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Programming: Working With GTK and Python

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  • Sam Thursfield: Tools I like for creating web apps

    Here’s a list of the technologies I’ve recently used and liked.

    First, Bootstrap. It’s really a set of CSS classes which turn HTML into something that “works out of the box”. To me it feels like a well-designed widget toolkit, a kind of web counterpart to GTK. Once you know what Bootstrap looks like, you realize that everyone else is already using it. Thanks to Bootstrap, I don’t really need to understand CSS at all anymore. Once you get bored of the default theme, you can try some others.

    Then, jQuery. I guess everyone in the world uses jQuery. It provides powerful methods to access JavaScript functionality that is otherwise horrible to use. One of its main features is the ability to select elements from a HTML document using CSS selectors. Normally jQuery provides a function named $, so for example you could get the text of every paragraph in a document like this: $('p').text(). Open up your browser’s inspector and try it now! Now, try to do the same thing without jQuery — you’ll need at least 6 times more code.1

    After that, Riot.js. Riot is a UI library which lets you create a web page using building blocks which they call custom tags. Each custom tag is a snippet of HTML. You can attach JavaScript properties and methods to a custom tag as well, and you can refer to them in the snippet of HTML giving you a powerful client-side template framework.

  • CPUFREQ Power Manager Gnome Extension Ported To Gtk

    CPUFREQ Power Manager GNOME extension was recently ported to Gtk. In the future, this will allow the extension to work on other desktop environments, but for now it still requires Gnome Shell.

    CPUFREQ Power Manager (or just CPUFREQ) is a CPU frequency monitor and governor manager. It shows the current CPU frequency, while also allowing the user to change the CPU governor (performance/powersave), a feature which works with both Intel P-State and the CPUFreq kernel module.

    Besides CPU frequency monitoring and governor management, the application can also set CPU frequency speed limits, enable or disable Turbo Boost, set the numbers of online cores, while also allowing users to create their own custom profiles.

  • Python REST APIs With Flask, Connexion, and SQLAlchemy – Part 3

    In Part 2 of this series, you added the ability to save changes made through the REST API to a database using SQLAlchemy and learned how to serialize that data for the REST API using Marshmallow. Connecting the REST API to a database so that the application can make changes to existing data and create new data is great and makes the application much more useful and robust.

    That’s only part of the power a database offers, however. An even more powerful feature is the R part of RDBMS systems: relationships. In a database, a relationship is the ability to connect two or more tables together in a meaningful way. In this article, you’ll learn how to implement relationships and turn your Person database into a mini-blogging web application.

  • Publishing a Book with Sphinx
  • Return a welcome message based on the input language

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Chinese hackers backdoor chat app with new Linux, macOS malware [Ed: Nowadays the Microsofters in the media are calling "backdoors" things that are simply malware and one has to actually install; of course they like to blame "Linux" (because the user can add malware on top of it). Saying Linux isn't secure because it doesn't prevent you installing malware is like saying bridges are dangerous because you may commit suicide by jumping off them.]

    Versions of a cross-platform instant messenger application focused on the Chinese market known as 'MiMi' have been trojanized to deliver a new backdoor (dubbed rshell) that can be used to steal data from Linux and macOS systems.

  • Linux Threats: A Black Hat 2022 Hot Topic? (Video) [Ed: Aside from patent trolling, Blackberry reinvented itself as anti-Linux FUD source in recent years. They intentionally overlook back doors (e.g. Windows) and blame everything on "Linux".]

    There are usually a few cyberthreat trends that seem to emerge as important themes at each year’s Black Hat conference. And this year, the increase in Linux threats may be one of them.

  • #StopRansomware: Zeppelin Ransomware [Ed: Ransomware is predominantly a Microsoft Windows problem]

    CISA and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have released a joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA), #StopRansomware: Zeppelin Ransomware, to provide information on Zeppelin Ransomware. Actors use Zeppelin Ransomware, a ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS), against a wide range of businesses and critical infrastructure organizations to encrypt victims’ files for financial gain.

  • CISA Adds Two Known Exploited Vulnerabilities to Catalog

    CISA has added two new vulnerabilities to its Known Exploited Vulnerabilities Catalog, based on evidence of active exploitation. These types of vulnerabilities are a frequent attack vector for malicious cyber actors and pose significant risk to the federal enterprise. Note: to view the newly added vulnerabilities in the catalog, click on the arrow in the "Date Added to Catalog" column, which will sort by descending dates. 

  • Cisco Releases Security Update for Multiple Products

    This vulnerability could allow a remote attacker to obtain sensitive information. For updates addressing lower severity vulnerabilities, see the Cisco Security Advisories page.

today's leftovers

  • Portable Computer Pre-History: Portable Before Laptops

    Portability is relative. When former Texas Instruments employees Rod Canion, Jim Harris and Bill Murto created a portable version of the IBM PC in 1982, it was a hulking device that weight 28 pounds and was roughly the size of a sewing machine. If you sold a desktop computer that weighed 28 pounds in 2018, you’d be laughed off the block. But the device, called the Compaq Portable, was revolutionary for its time and thrust the company that made it into the mainstream. It wasn’t too long before then that a portable computer was so embarrassingly large that you would probably break your legs if you used it as a laptop. Tonight’s Tedium ponders a time when portable computing meant something just a little bit bigger.

  • Fedora Sway OSTree Spin name

    The Fedora Sway SIG is working to create an immutable version of the Sway Spin (also work in progress) using OSTree. Those immutable spins of Fedora are becoming more common following Silverblue and Kinoite’s success. As it often happens, one of the most challenging things to do in creating something is to come up with clever names. This task is made even more complex by the relatively small amount of people active in this conversation. For this reason, during the last SIG meeting, it was decided to socialize this decision so that more people could suggest their ideas.

  • Output requirements.txt packages pinned to latest version
  • How to install OpenSCAD on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install OpenSCAD on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • Stupid SMP Tricks: A Review of Locking Engineering Principles and Hierarchy: paulmck — LiveJournal

    Daniel Vetter put together a pair of intriguing blog posts entitled Locking Engineering Principles and Locking Engineering Hierarchy. These appear to be an attempt to establish a set of GPU-wide or perhaps even driver-tree-wide concurrency coding conventions. Which would normally be none of my business. After all, to establish such conventions, Daniel needs to negotiate with the driver subsystem's developers and maintainers, and I am neither. Except that he did call me out on Twitter on this topic. So here I am, as promised, offering color commentary and the occasional suggestion for improvement, both of Daniel's proposal and of the kernel itself. The following sections review his two posts, and then summarize and amplify suggestions for improvement.

  • Ubuntu Unity 22.04 Quick overview #linux #UbuntuUnity - Invidious
  • FOSS Force Open Source News Quiz (8/12/22) - FOSS Force

    How closely did you follow the news about Linux and free and open source software this week? You can get an idea about how well informed you are (and have some fun in the process) by taking our Open Source News Quiz. Once you’re done, scroll down to the comments section and let us know how you did!

elementary Blog: Updates for July, 2022

Firstly, thank you so much for your patience this month! I’ve been out sick with COVID for about 3 weeks, so I haven’t been able to contribute much or organize releases this month. I want to give a special thanks to our volunteer community who has continued to make improvements and move forward on projects in my absence. I’m excited to catch up and get back to work to make the most of the rest of this month. Having said that, this is going to be a very brief updates post. [...] A ton of energy in the community has gone into Gtk 4 porting for OS 7 and beyond. The team is making steady progress on porting System Settings and we landed the Gtk 4 port for Sideload. We’ve also uncovered some style issues and gaps in style constants, so if you’re working on porting your app to our Flatpak Platform 7, know that we’ll be releasing some fixes soon. I want to give some special acknowledgment to Owen Malicsi who has taken a lot of ownership over Gtk4 porting. Owen started contributing to elementary to improve his development skillset in preparation for college, and he’s done an amazing job both in successfully porting components to Gtk 4 as well as identifying blockers and creating discussions around refactoring for Gtk 4 paradigms. I’m super proud of his growth and contribution and we wish him well in his studies! Thanks Owen! Read on