Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

DXVK 1.1 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • DXVK, the Vulkan-based layer for Direct3D 10/11 in Wine has a major 1.1 release out now

    DXVK, the awesome project that has helped push Linux gaming further has a new release out and it sounds pretty huge.

    Firstly, for Unreal Engine 4 titles (and several other unnamed games) DXVK 1.1 has "Queries" re-implemented which should allow for improved GPU utilization. The feature is widely used apparently, so it may help quite a number of games. DXVK also now comes with basic support for Predication based on the new query stuffs.

    Another major difference is that DXVK 1.1 uses "in-memory compression for shader code", which should result in games with a large number of shaders seeing reduced memory utilization. However, it may increase shader compile times "slightly". Games noted to benefit include Overwatch, Quake Champions and Dishonored 2 seeing "several hundred Megabytes of RAM" savings.

  • DXVK 1.1 Released With Vulkan Queries Work, Other Improvements

    DXVK 1.1 is out this weekend in time for some weekend Linux game testing. This library, which is used for implementing Direct3D 10/11 over Vulkan for the benefit of Windows games running on Linux under Wine/Proton (Steam Play), has new abilities and performance enhancements with today's update.

    DXVK 1.1 has performance improvements around Unreal Engine 4 games and other titles thanks to better GPU utilization via Vulkan queries. To benefit, systems need Wine 4.5+ or Proton 4.2+ and be running the NVIDIA 418.49.4 driver or Mesa 19.1-devel Git. There is also initial and basic support for predication via VK_EXT_conditional_rendering.

DXVK 1.1 rereleased

  • DXVK 1.0.3 Released Following The Recalled DXVK 1.1

    While DXVK 1.1 was released earlier this month, it ultimately was recalled due to game crashes and GPU hangs that are still being investigated. For now, DXVK 1.0.3 has been released as the latest and greatest version of this library for translating Direct3D 10/11 calls to make use of the Vulkan graphics API for Windows gaming on Linux with Wine/Proton.

    DXVK 1.0.3 back-ports some of the v1.1 material like exposing version information within the DXVK DLLs. There are also bug fixes in DXVK 1.0.3 around geometric shaders, passing of undefined data causing unexpected shader cache misses, and gracefully handling surface loss.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

10 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software for Linux Users

Mind maps are diagrams used to organize information visually in hierarchical ways that show relationships among the elements that make up the map. Drawing mind maps have been proven to be highly effective for getting information in and out of the brain especially when combined with logical note-taking that typically details or summarizes the roles of the map’s components along the way. There are various mind mapping software out there ranging from free to paid to open source options. Today, my job is to list the best mind mapping software available to users for free. They are all modern, easy enough to use, and offer sufficient consumer support. Read more

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

Filesystem Hierarchy Standard

If you are new to the Linux command line, you may find yourself wondering why there are so many unusual directories, what they are there for, and why things are organized the way they are. In fact, if you aren't accustomed to how Linux organizes files, the directories can seem downright arbitrary with odd truncated names and, in many cases, redundant names. It turns out there's a method to this madness based on decades of UNIX convention, and in this article, I provide an introduction to the Linux directory structure. Although each Linux distribution has its own quirks, the majority conform (for the most part) with the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS). The FHS project began in 1993, and the goal was to come to a consensus on how directories should be organized and which files should be stored where, so that distributions could have a single reference point from which to work. A lot of decisions about directory structure were based on traditional UNIX directory structures with a focus on servers and with an assumption that disk space was at a premium, so machines likely would have multiple hard drives. Read more