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GNU GPLv3 At The Center Of The Black Hole Image

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Sci/Tech

Scientists have finally seen what could not have been seen – a black hole. As fascinating is the fact that we can now ‘see’ a black hole, the story behind this achievement is even more fascinating.

It’s a story of victory of science in the political era of science denials. It’s a victory of diversity in the era of homophobia and sexism. It’s a victory of free software in the era of…well, we live in the era of free software.

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Open Source Helped Scientists See The Black Hole

  • Open Source Helped Scientists See The Black Hole

    Free and Open Source software was at the center of the first image of a black hole. The team used three different imaging software libraries to achieve the feat. Out of the three, two were fully open source libraries – Sparselab and ehtim.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

IDG Article About This

Black Hole Image Has an Open Source Connection

  • Black Hole Image Has an Open Source Connection

    Two imaging libraries responsible for the image are fully open source.

    Last week the whole world was stunned by seeing what was unseen – a black hole. Scientists were able to create picture of a black hole named Messier 87 in the Virgo A galaxy. The black hole is more than 55 million light years away.

    The first image of a black hole is the outcome of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, which created a virtual telescope as big as earth by networking 8 ground-based telescopes. The telescopes generated more than five petabyte of data. Collecting data was the first part of the puzzle. The team of scientists used various algorithms to fill gaps in this data to be able to generate an image of the black hole.

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