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Programming: LLVM, Python, Bash, C and More

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  • LLVM Accepts NVIDIA's "f18" Fortran Compiler As An Official Fortran Compiler

    This week the LLVM Foundation formally accepted "f18" as part of the LLVM project. This is the initiative led by NVIDIA in developing a modern LLVM-based Fortran compiler.

  • from dynaconf import settings

    Often when starting a new Python project we need to spend some time thinking about how to manage the settings, decide on which module the configuration manager will be written, decide which name to give to this module, create a class or function to store the configuration keys, create the conditions for multiple environments and still need to worry about where these keys will be stored and in which file format?

  • Cleanup remote git repository of all branches already merged into master
  • Determining if a String Contains a Substring in Bash
  • PyCon 2019 close to sell out! [Ed: This headline is a lie. PyCon already sold out. It sold out to Microsoft (advertising Azure in exchange for sponsorship). Not so hard to understand why PyCon sold out to Microsoft if one considers that the Board which manages it got partly bought by Microsoft as well.]
  • Using pytineye to automate searching for images.

    The TinEye API is ideally suited for image and profile verification, UGC moderation, copyright compliance and fraud detection.

  • Migrating Java applications to Quarkus: Lessons learned

    Migrating applications from a well-grounded framework to a completely new framework just a few days after its public release sounds crazy, right? Before doing so, I asked myself several questions, such as: Why should I do that? Is this new framework stable? What would be the gain? To me, the most important of these is: Why?

    To help answer that question, I started thinking about my application’s performance—in this case, the bootstrap time—and asked myself whether I was happy with the actual time my application took to start up. The answer was no. And, nowadays, this is one of the most important metrics to be considered when working with microservices, mainly on a serverless architecture.

    The goal of this article is to provide a point of reference for a basic migration of an existing Java EE application to Quarkus. For this reason, I’ll save a few lines of the article by not introducing Quarkus and focus mostly on the migration part. If you don’t know what Quarkus is, then I recommend reading this article and visiting the Quarkus homepage.

  • Linux C Programming tutorial Part 21: Character pointers, array of pointers, and pointer to pointer

    The concept of pointers is indeed one of the very important concepts in the C programming language. Up until now, we have discussed several aspects of pointers in C. Expanding on that, in this tutorial, we will be discussing a few more pointer concepts.

  • PostgreSQL security: a quick look at authentication best practices [Tutorial]

    Data protection and security are essential for the continuity of business. Data protection is not recommended, but it is required by the legal system. Sensitive data, such as user information, email addresses, geographical addresses, and payment information, should be protected against any data breach. There are several other topics related to data security, such as data privacy, retention, and loss prevention. In this article, we will look at authentication best practices in PostgreSQL including PostgreSQL host-based authentication, and proxy authentication strategies.

More in Tux Machines

Database News on YugaByte Going for Apache 2.0 Licence

  • YugaByte Becomes 100% Open Source Under Apache 2.0 License

    YugaByte, a provider of open source distributed SQL databases, announced that YugaByte DB is now 100% open source under the Apache 2.0 license, bringing previously commercial features into the open source core. The transition breaks the boundaries between YugaByte’s Community and Enterprise editions by bringing previously commercial-only, closed-source features such as Distributed Backups, Data Encryption, and Read Replicas into the open source core project distributed under the permissive Apache 2.0 license. Starting immediately, there is only one edition of YugaByte DB for developers to build their business-critical, cloud-native applications.

  • YugaByte's Apache 2.0 License Delivers 100% Open Source Distributed SQL Database

    YugaByte, the open source distributed SQL databases comapny, announced that YugaByte DB is now 100 percent open source under the Apache 2.0 license, bringing previously commercial features into the open source core. The move, in addition to other updates available now through YugaByte DB 1.3, allows users to more openly collaborate across what is now the world’s most powerful open source distributed SQL database.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: YugaByte DB

    This week’s SD Times Open Source Project of the Week is the newly open-sourced YugaByte DB, which allows users to better collaborate on the distributed SQL database. The move to the open-source core project distributed under the Apache 2.0 license makes previously closed-sourced features such as distributed backups, data encryption and read replicas more accessible, according to the team. By doing this, YugaByte plans to break the boundaries between YugaByte’s Community and Enterprise editions. “YugaByte DB combines PostgreSQL’s language breadth with Oracle-like reliability, but on modern cloud infrastructure. With our licensing changes, we have removed every barrier that developers face in adopting a business-critical database and operations engineers face in running a fleet of database clusters, with extreme ease,” said Kannan Muthukkaruppan, co-founder and CEO of YugaByte.

Programming: Ruby, NativeScript, Python, Rust/C/C++ FUD From Microsoft

Security Leftovers

  • Alas, Poor PGP

    The first is an assertion that email is inherently insecure and can’t be made secure. There are some fairly convincing arguments to be made on that score; as it currently stands, there is little ability to hide metadata from prying eyes. And any format that is capable of talking on the network — as HTML is — is just begging for vulnerabilities like EFAIL. But PGP isn’t used just for this. In fact, one could argue that sending a binary PGP message as an attachment gets around a lot of that email clunkiness — and would be right, at the expense of potentially more clunkiness (and forgetfulness). What about the web-of-trust issues? I’m in agreement. I have never really used WoT to authenticate a key, only in rare instances trusting an introducer I know personally and from personal experience understand how stringent they are in signing keys. But this is hardly a problem for PGP alone. Every encryption tool mentioned has the problem of validating keys. The author suggests Signal. Signal has some very strong encryption, but you have to have a phone number and a smartphone to use it. Signal’s strength when setting up a remote contact is as strong as SMS. Let that disheartening reality sink in for a bit. (A little social engineering could probably get many contacts to accept a hijacked SIM in Signal as well.) How about forward secrecy? This is protection against a private key that gets compromised in the future, because an ephemeral session key (or more than one) is negotiated on each communication, and the secret key is never stored. This is a great plan, but it really requires synchronous communication (or something approaching it) between the sender and the recipient. It can’t be used if I want to, for instance, burn a backup onto a Bluray and give it to a friend for offsite storage without giving the friend access to its contents. There are many, many situations where synchronous key negotiation is impossible, so although forward secrecy is great and a nice enhancement, we should assume it to be always applicable. [...] My current estimate is that there’s no magic solution right now. The Sequoia PGP folks seem to have a good thing going, as does Saltpack. Both projects are early in development, so as a privacy-concerned person, should you trust them more than GPG with appropriate options? That’s really hard to say.

  • Armadillo Is An Open-Source “USB Firewall” Device To Protect You Against USB Attacks

    Exchanging data using USB devices is something that we do on a daily basis. But how often do you think that the next USB device that you’ll plug into your PC’s port could be malicious? In the past, researchers have unveiled 29 types of USB attacks that could compromise your sensitive data by simply plugging in a USB device. Globotron’s Armadillo is a device that you could use to protect yourself from USB attacks.

  • Open source solutions in autonomous driving: safety is more than an afterthought [Ed: A lot less likely to contain back doors, unlike proprietary software where this has become rather 'standard' a 'feature']

    In the automotive industry, in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems were one of the early adopters of open source operating systems, namely Linux. Today’s innovation and success with IVIs can largely be attributed to this approach. Collaborative efforts such as the GENIVI Alliance and Automotive Grade Linux—where automakers, suppliers, and their competitors agree to share common elements of the IVI software stack—are enabling rapid development in this area.

  • New open source solution reduces the risks associated with cloud deployments [Ed: This is an inherently flawed kind of logic because if you handed over control to AWS, then the Pentagon already controls everything and thus you have zero security, you're 'pwned' by definition]

    The Galahad software will be deployed to AWS and provides a nested hypervisor on AWS instances. There, it will monitor role-based virtual machines virtually across all levels of the application stack including the docker container: the basic unit of software that packages an application to run quickly between computing environments.

  • Open-Source Exploit: Private Keys in MyDashWallet Exposed for Two Months- Users Should Move Funds Immediately [Ed: Highly misleading headline. This has nothing to do with "Open Source"; it's about some fool who uploaded private keys]

    The private keys of Dash crypto coins being held in online software “hot wallet” called MyDashWallet have been exposed to hackers for two months, and anyone using the wallet should immediately move funds out. A “hot wallet” is any cryptocurrency software “wallet” connected to the Internet.

Devices: 'IoT', SparkFun and Beelink L55

  • Top 20 Best Internet of Things Projects (IoT Projects) That You can Make Right Now

    Internet of Things (IoT) is a new predominant technology for this advanced world. This technology can change the lifestyle people lead. Question is what the Internet of Things is? IoT can be described as a network of physical objects connected through the internet. Physical objects could be anything that contains embedded electronics, software, sensor, etc. with the internet. Using the IP addresses, those smart objects can exchange data among the network and can make a decision. A significant number of researches is going on over the IoT trends and projects. In this article, we will talk about a few IoT project ideas based on standard IoT protocols, so that readers get the basic knowledge about the Internet of Things. These internet of things example are keen, useful, and interesting to build.

  • Open-Source SparkFun Module Supports Low-Power TensorFlow Machine Learning

    SparkFun has released the SparkFun Artemis, Engineering Version, an open-source embedded development kit that supports the TensorFlow machine learning environment. Designed for toolchain-agnostic, low-power machine learning development, the 15.5 mm x 10.5 mm Artemis board includes... [...] In addition to a secure firmware update system, flexible, serial peripherals, a suite of clock sources, and camera compatibility, the Artemis board features large SMD pads that support carrier board implementations. SparkFun has launched three carrier boards in conjunction with the release of the Artemis, Engineering version board: the BlackBoard Artemis (Arduino Uno footprint); BlackBoard Artemis Nano (smallest form factor); and BlackBoard Artemis ATP (with 48 GPIO pins).

  • Beelink L55 Review – An Intel Core i3-5005U Mini PC Tested with Windows 10 & Ubuntu 18.04

    With the shortage of Gemini Lake processors, some manufacturers have taken to releasing new mini PCs using older CPUs