Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Servers: Hadoop, Amazon Rivals, Red Hat/IBM, Kubernetes, OpenStack and More

Filed under
Server
  • Breaking Out of the Hadoop Cocoon

    The announcement last fall that top Hadoop vendors Cloudera and Hortonworks were coming together in a $5.2 billion merger – and reports about the financial toll that their competition took on each other in the quarters leading up to the deal – revived questions that have been raised in recent years about the future of Hadoop in an era where more workloads are moving into public clouds like Amazon Web Services (AWS) that offer a growing array of services that many of the jobs that the open-source technology already does.

    Hadoop gained momentum over the past several years as an open-source platform to collect, store and analyze various types of data, arriving as data was becoming the coin of the realm in the IT industry, something that has only steadily grown since. As we’ve noted here at The Next Platform, Hadoop has evolved over the years, with such capabilities as Spark in-memory processing and machine learning being added. But in recent years more workloads and data have moved to the cloud, and the top cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform all offer their own managed services, such as AWS’ Elastic Map Reduce (EMR). Being in the cloud, these services also offer lower storage costs and easier management – the management of the infrastructure is done by the cloud provider themselves.

  • A guide for database as a service providers: How to stand your ground against AWS – or any other cloud

    NoSQL database platform MongoDB followed suit in October 2018 announcing a Server Side Public License (SSPL) to protect “open source innovation” and stop “cloud vendors who have not developed the software to capture all of the value while contributing little back to the community.” Event streaming company, Confluent issued its own Community License in December 2018 to make sure cloud providers could no longer “bake it into the cloud offering, and put all their own investments into differentiated proprietary offerings.”

  • The CEO of DigitalOcean explains how its 'cult following' helped it grow a $225 million business even under the shadow of Amazon Web Services

    DigitalOcean CEO Mark Templeton first taught himself to code at a small hardwood business. He wanted to figure out how to use the lumber in the factory most efficiently, and spreadsheets only got him so far.

    "I taught myself to write code to write a shop floor control and optimization system," Templeton told Business Insider. "That allowed us to grow, to run the factory 24 hours a day, all these things that grow in small business is new. As a self-taught developer, that's what launched me into the software industry."

    And now, Templeton is learning to embrace these developer roots again at DigitalOcean, a New York-based cloud computing startup. It's a smaller, venture-backed alternative to mega-clouds like Amazon Web Services, but has found its niche with individual programmers and smaller teams.

  • IBM’s Big-Ticket Purchase of Red Hat Gets a Vote of Confidence From Wall Street
  • How Monzo built a bank with open infrastructure

    When challenger bank Monzo began building its platform, the team decided it would get running with container orchestration platform Kubernetes "the hard way". The result is that the team now has visibility into outages or other problems, and Miles Bryant, platform engineer at Monzo, shared some observations at the bank at the recent Open Infrastructure Day event in London.

    Finance is, of course, a heavily regulated industry - and at the same time customer expectations are extremely exacting. If people can't access their money, they tend to get upset.

  • Kubernetes Automates Open-Source Deployment

    Whether for television broadcast and video content creation, delivery or transport of streamed media, they all share a common element, that is the technology supporting this industry is moving rapidly, consistently and definitively toward software and networking. The movement isn’t new by any means; what now seems like ages ago, in the days where every implementation required customized software on a customized hardware platform has now changed to open platforms running with open-source solution sets often developed for open architectures and collectively created using cloud-based services.

  • Using EBS and EFS as Persistent Volume in Kubernetes

    If your Kubernetes cluster is running in the cloud on Amazon Web Services (AWS), it comes with Elastic Block Storage (EBS). Or, Elastic File System (EFS) can be used for storage.

    We know pods are ephemeral and in most of the cases we need to persist the data in the pods. To facilitate this, we can mount folders into our pods that are backed by EBS volumes on AWS using AWSElasticBlockStore, a volume plugin provided by Kubernetes.

    We can also use EFS as storage by using efs-provisioner. Efs-provisioner runs as a pod in the Kubernetes cluster that has access to an AWS EFS resource.

  • Everything You Want To Know About Anthos - Google's Hybrid And Multi-Cloud Platform

    Google's big bet on Anthos will benefit the industry, open source community, and the cloud native ecosystem in accelerating the adoption of Kubernetes.

  • Raise a Stein for OpenStack: Latest release brings faster containers, cloud resource management

    The latest OpenStack release is out in the wilds. Codenamed Stein, the platform update is said to allow for much faster Kubernetes deployments, new IP and bandwidth management features, and introduces a software module focused on cloud resource management – Placement.

    In keeping with the tradition, the 19th version of the platform was named Stein after Steinstraße or "Stein Street" in Berlin, where the OpenStack design summit for the corresponding release took place in 2018.

    OpenStack is not a single piece of software, but a framework consisting of an integration engine and nearly 50 interdependent modules or projects, each serving a narrowly defined purpose, like Nova for compute, Neutron for networking and Magnum for container orchestration, all linked together using APIs.

  • OpenStack Stein launches with improved Kubernetes support

    The OpenStack project, which powers more than 75 public and thousands of private clouds, launched the 19th version of its software this week. You’d think that after 19 updates to the open-source infrastructure platform, there really isn’t all that much new the various project teams could add, given that we’re talking about a rather stable code base here. There are actually a few new features in this release, though, as well as all the usual tweaks and feature improvements you’d expect.

    While the hype around OpenStack has died down, we’re still talking about a very active open-source project. On average, there were 155 commits per day during the Stein development cycle. As far as development activity goes, that keeps OpenStack on the same level as the Linux kernel and Chromium.

  • Community pursues tighter Kubernetes integration in Openstack Stein

    The latest release of open source infrastructure platform Openstack, called 'Stein', was released today with updates to container functionality, edge computing and networking upgrades, as well as improved bare metal provisioning and tighter integration with popular container orchestration platform Kubernetes - led by super-user science facility CERN.

    It also marks roughly a year since the Openstack Foundation pivoted towards creating a more all-encompassing brand that covers under-the-bonnet open source in general, with a new umbrella organisation called the Open Infrastructure Foundation. Openstack itself had more than 65,000 code commits in 2018, with an average of 155 per day during the Stein cycle.

  • Why virtualisation remains a technology for today and tomorrow

    The world is moving from data centres to centres of data. In this distributed world, virtualisation empowers customers to secure business-critical applications and data regardless of where they sit, according to Andrew Haschka, Director, Cloud Platforms, Asia Pacific and Japan, VMware.

    “We think of server and network virtualisation as being able to enable three fundamental things: a cloud-centric networking fabric, with intrinsic security, and all of it delivered in software. This serves as a secure, consistent foundation that drives businesses forward,” said Haschka in an email interview with Networks Asia. “We believe that virtualisation offers our customers the flexibility and control to bring things together and choose which way their workloads and applications need to go – this will ultimately benefit their businesses the most.”

  • Happy 55th birthday mainframe

    7 April marked the 55th birthday of the mainframe. It was on that day in 1964 that the System/360 was announced and the modern mainframe was born. IBM’s Big Iron, as it came to be called, took a big step ahead of the rest of the BUNCH (Burroughs, UNIVAC, NCR, Control Data Corporation, and Honeywell). The big leap of imagination was to have software that was architecturally compatible across the entire System/360 line.

  • Red Hat strategy validated as open hybrid cloud goes mainstream

    “Any products, anything that would release to the market, the first filter that we run through is: Will it help our customers with their open hybrid cloud journey?” said Ranga Rangachari (pictured), vice president and general manager of storage and hyperconverged infrastructure at Red Hat.

    Rangachari spoke with Dave Vellante (@dvellante) and Stu Miniman (@stu), co-hosts of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio, during the Google Cloud Next event. They discussed adoption of open hybrid cloud and how working as an ecosystem is critical for success in solving storage and infrastructure problems (see the full interview with transcript here). (* Disclosure below.)

More in Tux Machines

GNOME Devs Mull Making Dedicated System Info Tool

Would you find the GNOME desktop more useful if it could tell you more about the system you’re running? If so, you may be interested to hear about a new app mooted by GNOME design team member Allan Day. Day proposes the creation of a new hardware diagnostics tool that would, in his words: “show technical details about the system and the available hardware. It would also include information about the firmware for your hardware, and allow blacklisting certain firmware versions.” Now, call me wrong — I usually am — but doesn’t that sounds like it would be mightily useful? Read more

Android Leftovers

OSS: Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW), Molly de Blanc on 'Breaking Up', Apache Software Foundation News and Beancount Examined

  • Business models and open source
    One of the more lively sessions that was held at the 2019 Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) was Heather Meeker's talk on open-source business models and alternative licensing. As a lawyer in private practice, Meeker worked on a number of the alternative licenses that were drafted and presented over the last year or so. But she is also part of a venture capital (VC) firm that is exclusively investing in companies focused on open source, so she has experience in thinking about what kinds of models actually work for those types of businesses. The LLW is organized annually by the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). It is meant as a gathering for lawyers, engineers, and others interested in licensing topics. By default, sessions are run under the Chatham House Rule, which means that participants cannot be identified, either by name or affiliation. Meeker waived that rule for her talk, though those from the audience who made comments may or may not have waived the rule. Meeker acknowledged that her topic was controversial, but that she would be "your Beatrice [from the Divine Comedy] to the miasma of venture-backed open-source companies". Her slides were entitled "What color are your razor blades? FOSS business models". The title is referencing the famous What Color is Your Parachute? book for job seekers. The idea is to imagine an idea with specificity, so open-source companies need to imagine what they are selling (their "razor blades") with specificity in order to be successful. Otherwise, she said, they end up with the business model of the Underpants Gnomes ("1. Collect underpants, 2. ?, 3. Profit"). For a long time, there was a tendency for open-source entrepreneurs to equate "lots of downloads" with profit, which is more or less the same thing. That is not really going to happen unless a lot of thought is put into how the business will actually function.
  • Molly de Blanc: breaking up
    FLOSS is about choice (among other things). One of the things we get from developer freedom is the ability to specialize or have specialized technology — the development of features and tools, the fixing of bugs and anti-features.
  • Apache Software Foundation Advances Enterprise App Development With Top Level Projects
    The open source Netbeans Java Integrated Developer Environment (IDE) and SkyWalking application performance monitoring (APM) project efforts move forward. Open source is often at the core of modern enterprise applications and few if any organizations have as much impact as the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). The Apache Software Foundation runs its open source projects on a hierarchy of principally three levels, top-level projects (TLPs), sub-projects and incubated projects. Achieving the TLP status is a major milestone for an open source effort. Among the projects that have recently achieved TLP status is the Apache Netbeans Java Integrated Developer Environment (IDE) and the Apache Skywalking application performance monitoring (APM) efforts.
  • Counting corporate beans
    Some things simply take time. When your editor restarted the search for a free accounting system, he had truly hoped to be done by now. But life gets busy, and accounting systems are remarkably prone to falling off the list of things one wants to deal with in any given day. On the other hand, accounting can return to that list quickly whenever LWN's proprietary accounting software does something particularly obnoxious. This turns out to be one of those times, so your editor set out to determine whether beancount could do the job. Beancount was already covered here almost exactly one year ago, but that review was focused on personal finances; company accounting has a different set of requirements. That article is worth reviewing, though, as the material covered there will (mostly) not be repeated here. Here, instead, the emphasis will be on what a simple business needs. At the top of the list is the ability to import data into the system and to get it back out again. An ongoing business has a long accounting history that needs to be present going forward. Beancount keeps all of its data in a plain-text file with a well-documented format, so both import and export are relatively easy. Building on the the tools written to extract data from QuickBooks, your editor was able to write a script to import the accounting database into beancount over the course of an hour or two.

Security: Updates, Windows Issues, GNOME Security Internship and Slackware Security Updates

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Microsoft blocks Windows 10 May 2019 Update on PCs that use USB storage or SD cards
  • Windows Malware ‘Aggah’ Infects Your PCs Through Microsoft Word Docs
    The latest in a series of online attacks is ‘Aggah’, a global malware campaign with roots in the Middle East. The Windows Malware comprises a commodity Trojan script being spread via an infected Microsoft Word Document. The perpetrators are tricking users into downloading and activating the malicious code using RevengeRAT. Since RevengeRat is comprised of several open source Trojan builds, it is very difficult to pinpoint the actual spammer. The people involved in this are using the alias name ‘haggah’ to carry out their operation.
  • Ludovico de Nittis: After GNOME Security Internship - Update 7
    I received a few code reviews in the GNOME Settings Daemon MR that I’ll try to address in the next days. Also I’m going to widen the requirements for allowing keyboards when the screen is locked. Right now if the lock screen is active we authorize a keyboard only if it is the only available keyboard in the system. It was a good idea in theory but not that much in practice. For example let’s assume that you use an hardware USB switch hub between your desktop and your laptop with a mouse and a keyboard attached. If you have a “gaming” mouse with extra keys it is not only a mouse but also a keyboard. That means that when you want to switch from your laptop the the desktop, the mouse and the keyboard will be connected nearly simultaneously and if the mouse goes first the real keyboard will not the authorized. So you’ll be locked out from your system. The gaming mouse is also only an example. If you have a yubikey shared in this USB hub there will be the same problem explained above. For this reason in the next days I’ll edit the current implementation so that every USB keyboards will be authorized even if the lock screen is active. However we will still show a notification to explain that we authorized a new keyboard while the screen was locked.
  • MATE 1.22.1 Brings Sharper Icons and Security Updates
    It's been a month since the final release of MATE 1.22.0 and the developers has pushed a new update MATE 1.22.1 which fixed some issues, including security fixes in the code that still uses unsafe functions such as strcat or strcpy. The new mate-icon-theme is also featuring a sharper icons for some MATE components as can be seen in the git log. The icons are now built using latest inkscape version so you will notice some differences once you upgrade your MATE components and logout from your X and login again or reboot your machine. For this new update, i had to patch the upstream source a bit to remove a dependency of inkscape in order to build mate-utils. It was introduced in this commit, but i revert some of the changes in the latest commit here. It won't have any effect at all for users as inkscape is only used as a build dependency, not as runtime dependency.