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Servers: Hadoop, Amazon Rivals, Red Hat/IBM, Kubernetes, OpenStack and More

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  • Breaking Out of the Hadoop Cocoon

    The announcement last fall that top Hadoop vendors Cloudera and Hortonworks were coming together in a $5.2 billion merger – and reports about the financial toll that their competition took on each other in the quarters leading up to the deal – revived questions that have been raised in recent years about the future of Hadoop in an era where more workloads are moving into public clouds like Amazon Web Services (AWS) that offer a growing array of services that many of the jobs that the open-source technology already does.

    Hadoop gained momentum over the past several years as an open-source platform to collect, store and analyze various types of data, arriving as data was becoming the coin of the realm in the IT industry, something that has only steadily grown since. As we’ve noted here at The Next Platform, Hadoop has evolved over the years, with such capabilities as Spark in-memory processing and machine learning being added. But in recent years more workloads and data have moved to the cloud, and the top cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform all offer their own managed services, such as AWS’ Elastic Map Reduce (EMR). Being in the cloud, these services also offer lower storage costs and easier management – the management of the infrastructure is done by the cloud provider themselves.

  • A guide for database as a service providers: How to stand your ground against AWS – or any other cloud

    NoSQL database platform MongoDB followed suit in October 2018 announcing a Server Side Public License (SSPL) to protect “open source innovation” and stop “cloud vendors who have not developed the software to capture all of the value while contributing little back to the community.” Event streaming company, Confluent issued its own Community License in December 2018 to make sure cloud providers could no longer “bake it into the cloud offering, and put all their own investments into differentiated proprietary offerings.”

  • The CEO of DigitalOcean explains how its 'cult following' helped it grow a $225 million business even under the shadow of Amazon Web Services

    DigitalOcean CEO Mark Templeton first taught himself to code at a small hardwood business. He wanted to figure out how to use the lumber in the factory most efficiently, and spreadsheets only got him so far.

    "I taught myself to write code to write a shop floor control and optimization system," Templeton told Business Insider. "That allowed us to grow, to run the factory 24 hours a day, all these things that grow in small business is new. As a self-taught developer, that's what launched me into the software industry."

    And now, Templeton is learning to embrace these developer roots again at DigitalOcean, a New York-based cloud computing startup. It's a smaller, venture-backed alternative to mega-clouds like Amazon Web Services, but has found its niche with individual programmers and smaller teams.

  • IBM’s Big-Ticket Purchase of Red Hat Gets a Vote of Confidence From Wall Street
  • How Monzo built a bank with open infrastructure

    When challenger bank Monzo began building its platform, the team decided it would get running with container orchestration platform Kubernetes "the hard way". The result is that the team now has visibility into outages or other problems, and Miles Bryant, platform engineer at Monzo, shared some observations at the bank at the recent Open Infrastructure Day event in London.

    Finance is, of course, a heavily regulated industry - and at the same time customer expectations are extremely exacting. If people can't access their money, they tend to get upset.

  • Kubernetes Automates Open-Source Deployment

    Whether for television broadcast and video content creation, delivery or transport of streamed media, they all share a common element, that is the technology supporting this industry is moving rapidly, consistently and definitively toward software and networking. The movement isn’t new by any means; what now seems like ages ago, in the days where every implementation required customized software on a customized hardware platform has now changed to open platforms running with open-source solution sets often developed for open architectures and collectively created using cloud-based services.

  • Using EBS and EFS as Persistent Volume in Kubernetes

    If your Kubernetes cluster is running in the cloud on Amazon Web Services (AWS), it comes with Elastic Block Storage (EBS). Or, Elastic File System (EFS) can be used for storage.

    We know pods are ephemeral and in most of the cases we need to persist the data in the pods. To facilitate this, we can mount folders into our pods that are backed by EBS volumes on AWS using AWSElasticBlockStore, a volume plugin provided by Kubernetes.

    We can also use EFS as storage by using efs-provisioner. Efs-provisioner runs as a pod in the Kubernetes cluster that has access to an AWS EFS resource.

  • Everything You Want To Know About Anthos - Google's Hybrid And Multi-Cloud Platform

    Google's big bet on Anthos will benefit the industry, open source community, and the cloud native ecosystem in accelerating the adoption of Kubernetes.

  • Raise a Stein for OpenStack: Latest release brings faster containers, cloud resource management

    The latest OpenStack release is out in the wilds. Codenamed Stein, the platform update is said to allow for much faster Kubernetes deployments, new IP and bandwidth management features, and introduces a software module focused on cloud resource management – Placement.

    In keeping with the tradition, the 19th version of the platform was named Stein after Steinstraße or "Stein Street" in Berlin, where the OpenStack design summit for the corresponding release took place in 2018.

    OpenStack is not a single piece of software, but a framework consisting of an integration engine and nearly 50 interdependent modules or projects, each serving a narrowly defined purpose, like Nova for compute, Neutron for networking and Magnum for container orchestration, all linked together using APIs.

  • OpenStack Stein launches with improved Kubernetes support

    The OpenStack project, which powers more than 75 public and thousands of private clouds, launched the 19th version of its software this week. You’d think that after 19 updates to the open-source infrastructure platform, there really isn’t all that much new the various project teams could add, given that we’re talking about a rather stable code base here. There are actually a few new features in this release, though, as well as all the usual tweaks and feature improvements you’d expect.

    While the hype around OpenStack has died down, we’re still talking about a very active open-source project. On average, there were 155 commits per day during the Stein development cycle. As far as development activity goes, that keeps OpenStack on the same level as the Linux kernel and Chromium.

  • Community pursues tighter Kubernetes integration in Openstack Stein

    The latest release of open source infrastructure platform Openstack, called 'Stein', was released today with updates to container functionality, edge computing and networking upgrades, as well as improved bare metal provisioning and tighter integration with popular container orchestration platform Kubernetes - led by super-user science facility CERN.

    It also marks roughly a year since the Openstack Foundation pivoted towards creating a more all-encompassing brand that covers under-the-bonnet open source in general, with a new umbrella organisation called the Open Infrastructure Foundation. Openstack itself had more than 65,000 code commits in 2018, with an average of 155 per day during the Stein cycle.

  • Why virtualisation remains a technology for today and tomorrow

    The world is moving from data centres to centres of data. In this distributed world, virtualisation empowers customers to secure business-critical applications and data regardless of where they sit, according to Andrew Haschka, Director, Cloud Platforms, Asia Pacific and Japan, VMware.

    “We think of server and network virtualisation as being able to enable three fundamental things: a cloud-centric networking fabric, with intrinsic security, and all of it delivered in software. This serves as a secure, consistent foundation that drives businesses forward,” said Haschka in an email interview with Networks Asia. “We believe that virtualisation offers our customers the flexibility and control to bring things together and choose which way their workloads and applications need to go – this will ultimately benefit their businesses the most.”

  • Happy 55th birthday mainframe

    7 April marked the 55th birthday of the mainframe. It was on that day in 1964 that the System/360 was announced and the modern mainframe was born. IBM’s Big Iron, as it came to be called, took a big step ahead of the rest of the BUNCH (Burroughs, UNIVAC, NCR, Control Data Corporation, and Honeywell). The big leap of imagination was to have software that was architecturally compatible across the entire System/360 line.

  • Red Hat strategy validated as open hybrid cloud goes mainstream

    “Any products, anything that would release to the market, the first filter that we run through is: Will it help our customers with their open hybrid cloud journey?” said Ranga Rangachari (pictured), vice president and general manager of storage and hyperconverged infrastructure at Red Hat.

    Rangachari spoke with Dave Vellante (@dvellante) and Stu Miniman (@stu), co-hosts of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s mobile livestreaming studio, during the Google Cloud Next event. They discussed adoption of open hybrid cloud and how working as an ecosystem is critical for success in solving storage and infrastructure problems (see the full interview with transcript here). (* Disclosure below.)

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • 10 Best WordPress Popup Plugins of 2019

    Do you often come across websites that have annoying pop-ups? What do you generally do? Well, oftentimes, an annoying pop-up makes us not only close the pop-up but even the website! As a website owner, you must consider what kind of pop-up will attract a website visitor and make him/her subscribe to your email list. You might have invested a lot on your website but a basic pop-up can turn off your visitor’s interest in your service. On the other hand, even a dull website with an interesting email subscription popup plugins can successfully increase your conversion rate. In this article, we will be discussing the top 10 WordPress Popup Plugin in 2019 which can help you grow your email list exponentially!

  • Apache Software Foundation cofounder Jim Jagielski on the evolution of open source

    Jagielski attended and spoke at the first Mid-Atlantic Developer Conference last year, and said he was impressed by the diversity of the crowd across both demographics as well as tech interests. He saw a reflection of the values of the open source community, which encourages everyone to get involved and views all contributions as useful.

  • Ubisoft joins Blender Development Fund

    Today Ubisoft announced that they will join the Blender Foundation’s Development Fund as a corporate Gold member. Not only will Ubisoft help funding online support for Blender developers, Ubisoft Animation Studio – a department of Ubisoft Film and Television – will also use Blender for their productions and assign developers to contribute to Blender’s open source projects. Pierrot Jacquet, Head of Production at Ubisoft Animation Studio says “Blender was for us an obvious choice: Its strong and engaged community paired up with the vision carried by the Blender Foundation makes it one of the most creative DCC of the market.”

  • ProFTPD Vulnerability Lets Users Copy Files Without Permission [Ed: Troll site BleepingComputer changed headline from "ProFTPD Remote Code Execution Bug Exposes Over 1 Million Servers" to "ProFTPD Vulnerability Lets Users Copy Files Without Permission" (under rare conditions) because that's too much FUD even by its own standards?]

    Under certain conditions, ProFTPD servers are vulnerable to remote code execution and information disclosure attacks after successful exploitation of an arbitrary file copy vulnerability in the mod_copy module. ProFTPd is an open-source and cross-platform FTP server with support for most UNIX-like systems and Windows, and one of the most popular ones targeting the UNIX-based platforms along with Pure-FTPd and vsftpd.

  • Lyft releases open source data set for autonomous vehicle development

    In an effort to bolster the development of cars capable of driving themselves around without human supervision, Lyft today released an autonomous vehicle data set that the company is calling the largest of its kind. It’s freely available in the existing nuScenes format, which was initially developed by Aptiv. “Autonomous vehicles are expected to dramatically redefine the future of transportation. When fully realized, this technology promises to unlock a myriad of societal, environmental, and economic benefits,” said Lyft. “With this, we aim to empower the community, stimulate further development, and share our insights into future opportunities from the perspective of an advanced industrial autonomous vehicles program.”

GIMP review

GIMP (the GNU Image Manipulation Program) is our top pick for the best free photo editor, and comes with a huge array of professional-quality functions for fine-tuning snaps and creating your own artwork from scratch. It includes layers, highly customizable brushes, filters and automatic image-enhancement tools, and support for a huge number of plugins (some pre-installed, and others available to download separately). Its active community of contributors means it’s in constant development, and any bugs are squished in short order. It all adds up to make a truly remarkable free photo editor that’s superior to many commercial programs. Read more

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux: BricsCAD Shape, WPS Office, Dropbox, and "Mac" Binaries (Through Darling)

  • BricsCAD Shape is a Free SketchUp Alternative for Ubuntu & Linux Mint

    BricsCAD Shape is a free product from CAD software company Bricsys, who offer a range of full-featured (and pricey) CAD software for Windows, macOS and Linux desktops.

  • WPS Office on Linux is a Free Alternative to Microsoft Office

    If you are looking for a free alternative of Microsoft Office on Linux, WPS Office is one of the best choice. It’s free to use and offers compatibility with MS Office document formats. WPS Office is a cross-platform office productivity suite. It is light and fully compatible with Microsoft Office, Google Docs/Sheets/Slide and Adobe PDF. For many users, WPS Office feels intuitive and capable enough to meet their needs. It has gained popularity because of its closeness to Microsoft Office, both in terms of looks and compatibility.

  • Dropbox restores Linux support in new client beta

    That decision saw the sync ‘n’ share giant decide not to support “uncommon” filesystems, leaving it happy to work with just NTFS for Windows, HFS+ or APFS for Mac and Ext4 for Linux. Developers and Linux users were not happy. But their frowns can now turn upside-down, as a support note for the forthcoming Dropbox version 77 client update published today says it will “add support for ZFS (on 64-bit systems only), eCryptFS, XFS(on 64-bit systems only), and Btrfs filesystems in Linux.” The post doesn’t explain Dropbox’s reasons for the change, but it’s not hard to guess its reasons.

  • Darling Progress Report Q2 2019

    James Urquhart's pull requests gave us more stubs for many frameworks including DrawSprocket, AGL, Carbon, CoreServices, and ApplicationServices. Wow, what a list, thank you James! James also fixed a very low level bug where system calls with large numbers of arguments wouldn't work properly for 32-bit applications. Finally, he fixed a problem where Darling was using clock_sleep instead of clock_nanosleep and a bug with the stat system call.

  • Darling Picks Up New Contributors For Its macOS Compatibility Layer On Linux

    Darling is the long-standing (albeit for some years idling) effort to allow macOS binaries to run on Linux that is akin to Wine but focused on an Apple macOS layer rather than Windows. This summer it's been moving along and seeing some new developer contributions. The Darling project just published their Q2 highlights with having new contributors onboard and making progress at varying levels of the stack. They have begun stubbing out more frameworks including AGL, Carbon, AddressBook, CoreServices, and ApplicationServices.

(GNU/)Linux on Devices: Librem/Purism, Congatec, Aaeon, Axiomtek

  • Librem One Design Principles: Simple, Secure Applications

    The primary appeal of Librem One is that you get privacy without sacrificing convenience. There is already a wealth of free software available, both applications and services, with numerous security and privacy options. However, learning what they are and keeping up-to-date is generally neither simple nor convenient.

  • Type 6 module adds support for 10 new Intel 9th Gen CPUs

    Congatec’s Linux-friendly “Conga-TS370” COM Express Type 6 module now supports 10 new 9th Gen Coffee Lake-H Refresh chips including a 4.1GHz hexa-core, dual-threaded i7-9850HL with a 25W TDP. There’s also a new Conga-TEVAL/COMe 3.0 carrier. Last month, Kontron announced that its Intel 8th Gen Coffee Lake based COMe-bCL6 COM Express Basic Type 6 module had been updated to support Intel’s 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh chips. Now, rival German embedded vendor Congatec has stepped up with its own 9th Gen refresh of its 8th Gen Conga-TS370 Basic Type 6 module. You can now order the Conga-TS370 with 14 Intel Core, Xeon, Pentium, and Celeron models, including 10 new 9th Gen chips.

  • Aaeon unveils first Kaby Lake based SDM-S display module

    Aaeon announced a Linux-ready Intel SDM-Small module with a 7th Gen Intel Core CPU. The credit card sized “ASDM-S-KBU” is designed for kiosks, vending machines, and signage applications. Earlier this month we started seeing the first products to support Intel’s 175 x 100 x 20mm Smart Display Module-Large form factor for easily serviceable and upgradable signage control boards. Nexcom’s NDiS S538 module runs on an Intel 6th Gen Core CPU and Axiomtek’s SDM500L taps the newer 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U. Now Aaeon has announced a board that adopts the smaller, 100 x 60 x 20mm Intel SDM-Small (SDM-S) spec. The ASDM-S-KBU is billed as the first SDM-S module based on a 7th Gen Kaby Lake chip.

  • Apollo Lake Pico-ITX SBC supplies mini-PCIe and M.2 expansion

    Axiomtek’s “PICO319” SBC is built around a quad-core Atom x5-E3940 SoC and offers 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, DP and LVDS, mini-PCIe and M.2, and -40 to 70°C support. The PICO319 is the latest of several Axiomtek Pico-ITX boards with an Intel Apollo Lake processor, including last year’s PICO316. The PICO319 incorporates the quad-core, up to 1.8GHz Atom x5-E3940 instead of the PICO316’s choice of a Pentium N4200 or Celeron N3350. The Atom x5-E3940 enables the PICO319 to support a wider temperature range of -40 to 70°C. No OS support was listed, but the earlier PICO316 supports Linux (Red Hat, Fedora, Ubuntu) and Windows.