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25 Years Later: Interview with Linus Torvalds

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Linux
Interviews

Well, I'll be 75 by then, and I doubt I'll be involved day to day. But considering that I've been doing this for almost 30 years, maybe I'd still be following the project.

And the good news is that we really do have a pretty solid developer base, and I'm not worried about "where will Linus be" kind of issues. Sure, people have been talking about how kernel developers are getting older for a long time now, but that's not really because we wouldn't be getting any new people, it's literally because we still have a lot of people around that have been around for a long time, and still enjoy doing it.

I used to think that some radical new and exciting OS would come around and supplant Linux some day (hey, back in 1994 I probably still thought that maybe Hurd would do it!), but it's not just that we've been doing this for a long time and are still doing very well, I've also come to realize that making a new operating system is just way harder than I ever thought. It really takes a lot of effort by a lot of people, and the strength of Linux—and open source in general, of course—is very much that you can build on top of the effort of all those other people.

So unless there is some absolutely enormous shift in the computing landscape, I think Linux will be doing quite well another quarter century from now. Not because of any particular detail of the code itself, but simply fundamentally, because of the development model and the problem space.

I may not be active at that point, and a lot of the code will have been updated and replaced, but I think the project will remain.

Read more

Corresponding magazine

  • The 25th Anniversary Issue

    "Linux is an independent implementation of the POSIX operating system specification (basically a public specification of much of the Unix operating system) that has been written entirely from scratch. Linux currently works on IBM PC compatibles with an ISA or EISA bus and a 386 or higher processor. The Linux kernel was written by Linus Torvalds from Finland, and by other volunteers."

    Thus begins the very first Letter from the Editor (written by Phil Hughes), in the very first issue of Linux Journal, published in the March/April issue in 1994...25 years ago—coinciding, as fate would have it, with the 1.0.0 release of the Linux kernel itself (on March 14th).

    A quarter of a century.

    Back when that first issue was published, Microsoft hadn't yet released Windows 95 (version 3.11 running on MS-DOS still dominated home computing). The Commodore Amiga line of computers was still being produced and sold. The music billboards were topped by the likes of Toni Braxton, Ace of Base and Boyz II Men. If you were born the day Linux Journal debuted, by now you'd be a full-grown adult, possibly with three kids, a dog and a mortgage.

    Yeah, it was a while ago. (It's okay to take a break and feel old now.)

LJ Free Download

An article about the article (the interview)

  • Linus Torvalds: People take me much too seriously, I can't say stupid crap anymore

    The once highly-strung Linux kernel founder Linus Torvalds now says he's become quieter, more self-aware and less forceful, but not necessarily more diplomatic. And he hates social-media companies.

    As we know, Torvalds late last year took a short break from leading Linux kernel development to take stock of his infamous outbursts and reflect on how his language and behavior affected other kernel developers.

    In an interview with Linux Journal published yesterday, the Linux kingpin offered a fresh self-assessment since vowing to tone down his language and help foster a healthier, more professional way of communication between kernel developers, in line with the new Linux Kernel Contributor Covenant Code of Conduct Interpretation.

Why Linux Creator Linus Torvalds Thinks Facebook Is A Disease?

  • Why Linux Creator Linus Torvalds Thinks Facebook Is A Disease?

    Fake News was crowned as the word of the year in 2017. In an era where we need quality journalism, social media sites are bent on destroying it. In a recent interview with Linux Journal’s first publisher, Robert Young, Linus Torvalds — Creator of Linux — revealed the true nature of social media.

    Linus pulled no punches as he brandished social media websites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google as the enabler of bad behavior. Linus’ comments on the ‘liking and sharing’ model on Facebook hold weight as it degrades the quality of what we consume online.

Linus Torvalds on Social Media

‘Anonymity is overrated’ according to Linux’s founder

  • ‘Anonymity is overrated’ according to Linux’s founder

    Linux kernel creator Linus Torvalds thinks ‘anonymity is overrated’ and only important for true whistle-blowers.

    The always opinionated and notoriously blunt creator of the Linux kernel made the claim during an interview with the Linux Journal when asked if there was “one thing he’d fix” in the world of networking published on Tuesday.

    “I’m actually one of those people who thinks that anonymity is overrated. Some people confuse privacy and anonymity and think they go hand in hand, and that protecting privacy means that you need to protect anonymity,” he said.

    “I think that’s wrong. Anonymity is important if you’re a whistle-blower, but if you cannot prove your identity, your crazy rant on some social-media platform shouldn’t be visible, and you shouldn’t be able to share it or like it.”

One of the world's most important programmers, Linus Torvalds

  • One of the world's most important programmers, Linus Torvalds, says Twitter, Facebook, Instagram are 'a disease'

    Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux operating system that secretly runs the internet and is the basis for Android, was recently asked what he would change about the tech world that his technology helped create, if he could.

    His answer: social media.

    "I absolutely detest modern 'social media' — Twitter, Facebook, Instagram. It's a disease. It seems to encourage bad behavior," Torvalds told the Linux Journal's Robert Young.

    This is interesting criticism from a man who has often been accused of being uncivil to other programmers on Linux email lists. Torvalds is known as a brilliant, funny, and speaks-his-mind kind of guy who is generally fair-minded but doesn't tolerate fools.

Linux Boss condemns Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

  • Linux Boss condemns Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

    The most powerful enterprise Operating System in the world Linux’s creator and principal Director Linus Torvalds has strongly condemned a number of social media platforms, chiefly Facebook which he called a disease to human kind.

    In a recent interview, Torvalds disdained Facebook, Twitter and Instagram saying these platforms seems to encourage bad behaviour by human beings and he absolutely detests such platforms.

    Torvalds garbaged the whole ‘liking’ and ‘sharing’ functions on all these social media platforms, saying that they offer no effort in quality control of content, resulting in people sharing any trash that they might come across.

    Torvalds further said the whole thing is infact further geared to the reverse of quality control, with lowest common denominator targets, click-bait and things designed to create emotional responses which are often of moral outrage.

More on Linus Torvalds Calling Social Control Media "Disease"

  • Facebook, Twitter, Instagram are 'garbage,' says Linux founder Torvalds

    Count another person who isn't "liking" social media these days.

    Linus Torvalds, the Finnish-born creator of the free Linux software that competes against Apple's MacOS and Microsoft's Windows to power computers, didn't mince words when discussing Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. And in an interview this week with Linux Journal, he suggested it's one of the biggest issues the tech industry is facing today.

  • Linux Creator: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter Are "A Disease"

    Linus Torvalds, the Linux creator who’s himself known for angry tirades, said that if he could fix one thing about the internet, it would be modern social media — a flame-spitting recrimination by the inventor of the software that keeps much of the social web running.

    “I absolutely detest modern media — Twitter, Facebook, Instagram,” Torvalds told Linux Journal in a new interview. “It’s a disease. It seems to encourage bad behavior.”

More articles about Torvalds blasting Social Control Media

  • Linus Torvalds blasts social media as 'a disease'

    LINUX DON Linus Torvalds has spoken of his dislike of social media in an interview to mark the 25th birthday of the operating system.

    In a wide-ranging interview with Linux Journal, Torvalds blasts: "I absolutely detest modern 'social media' .- Twitter, Facebook, Instagram. It's a disease. It seems to encourage bad behaviour."

    Torvalds, who has been oft criticised for his online rants and famously stepped away from Linux to 'learn empathy' goes on: "I think part of it is something that email shares too, and that I've said before: 'On the internet, nobody can hear you being subtle'. When you're not talking to somebody face to face, and you miss all the normal social cues".

    He's not wrong. Some theorists believe that as much as 95 per cent of communication is non-verbal, and although the actual figure is probably somewhat lower, it's actually well over 50 per cent, meaning half the message is lost instantly when you aren't face-to-face.

  • Linux creator calls modern social media a ‘disease’

    Linus Torvalds, who gave the world Linux OS in 1994 has always been an outspoken individual. He is recognized for always being blunt and speaking his mind, and it has caused him some trouble.

    In an interview with the Linux Journal, Linus did not hold back punches when talking about modern social media sites.

  • Linux software founder calls Facebook, Instagram, Twitter a ‘disease, garbage’

    Not many people are fan of social media these days and one more person has joined the list, founder of software operating system Linux, who called social media sites a ‘disease’ and ‘garbage’.

    Linus Torvalds, founder of the free Linux software that is the basis of Android and competes against Microsoft’s Windows Apple’s MacOS to power computers recently discussed about Facebook, Instagram and Twitter suggesting them as one of the biggest issues in tech industry today.

    In an interview with Linux Journal, Torvalds was asked about what he would change about the tech world to which he expressed, “I absolutely detest modern ‘social media’ – Twitter, Facebook, Instagram. It’s a disease. It seems to encourage bad behavior. The whole ‘liking’ and ‘sharing’ model is just garbage.

Linus Torvalds On Linux Past, Present and Future

  • Linus Torvalds On Linux Past, Present and Future

    The 1994 interview took place three and a half years after the initial release of Linux. At the time Linus was still studying for his MSc in Computer Science, at the University of Helsinki in his native country Finland, writing his thesis: Linux: A Portable Operating System. This reminds us that Linux started out as more or less a hobby project for use on a personal computer and even the Linux mascot, Tux the penguin, was personal to Linus.

The Creator of Linux Says Facebook, Twitter, And Instagram...

  • The Creator of Linux Says Facebook, Twitter, And Instagram Are "a Disease"

    Linus Torvalds, the Linux creator who's himself known for angry tirades, said that if he could fix one thing about the internet, it would be modern social media — a flame-spitting recrimination by the inventor of the software that keeps much of the social web running.

    "I absolutely detest modern media — Twitter, Facebook, Instagram," Torvalds told Linux Journall in a new interview. "It's a disease. It seems to encourage bad behavior."

    In particular, Torvalds said he takes issue with how social media is geared to generate as much engagement as possible.

From Pakistan

  • Linux founder calls social media a ‘disease, garbage’

    “I absolutely detest modern media Twitter, Facebook, Instagram,” “It’s a disease. It seems to encourage bad behavior.”

    In particular, Torvalds said he takes issue with how social media is geared to generate as much engagement as possible.

    “The whole ‘liking’ and ‘sharing’ model is just garbage. There is no effort and no quality control,” Torvalds said. “In fact, it’s all geared to the reverse of quality control, with lowest common denominator targets, and click-bait, and things designed to generate an emotional response, often one of moral outrage.”

In Republicworld

  • Linux Founder Linus Torvalds Thinks Facebook, Twitter And Instagram Are A ‘disease’

    In a recent interview with Linux Journal, Linus Torvalds, a creator of Linux suggested social media happens to be one of the major issues the tech industry is facing nowadays.

    During an interview, Torvalds talked about many things. However, one of the main highlights the entire interview was social media. Torvalds called social media platforms including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram a ‘disease.’

Linux Creator Linus Torvalds Bashes Social Networks

  • Linux Creator Linus Torvalds Bashes Social Networks for Encouraging the Spread of Hate Speech!

    It has become quite difficult to find reliable news these days, especially on the Social Media platforms. There are multiple different versions of the same story. Linux’s Creator, Linus Torvalds heavily criticized and exposed the nature of Social Media during his interview with Robert Young, Linux Journal’s first publisher.

    According to Linus, Social Media websites such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are responsible for the instigation of hatred. He also brought up how Facebook’s “liking and sharing” culture has tarnished the credibility of news. Linus said that Facebook’s clickbait content’s main purpose is to cause outrage among masses.

Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are ”a disease”

  • Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are ”a disease”, says the Linux creator

    Social media giants are facing a lot of criticism nowadays. There are various issues ranging from the spreading of extremist content to privacy breaches. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux recently added a psychological angle to the story. Torvalds holds the view that social media networks are “a disease” and that they encourage bad behavior.

Asay cherry-picks Torvalds interview, the reason won't surprise

Did Linux’s inventor chastise social media?

  • Did Linux’s inventor chastise social media?

    Collaboration, messaging, sharing and dissemination of information – all those possibilities and more. Plus, the platform is developed by what’s termed “the community,” a loose, unorganized bunch of developers, designers, administrators, geeks, bug testers and tech-types who stand to gain nothing (in most cases) by way of monetary gain. Distributed for free, and freely, it represents everything great and good about the human race, the epitome of what this nascent race of ours is capable.

    But Linux’s founder, inventor and guiding (some would say) father figure, Linus Torvalds recently summed up the other side of what the internet enables humans to do: socialize and communicate with others in despicable ways. In an interview with Linux Journal, he stated, “[…] I absolutely detest modern social media – Twitter, Facebook, Instagram. It’s a disease. It seems to encourage bad behavior. I think part of it is something that email shares too, and that I’ve said before: “‘On the internet, nobody can hear you being subtle.'”

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