.4 Run Through

It is based on the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating

  • Linux Lite 4.4 released, brings various enhancements and updated components

    It is based on the Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system. One of the best things about operating systems based on the Linux kernel is they can sometimes be very lightweight. Linux Lite 4.4 is here with a number of minor changes to the GNU/Linux distribution which is beloved by so many users worldwide. The most important change is the fact that there aren’t beta releases anymore, which were replaced with RC (Release Candidate) images.

    The RC information and Build number will only appear on the default wallpaper for that release, Login screen and the Live Boot screen. The positioning of the text is such that it allows room for desktop widgets like Conky and Lite Widget to appear uncluttered on the right,” said Jerry Bezencon.

How to install Linux Lite 4.4

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