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Mozilla: React, Firefox 67 Beta 10 Testday Results, and Privacy Rants

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Moz/FF
  • Peter Bengtsson: Whatsdeployed rewritten in React

    All old URLs will continue to work but now the canonical URL becomes /s/5HY/mozilla-services/tecken, for example. The :org/:repo isn't really necessary because the server knows exactly what 5HY (in this example means), but it's nice for the URL bar's memory.

    Another thing that changed was how it can recognize "bors commits". When you use bors, you put a bunch of commits into a GitHub Pull Request and then ask the bors bot to merge them into master. Using "bors mode" in Whatsdeployed is optional but we believe it looks a lot more user-friendly. Here is an example of mozilla/normandy with and without bors toggled on and off.

  • Firefox 67 Beta 10 Testday Results

    As you may already know, last Friday April 12th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 67 Beta 10.

    Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: Rok Žerdin, noelonassis, gaby2300, Kamila kamciatek

    From Mozilla Bangladesh Community: Sayed Ibn Masud, Md.Rahimul Islam, Shah Yashfique Bhuian, Maruf Rahman, Niyaz Bin Hashem, Md. Almas Hossain, Ummay hany eiti, Kazi Ashraf Hossain.

  • How you can take control against online tracking

    Picture this. You arrive at a website you’ve never been to before and the site is full of ads for things you’ve already looked at online. It’s not a difficult thing to imagine because it happens every day. It can feel creepy, especially if you don’t understand why you’re seeing those ads. It can be particularly uncomfortable when you start seeing ads that try to shape your political opinions. With elections coming up in the EU, Canada and the US, it’s important to understand how online tracking can influence you.

  • The Bug in Apple’s Latest Marketing Campaign [Ed: Mozilla calls out misleading ads from Apple, which is in NSA PRISM and is spying on people, putting back doors in everything and so on]

    Each iPhone that Apple sells comes with a unique ID (called an “identifier for advertisers” or IDFA), which lets advertisers track the actions users take when they use apps. It’s like a salesperson following you from store to store while you shop and recording each thing you look at. Not very private at all.

    The good news: You can turn this feature off. The bad news: Most people don’t know that feature even exists, let alone that they should turn it off. And we think that they shouldn’t have to.

    That’s why we’re asking Apple to change the unique IDs for each iPhone every month. You would still get relevant ads — but it would be harder for companies to build a profile about you over time.

  • Alex Gibson: My sixth year working at Mozilla

    This week marks my sixth year working at Mozilla! I’ll be honest, this year’s mozillaversary came by so fast I nearly forgot all about writing this blog post. It feels hard to believe that I’ve been working here for a full six years. I’ve guess grown and learned a lot in that time, but it still doesn’t feel like all that long ago when I first joined full time. Years start to blur together. So, what’s happened in this past 12 months?

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly with Aquameta and TLLTS (Linux Link Tech Show)

  • FLOSS Weekly 527: Aquameta Revisited
    Aquameta is a web development environment where instead of storing code as flat files in the file system, everything is stored in PostgreSQL as relational data, including source code, HTML, CSS, Javascript, images and other resources, system configurations, database schema, permissions and more.
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 806

GNOME Devs Mull Making Dedicated System Info Tool

Would you find the GNOME desktop more useful if it could tell you more about the system you’re running? If so, you may be interested to hear about a new app mooted by GNOME design team member Allan Day. Day proposes the creation of a new hardware diagnostics tool that would, in his words: “show technical details about the system and the available hardware. It would also include information about the firmware for your hardware, and allow blacklisting certain firmware versions.” Now, call me wrong — I usually am — but doesn’t that sounds like it would be mightily useful? Read more

Android Leftovers

OSS: Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW), Molly de Blanc on 'Breaking Up', Apache Software Foundation News and Beancount Examined

  • Business models and open source
    One of the more lively sessions that was held at the 2019 Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) was Heather Meeker's talk on open-source business models and alternative licensing. As a lawyer in private practice, Meeker worked on a number of the alternative licenses that were drafted and presented over the last year or so. But she is also part of a venture capital (VC) firm that is exclusively investing in companies focused on open source, so she has experience in thinking about what kinds of models actually work for those types of businesses. The LLW is organized annually by the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE). It is meant as a gathering for lawyers, engineers, and others interested in licensing topics. By default, sessions are run under the Chatham House Rule, which means that participants cannot be identified, either by name or affiliation. Meeker waived that rule for her talk, though those from the audience who made comments may or may not have waived the rule. Meeker acknowledged that her topic was controversial, but that she would be "your Beatrice [from the Divine Comedy] to the miasma of venture-backed open-source companies". Her slides were entitled "What color are your razor blades? FOSS business models". The title is referencing the famous What Color is Your Parachute? book for job seekers. The idea is to imagine an idea with specificity, so open-source companies need to imagine what they are selling (their "razor blades") with specificity in order to be successful. Otherwise, she said, they end up with the business model of the Underpants Gnomes ("1. Collect underpants, 2. ?, 3. Profit"). For a long time, there was a tendency for open-source entrepreneurs to equate "lots of downloads" with profit, which is more or less the same thing. That is not really going to happen unless a lot of thought is put into how the business will actually function.
  • Molly de Blanc: breaking up
    FLOSS is about choice (among other things). One of the things we get from developer freedom is the ability to specialize or have specialized technology — the development of features and tools, the fixing of bugs and anti-features.
  • Apache Software Foundation Advances Enterprise App Development With Top Level Projects
    The open source Netbeans Java Integrated Developer Environment (IDE) and SkyWalking application performance monitoring (APM) project efforts move forward. Open source is often at the core of modern enterprise applications and few if any organizations have as much impact as the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). The Apache Software Foundation runs its open source projects on a hierarchy of principally three levels, top-level projects (TLPs), sub-projects and incubated projects. Achieving the TLP status is a major milestone for an open source effort. Among the projects that have recently achieved TLP status is the Apache Netbeans Java Integrated Developer Environment (IDE) and the Apache Skywalking application performance monitoring (APM) efforts.
  • Counting corporate beans
    Some things simply take time. When your editor restarted the search for a free accounting system, he had truly hoped to be done by now. But life gets busy, and accounting systems are remarkably prone to falling off the list of things one wants to deal with in any given day. On the other hand, accounting can return to that list quickly whenever LWN's proprietary accounting software does something particularly obnoxious. This turns out to be one of those times, so your editor set out to determine whether beancount could do the job. Beancount was already covered here almost exactly one year ago, but that review was focused on personal finances; company accounting has a different set of requirements. That article is worth reviewing, though, as the material covered there will (mostly) not be repeated here. Here, instead, the emphasis will be on what a simple business needs. At the top of the list is the ability to import data into the system and to get it back out again. An ongoing business has a long accounting history that needs to be present going forward. Beancount keeps all of its data in a plain-text file with a well-documented format, so both import and export are relatively easy. Building on the the tools written to extract data from QuickBooks, your editor was able to write a script to import the accounting database into beancount over the course of an hour or two.