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Ubuntu 19.04 comes refreshed with the Linux 5.0 kernel

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Ubuntu

The heart of the Linux desktop beats on with the latest release of Canonical's Ubuntu distribution: Ubuntu 19.04. But, in addition, the server version comes ready with the latest cloud and container tools.

Now, if you're using Ubuntu in production, you probably should stick with the Long Term Support Ubuntu 18.04. After all, it comes with ten years of support. But there's a lot of tempting goodness in Disco Dingo, Ubuntu 19.04's playful moniker.

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Ubuntu Linux 19.04 'Disco Dingo' is finally available

  • Ubuntu Linux 19.04 'Disco Dingo' is finally available for download

    Christmas. Thanksgiving. Ubuntu release day. What do those three things have in common? They are days that cause many people to get excited. Back in the day, computer users would get excited about a new version of Windows too, such as Windows 95, XP, and 7 to name a few. Since Windows 8, however, Microsoft's new operating systems are hardly a reason for celebration. New versions of Ubuntu, the extremely popular Linux-based operating system, does pique the interest of many, including yours truly.

    Today, Linux users around the world should celebrate, as Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" is finally here! Following the Beta release, the stable version is now available for download. Keep in mind, version 19.04 is not LTS (Long Term Support), meaning it is only supported until January 2020.

Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) Is Now Available to Download

  • Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) Is Now Available to Download

    Six months in development, the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) opertating system is finally here and you can download it right now for Desktop and Server, as well as all official flavors, including Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio.

    The Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) release is powered by the most recent Linux 5.0 kernel series and ships with some of the latest software releases and GNU/Linux technologies, including the GNOME 3.32, MATE 1.22, and KDE Plasma 5.15 desktop environments, LibreOffice 6.2 office suite, and Mozilla Firefox 66 web browser.

Disco Dingo fever: Ubuntu 19.04 has an infrastructure bent...

  • Disco Dingo fever: Ubuntu 19.04 has an infrastructure bent, snappier GNOME and another stupid name

    Pull on those flares and perch atop your most precipitous platforms – Canonical has emitted Ubuntu 19.04, aka "Disco Dingo", with its sights set firmly on infrastructure.

    Although, as this is not a Long Term Support (LTS) version, enterprises are likely to hold off a while – the Dingo is only getting support until January 2020. If you need LTS, then Ubuntu recommends sticking with 18.04 LTS instead.

    However, if you cannot wait to get your hands on the new shiny, there are all manner of toys in the box with which to play.

Xubuntu 19.04 Is Ready With To Provide...Desktop Experience

  • Xubuntu 19.04 Is Ready With To Provide Its Updated Lightweight Xfce Desktop Experience

    While it may not seem like a big release with Xfce 4.14 having yet to materialize, the Xubuntu developers have been doing a fine job providing a nice upgrade with Xubuntu 19.04 for those appreciating a lightweight, GTK-based desktop environment built around Ubuntu.

    Xubuntu 19.04 is available today as part of the Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" launch and it ships with the very latest Xfce package releases, new wallpapers/artwork, GIMP has been re-added to the ISO after a four year hiatus, LibreOffice Impress now ships on their ISO, and various settings changes. Most notably though is just all of the latest Xfce packages released over the past six months on the road towards Xfce 4.14.

Disco Dingo brings usual Ubuntu trademark tweaks

  • Disco Dingo brings usual Ubuntu trademark tweaks

    Ubuntu is now under the control of this platoon and I expect discipline. It's understood that the barracks will be visited by Major Update today, so FAAAAALL IN!

    Now, we've had a dossier from Commander Shuttleworth which gives details of exactly what you can expect during Major Update's visit.

    Firstly, let's deal with cypher execution. This is a .04 release. That means it's not Long Term Supported, but rather the most cutting edge offering yet from Ubuntu.

More derivatives released of Ubuntu 19.04

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Released With Plenty Of Features, Download Link

    Ubuntu 19.04 is officially available out for the public. Ubuntu 19.04 will be supported for 9 months until January 2020. Ubuntu 19.04 ships with the latest GNOME desktop 3.32.

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Released: Download For Linux 5.0, GNOME 3.32 And More Features

    Ubuntu 19.04 comes with its fair share of significant changes. So, let’s discuss some of the important ones. Most of these changes are related to the default Ubuntu Desktop version that ships with GNOME shell.

  • What's New In Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo)

    Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) will be released today. Read on if you want to see what new features and improvements are included with this new Ubuntu release.

    This Ubuntu version is supported until January 2020. For a longer supported release, use Ubuntu 18.04 LTS instead, which is supported until April 2023.

  • Xubuntu 19.04: The Exhaustive Update

    Xubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” is just around the corner. It features numerous updates and an updated snapshot of Xfce 4.14 development. If you want to see all the changes, you’ve come to the right place!

  • Ubuntu MATE 19.04 Final Release

    Let’s rip that band-aid off and get this over quickly. Ubuntu MATE 19.04 is shipping with MATE Desktop 1.20. Albeit, the latest maintenance release of MATE Desktop 1.20 with some of the bug fixes and new features from MATE Desktop 1.22 included. In fact, the version of MATE Desktop being shipped in 19.04 is derived from the same MATE packages that will feature in the upcoming Debian 10 (Buster) release.

    You may be wondering why we’re not shipping MATE Desktop 1.22? The answer, stability. MATE Desktop 1.22 introduces some underlying API changes in core components and while all first party MATE Desktop applications are compatible with the changes and completely stable, some third party applications are not. Some third party applications are big crashers now and we’ve not been able to fix them in time.

  • 15 Things I Did Post Ubuntu 19.04 Installation

    Ubuntu 19.04, codenamed "Disco Dingo", is well on its way. I've been on Ubuntu 19.04 since its first Alpha, and this has been a rock solid release as far I'm concerned. Changes in Ubuntu 19.04 are more evolutionary though, but availability of the latest Linux Kernel version 5.0 is significant. New wallpapers are pretty great too.

Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo)

  • Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) released

    Codenamed "Disco Dingo", 19.04 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition
    of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a
    high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at
    work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    The Ubuntu kernel has been updated to the 5.0 based Linux kernel,
    our default toolchain has moved to gcc 8.3 with glibc 2.29, and we've
    also updated to openssl 1.1.1b and gnutls 3.6.5 with TLS1.3 support.

Ubuntu 19.04 Released As A Big Linux Desktop Improvement

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Released As A Big Linux Desktop Improvement Thanks To GNOME 3.32

    The Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" has been officially released as the latest non-LTS, six-month installment to Ubuntu Linux.

    Ubuntu 19.04 on the desktop front is a big step forward thanks to the use of GNOME 3.32. GNOME 3.32 has turned out superb and offers better performance, better Wayland support, CPU/GPU handling improvements, fractional scaling for HiDPI displays, and many other improvements.

Ubuntu 19.04 'Disco Dingo' Has Arrived: Downloads Available Now!

  • Ubuntu 19.04 'Disco Dingo' Has Arrived: Downloads Available Now!

    Unlike Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, this will not be supported for 10 years. Instead, the non-LTS 19.04 will be supported for 9 months until January 2020.

    So, if you have a production environment, we may not recommend upgrading it right away. For example, if you have a server that runs on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS – it may not be a good idea to upgrade it to 19.04 just because it is an exciting release.

    However, for users who want the latest and greatest installed on their machines can try it out.

First Look: Ubuntu 19.04: What’s New? [Video]

  • First Look: Ubuntu 19.04: What’s New? [Video]

    Ubuntu 19.04 ‘Disco Dingo’ is (very nearly) here, serving as latest version of the Ubuntu operating system — but what’s changed?

    Well, honestly: not much. The Disco Dingo dances to a subtle beat, favouring modest evolution over dramatic dance floor revolution.

Yet more coverage and derivatives

  • What's new in Ubuntu 19.04

    In this video, we look at what is new in Ubuntu 19.04.

  • What to do after installing Ubuntu 19.04

    In this video, we look at some of the new features in Ubuntu 19.04.

  • Lubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) Released!

    Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, Lubuntu 19.04 has been released! With the codename Disco Dingo, Lubuntu 19.04 is the 16th release of Lubuntu and the second release of Lubuntu with LXQt as the default desktop environment.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Be The Eoan ________

    With Ubuntu 19.04 out the door, it's time to kick off Ubuntu 19.10 as the next six-month installment of Ubuntu Linux and the last before Ubuntu 20.04 as the next LTS release.

    The full codename of Ubuntu 19.10 has yet to be revealed, but it will start with "Eoan." Ubuntu Eoan is now in the archive and this distro-info-data bug report from today confirms it will be EOAN EANIMAL. Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu's codename'r in chief (among other roles), has yet to officially announce the EE codename or cycle objectives.

  • Ubuntu 19.04 'Disco Dingo' Released
  • Ubuntu 19.04 overview | Fast, secure and simple.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Ubuntu 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Ubuntu Budgie 19.04 Released with Budgie 10.5 Desktop and Brand-New Theme

    The Ubuntu Budgie 19.04 operating system arrived today as part of the major Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) release, adding several new features, a new look, and other improvements.

    Shipping with the latest Budgie 10.5 desktop environment by default with the latest budgie-applets, the Ubuntu Budgie 19.04 operating system replaces the Nautilus file manager with Nemo from the Cinnamon desktop environment as it retains desktop icons capability and integrates with the Catfish search utility.

  • Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Canonical released today Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), the latest version of one of the world's most popular Linux-based operating systems incorporating the newest GNU/Linux technologies and the most recent Open Source software.
    The 30th release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, Ubuntu 19.04, is dubbed as the Disco Dingo because it's a fun release consisting of up-to-date components. It's a release for the bleeding-edge Ubuntu user who wants to have the latest GNU/Linux software and technologies on his/her personal computer.

    Ubuntu 19.04 has been in development during the past six months and it's the obvious upgrade to last year's Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release. Of course, users can also update from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) or a previous LTS release, but it's not recommended to do so because of the short lifespan.

  • How To Upgrade Ubuntu 18.10 To Ubuntu 19.04?

    Ubuntu 18.10, the latest release of the world’s most popular open source operating system, is finally here. Codenamed Disco Dingo, this Linux distro comes with major changes like Linux 5.0, GNOME 3.32, Mesa 18.0, etc.

    If you haven’t tried Linux and you’re willing to make a change, Ubuntu is a fine place to start. However, there are many other beginner-friendly distros as well that you can try. In any case, all the distros have detailed documentation on their websites that you can follow and start your Linux journey.

  • Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" Released, Eclipse Foundation's 2019 IoT Developer Survey Results, OpenSSH 8.0 Now Available, digiKam 6.1.0 Is Out and Three New openSUSE Tumbleweeds Released

    Canonical this morning announced the release of Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo". According to the press release, Ubuntu 19.04 is "on open infrastructure deployments, the developer desktop, IoT, and cloud to edge software distribution". Of the release, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth says, "The open-source-first on Ubuntu movement in telco, finance, and media has spread to other sectors. From the public cloud to the private data center to the edge appliance or cluster, open source has become the reference for efficiency and innovation. Ubuntu 19.04 includes the leading projects to underpin that transition, and the developer tooling to accelerate the applications for those domains". You can download Ubuntu 19.04 from here.

  • Ubuntu Studio 19.04 Released!

    The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 19.04, code-named “Disco Dingo”. This marks Ubuntu Studio’s 25th release, and is its largest and most feature-full release in a long while. This release is a regular release and as such, it is supported for 9 months.

    For those requiring longer-term support, we encourage you to install Ubuntu Studio 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” and add the Ubuntu Studio Backports PPA, which will keep 18.04 supported through April 2020. Please do not install Ubuntu Studio 16.04 LTS anymore as it reaches end-of-life (EOL) on April 21, 2019.

    Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes for a complete list of changes and known issues.

What’s New In Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo”

  • What’s New In Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo”

    Honestly speaking, this release does not ship with a huge list of new features. Actually, there are a few new things that you won’t even notice easily without reading a review. So you must be thinking that it’s not even worth reading a review then. Well, not really.

    Ubuntu 19.04 might not ship with so much cool stuff for your eyes, but it does make Ubuntu better by improving its performance to a great level. You will quickly notice improved performance on the very first boot.

    And that’s what we have been noticing for the past few Ubuntu releases. It is more focusing on performance rather than pre-loading your system with new features. But don’t worry the new features are also worth checking out.

'Ubuntu 19.04 Makes Linux a Snap' by Sean Michael Kerner

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Makes Linux a Snap

    Canonical announced the release of the open-source Ubuntu 19.04 Linux distribution on April 18, with new versions for cloud, server and desktop users.

    The Ubuntu 19.04 update is code-named the "Disco Dingo" and is a standard release, which means Canonical will support it for nine months. The 19.04 update is largely an evolutionary step forward, extending features that Ubuntu has been building on for the last several releases. Among the most noteworthy aspects of Ubuntu 19.04's evolutionary path is the use of "snaps," an approach for packaging, delivering and updating software in a highly agile manner.

    In a video interview with eWEEK, Ubuntu and Canonical founder Mark Shuttleworth outlines the growing importance of snaps in the Ubuntu 19.04 update.

Xubuntu 19.04 released!

  • Xubuntu 19.04 released!

    The Xubuntu team is happy to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 19.04!

    Xubuntu 19.04 is a regular release and will be supported for 9 months, until January 2020. If you need a stable environment with longer support time, we recommend that you use Xubuntu 18.04 LTS instead.

    The final release images are available as torrents and direct downloads from xubuntu.org/getxubuntu/

    As the main server might be busy in the first few days after the release, we recommend using the torrents if possible.

Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) Desktop Installation Guide

Xubuntu 19.04/Ubuntu19.04 releases

  • Xubuntu 19.04 releases with latest Xfce package releases, new wallpapers and more

    The team behind Xubuntu, have released a new update for the lightweight, GTK-based desktop environment built around Ubuntu. Xubuntu 19.04 is available since yesterday as a part of the Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” launch. New features include latest Xfce package releases, new wallpapers/artwork, re-addition of GIMP to ISO, and various other changes. Xubuntu 19.04 also halts the production of x86 32-bit install images.

  • Canonical announces Ubuntu 19.04 - Software - Press Release

    Ubuntu 19.04 integrates recent innovations from key open infrastructure projects - like OpenStack, Kubernetes, and Ceph - with advanced life-cycle management for multi-cloud and on-prem operations - from bare metal, VMware and OpenStack to every major public cloud.

    OpenStack Stein brings AI and NFV hardware acceleration with GPGPU and FPGA passthrough. Ceph Mimic provides multi-site replication and the latest Kubernetes 1.14 enables enterprise storage and the new containerd direct runtime.

    Optimised Ubuntu Server 19.04 and Minimal Ubuntu 19.04 images are available on all major public clouds.

More from Joey Sneddon

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Flavours Available to Download

    Ubuntu 19.04 is out, and so too are new versions of official ubuntu flavors, including Ubuntu MATE, Kubuntu, Xubuntu and more. We recap the key changes.

  • 10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 19.04

    In this article we share our list of essential things to do after you install (or upgrade) to Ubuntu 19.04.

    That’s not to say Ubuntu isn’t perfectly usable out of the box — it is — but with a couple of post-install tweaks you can easily get more from it.

    We’ve published one of these ‘things to do after installing Ubuntu’ articles for the past 20 Ubuntu releases, starting way back in 2009 with the launch of Ubuntu 9.04 ‘Jaunty Jackalope’.

    While the exact list of ‘things to do’ changes for each release but our overall aim hasn’t: we list practical, actionable items rather than idly suggesting “zomg ruin ur desktop by adding alpha software!!1” tweaks.

  • First Half of Ubuntu 19.10 Codename Revealed, And It’s Obscure

    The first part of the Ubuntu 19.10 codename has been revealed — but it’s probably not a word any of us would’ve guessed!

    Yes, I know: you’ve barely had time to soak up all of the Ubuntu 19.04 features on offer in the latest release, yet planning for the next version of Ubuntu is already underway!

More Ubuntu 19.04

  • Ubuntu 19.04 released with focus on IoTs, open infrastructure

    Canonical has rolled out a new version of its Ubuntu software.

  • Pydio: How to Install on Windows 10 or Ubuntu 19.04
  • SD Times news digest: Ubuntu 19.04, Zephyr LTS release, and Mozilla’s Pyodide project

    Canonical, providers of the Ubuntu operating system, released version 19.04 of its flagship product, which focuses on open infrastructure, developer desktop and IoT.

    Ubuntu 19.04 integrates innovative open infrastructure projects such as OpenStack, Kubernetes and Ceph with advanced life-cycle management for multi-cloud and on-prem operations. In 19.04, multiple instances of the same snap can be installed for CI/CD, testing or phased rollouts.

    In addition, Ubuntu 19.04 introduces GNOME 3.32, a free and open-source desktop environment with higher frame rates, quicker icon load times and reduced CPU/GPU load, and smoother startup animations than earlier versions.

  • How to install Plex media server on Ubuntu 19.04 -Simplest method

    Are you looking for the simplest and easiest method to install Plex Media Server on Ubuntu 19.04? Here is that. Single command of snap will setup Plex server for you…

    Plex Media server doesn’t need an introduction however, those are not acquainted with it; the Plex Server is a software which is free to use and cross-platform. This means it is available for Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, NAS and MacOS along with a wide range of Client apps to stream videos from Plex Medi server. Not only videos, but the users can also stream music files too locally as well as remotely along with TV shows, and photos on PC, Chromecast, Android or iOS smartphone, tablet, ROKU etc.

    We are going to use the Snap package manager for the installation Plex server here. The benefit of using SNAP is it makes everything so simple. No need to download and install each file separately.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo,” Available Now

Latest coverage of Ubuntu 19.04 Release

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 19.04?

    If you like shiny new software, you may already know that Canonical just launched a new version of Ubuntu. It may be exciting, but is it worth the upgrade? The same question applies if you’re one of those people that don’t care about new things. Your old(er) Ubuntu installation gets the job done. But does version 19.04 solve any problems you currently have?

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Release | Stephan Fabel – Director Of Product – Canonical Ltd

    Ubuntu 19.04 integrates recent innovations from key open infrastructure projects – like OpenStack, Kubernetes, and Ceph – with advanced life-cycle management for multi-cloud and on-prem operations – from bare metal, VMware and OpenStack to every major public cloud. OpenStack Stein brings AI and NFV hardware acceleration with GPGPU and FPGA passthrough. Ceph Mimic provides multi-site replication and the latest Kubernetes 1.14 enables enterprise storage and the new containerd direct runtime. Optimised Ubuntu Server 19.04 and Minimal Ubuntu 19.04 images are available on all major public clouds.

  • 开源基础设施,桌面和物联网开发者都聚焦在Ubuntu 19.04 [Ed: Canonical has been producing many articles like these lately. Aiming at new markets.]

Additional press coverage

  • Ubuntu 19.04 is here

    Ubuntu 19.04 integrates recent updates from open infrastructure projects including OpenStack, Kubernetes, and Ceph – with advanced life-cycle management for multi-cloud and on-prem operations – from bare metal, VMware and OpenStack to every major public cloud.

    Optimised Ubuntu Server 19.04 and Minimal Ubuntu 19.04 images are available on all major public clouds.

    Amazon published Greengrass for IoT on Ubuntu, as well as launching the AWS DeepRacer developer-centric model for autonomous ground vehicle community development, also running Ubuntu.

    The Edge X stack and a range of industrial control capabilities are now available for integration on Ubuntu based devices, with long term security updates.

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Lands: Here’s What’s New

    Canonical has released Ubuntu 19.04, the latest iteration of the open source Linux distribution, with a range of infrastructure-focussed upgrades including improved life-cycle management for multicloud and on-prem operations; from bare metal, VMware and OpenStack to every major public cloud.

    Ubuntu 19.04 (dubbed “Disco Dingo”) also uses Linux Kernel 5.0 so users can expect better hardware support and performance improvement. It also supports the latest Kubernetes release for containers orchestration.

    (Notably, Canonical as of late March also offers full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.14 using kubeadm deployments, its Charmed Kubernetes, and MicroK8s, its popular single-node deployment of Kubernetes.)

LTS Releases of Ubuntu Still Necessary?

Download Links

Ubuntu MATE 19.04 Final Release

  • Ubuntu MATE 19.04 Final Release

    Those of you who follow the desktop Linux news will know that upstream MATE Desktop recently released version 1.22.

    Let’s rip that band-aid off and get this over quickly. Ubuntu MATE 19.04 is shipping with MATE Desktop 1.20. Albeit, the latest maintenance release of MATE Desktop 1.20 with some of the bug fixes and new features from MATE Desktop 1.22 included. In fact, the version of MATE Desktop being shipped in 19.04 is derived from the same MATE packages that will feature in the upcoming Debian 10 (Buster) release.

  • Ubuntu MATE 19.04 Brings Improved Out of Box Nvidia GPU Experience for Gamers

    Powered by the stable and well-tested MATE 1.20.4 desktop environment with some improvements and new features from the MATE 1.22 release, which needs more testing to be eligible for inclusion in future Ubuntu MATE release, the Ubuntu MATE 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system adds major improvements for owners of AMD Radeon and Nvidia graphics cards.

More on Xubuntu 19.04 today

  • Xubuntu 19.04 Drops Support for 32-Bit Systems, Ships with Xfce 4.13.3 Desktop

    Xubuntu 19.04 arrived as part of the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system series bringing some important changes to this lightweight official Ubuntu Linux flavor.

    Xubuntu 19.04 is here as the first release of the lightweight Ubuntu flavor based on the Xfce desktop environment to no longer offer 32-bit ISO images that would allow users to install the Linux-based operating system on computers from 15 or 20 years ago. Xubuntu 19.04 is now only supported on 64-bit systems.

    "In December, the team voted to discontinue 32-bit images for Xubuntu 19.04 and forward. If you want to continue using Xubuntu with 32-bit architectures, Xubuntu 18.04 is supported for 3 years, and the Xubuntu package set can be installed from the Minimal CD," said the development team in the release notes.

Ubuntu Kylin 19.04 Final Now Available for Download!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 19.04 Final Now Available for Download!

    In April 19th, 2019, We are glad to announce the official release of opensource operating system Ubuntu Kylin 19.04(Disco Dingo). In this version, OS stability is our first goal to obtain. In order to provide a better experience for users, a series of improvements are made on system kernel, basic service, desktop environment and specialized apps. In addition, other opensource distribution such as Ubuntu 19.04、Lubuntu 19.04 and Ubuntu Mate 19.04 are released in the same time.

  • Ubuntu Kylin 19.04 Adds a New Visual Experience, Latest WPS Office Suite

    Featuring the same internal improvements as the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system, Ubuntu Kylin 19.04 shops with a fresh and all-new visual experience through a unified style that revamps the boot animation, login and lock screens, adds a transparency effect to the applications menu, notification area, and taskbar, as well as other smaller enhancements.

    "We are bringing a whole new visual experience in this distribution, from system choice, boot up animation, log in program to system desktop, a unified style is presented. Amazing transparency effect is utilized on start menu, taskbar and notification area, give your desktop a sense of technology," reads the release announcement.

Kubuntu 19.04 Ships with KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop

  • Kubuntu 19.04 Ships with KDE Plasma 5.15 Desktop, Experimental Wayland Session

    Featuring the same internal changes as Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), the Kubuntu 19.04 operating system is here to offers users an updated KDE experience powered by the KDE Plasma 5.15.4 desktop environment and KDE Applications 18.12.3 software suite, built against the Qt 5.12.2 application framework.

    Of course, several of the pre-installed applications have received updated versions as part of the Kubuntu 19.04 release, including Mozilla Firefox 66.0 as default web browser and LibreOffice 6.2.2 as default office suite. The Latte Dock 0.8.8, KDevelop 5.3.2, and Krita 4.1.7 apps are also available.

Lubuntu 19.04 Released with Latest LXQt Desktop and more

  • Lubuntu 19.04 Released with Latest LXQt Desktop and Calamares Installer

    Bundled with the same new features and improvements implemented by Canonical in the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system series, Lubuntu 19.04 is here as the second Lubuntu release to ship with the modern and lightweight LXQt desktop environment by default as the development team's focus is now only on LXQt, not the old LXDE desktop environment, which is no longer supported.

    "This is the second Lubuntu release with LXQt as the main desktop environment. The Lubuntu project, in 18.10 and successive releases, will no longer support the LXDE desktop environment or tools in the Ubuntu archive, and will instead focus on the LXQt desktop environment," said developer Simon Quigley in the release announcement.

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    At the beginning of this month, I started testing out the new producer as I had a good, rough structure for the producer code, and was only facing a few minor problems. Initially, I was unclear about how exactly the producer is going to be used by the titler so I took a small step back and spent some time figuring out how kdenlivetitle worked, which is the producer in use. Initially, I faced integration problems (which are the ones you’d normally expect) when I tried to make use of the QmlRenderer library for rendering and loading QML templates – and most of them were resolved by a simple refactoring of the QmlRenderer library source code. To give an example, the producer traditionally stores the QML template in global variables which is taken as a character pointer argument (which is, again, traditional C) The QmlRenderer lib takes a QUrl as its parameters for loading the Qml file, so to solve this problem all I had to do was to overload the loadQml() method with one which could accommodate the producer’s needs – which worked perfectly fine. As a consequence, I also had to compartmentalise (further) the rendering process so now we have 3 methods which go sequentially when we want to render something using the library ( initialiseRenderParams( ) -> prepareRenderer( ) -> renderQml( ) ) [...] The problem was resolved (thank you JB) finally and it was not due to OpenGL but it was simply because I hadn’t created an QApplication for the producer (which is necessary for qt producers). The whole month’s been a steep curve, definitely not easy, but, I enjoyed it! Right now, I have a producer which is, now, almost complete and with a little more tweaking, will be put to use, hopefully. I’m still facing a few minor issues which I hope to resolve soon and get a working producer. Once we get that, I can start work on the Kdenlive side. Let’s hope for the best!

  • How to Make a Discord Bot in Python

    In a world where video games are so important to so many people, communication and community around games are vital. Discord offers both of those and more in one well-designed package. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to make a Discord bot in Python so that you can make the most of this fantastic platform.

  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.4 RC Released

    The Visual Studio Project System is widely used as the build system of choice for C++ projects in VS. Under the hood, MSBuild provides the project file format and build framework. The Qt VS Tools make use of the extensibility of MSBuild to provide design-time and build-time integration of Qt in VS projects — toward the end of the post we have a closer look at how that integration works and what changed in the new release. Up to this point, the Qt VS Tools extension managed its own project settings in an isolated manner. This approach prevented the integration of Qt in Visual Studio to fully benefit from the features of VS projects and MSBuild. Significantly, it was not possible to have Qt settings vary according to the build configuration (e.g. having a different list of selected Qt modules for different configurations), including Qt itself: only one version/build of Qt could be selected and would apply to all configurations, a significant drawback in the case of multi-platform projects. Another important limitation that users of the Qt VS Tools have reported is the lack of support for importing Qt-related settings from shared property sheet files. This feature allows settings in VS projects to be shared within a team or organization, thus providing a single source for that information. Up to now, this was not possible to do with settings managed by the Qt VS Tools.

Screenshots/Screencasts: 10 GNU/Linux Distros (Screenshots) and New Screencast/Video of Endeavour OS 2019.08.17

  • 10 Linux distros: From different to dangerous

    One of the great benefits of Linux is the ability to roll your own. Throughout the years, individuals, organizations, and even nation states have done just that. In this gallery, we're going to showcase some of those distros. Be careful, though. You may not want to load these, or if you do, put them in isolated VMs. We're not kidding when we say they could be dangerous.

  • Endeavour OS 2019.08.17 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Endeavour OS 2019.08.17.

A Cycle of Renewal, Broken: How Big Tech and Big Media Abuse Copyright Law to Slay Competition

In 1950, a television salesman named Robert Tarlton put together a consortium of TV merchants in the town of Lansford, Pennsylvania to erect an antenna tall enough to pull down signals from Philadelphia, about 90 miles to the southeast. The antenna connected to a web of cables that the consortium strung up and down the streets of Lansford, bringing big-city TV to their customers — and making TV ownership for Lansfordites far more attractive. Though hobbyists had been jury-rigging their own "community antenna television" networks since 1948, no one had ever tried to go into business with such an operation. The first commercial cable TV company was born. The rise of cable over the following years kicked off decades of political controversy over whether the cable operators should be allowed to stay in business, seeing as they were retransmitting broadcast signals without payment or permission and collecting money for the service. Broadcasters took a dim view of people using their signals without permission, which is a little rich, given that the broadcasting industry itself owed its existence to the ability to play sound recordings over the air without permission or payment. The FCC brokered a series of compromises in the years that followed, coming up with complex rules governing which signals a cable operator could retransmit, which ones they must retransmit, and how much all this would cost. The end result was a second way to get TV, one that made peace with—and grew alongside—broadcasters, eventually coming to dominate how we get cable TV in our homes. By 1976, cable and broadcasters joined forces to fight a new technology: home video recorders, starting with Sony's Betamax recorders. In the eyes of the cable operators, broadcasters, and movie studios, these were as illegitimate as the playing of records over the air had been, or as retransmitting those broadcasts over cable had been. Lawsuits over the VCR continued for the next eight years. In 1984, the Supreme Court finally weighed in, legalizing the VCR, and finding that new technologies were not illegal under copyright law if they were "capable of substantial noninfringing uses." Read more

Software, HowTos and Storage

  • Pause Music When Locking The Screen And Resume On Unlock For Spotify, Rhythmbox, Others

    When you lock your computer screen (without suspending the system), most desktop audio players continue playback in the background, sometimes not emitting any sound ¹. Due to this you may unintentionally skip parts of podcasts or songs in a playlist, etc. Enter pause-on-lock, a Bash script that pauses your music player when you lock the screen and resumes playback once the screen is unlocked. pause-on-lock works on Unity, GNOME, Cinnamon and MATE desktop environments, and by default it supports Spotify and Rhythmbox. With the help of playerctl (a command line controller for controlling media players that support the MPRIS D-Bus interface), this script can extend its supported music players to many others, including Audacious, VLC, Cmus, and others.

  • Easy Way to Screen Mirroring Android on Ubuntu!

    Screen Mirroring is one of the features found on smartphones, one of which is on Android. This feature serves to display the smartphone to a computer. This is very useful for example when used for demo applications that you make, or maybe for other things related to smartphones. In Ubuntu, we can do screen mirroring with applications available on Android, for example is AirDroid which can be used for screen mirroring through a browser. But I feel less optimal when using this instant method. Because there is a lag between activity on the smartphone and on the monitor screen on the computer, and the results are less than optimal. What might be the cause because it is opened through a browser and uses wi-fi? (Personal question). I am looking for another application for screen mirroring on Ubuntu, and one of the very good applications is Scrcpy. This application can be used for screen mirroring without a root device.

  • Command line quick tips: Searching with grep
  • How to Install Cezerin on Debian 9
  • How to Create a Bootable USB Stick from the Ubuntu Terminal
  • How to Install Git on Debian 10
  • How to Copy/Move a Docker Container to Another Host
  • Six practical use cases for Nmap
  • The Next Stage of Flash Storage: Computational Storage
  • NAS upgrade

    At some point in the future I hope to spend a little bit of time on the software side of things, as some of the features of my set up are no longer working as they should: I can't remote-decrypt the main disk via SSH on boot, and the first run of any backup fails due to some kind of race condition in the systemd unit dependencies. (The first attempt does not correctly mount the backup partition; the second attempt always succeeds).

  • Storage Concepts And Technologies Explained In Detail