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The testimony of 7-year-old Rory Reiser emerged Tuesday as a key factor in the case against Oakland software developer Hans Reiser on charges that he murdered his estranged wife Nina Reiser, who was last seen alive on Sept. 3.

At the end of the sixth day of a preliminary hearing that will determine if there's enough evidence to order Hans Reiser to stand trial, attorneys said his son Rory Reiser currently is in Russia with Nina Reiser's mother, but will return to the witness stand at the request of Alameda County Superior Court Judge Julie Conger when the hearing resumes on Jan. 16.

Rory Reiser testified on Dec. 11 on the first day of his father's hearing, which is playing out over a period of days due to the schedules of the attorneys in the case.

Conger said Tuesday that she expects the hearing to conclude on Jan. 16 and she will make a ruling at that time.

The press and public will be barred from Rory Reiser's testimony.

Son's Testimony May Be Key In Reiser Murder Hearing


An Oakland computer programmer accused of killing his wife appeared nervous and didn't make eye contact with an employee at his children's after-school program two days after his estranged wife was last seen, the employee testified Tuesday.

Hans Reiser's wife, Nina Reiser, didn't pick up her children as scheduled Sept. 5, Natalie Potter testified on the sixth day of Hans Reiser's preliminary hearing in Alameda County Superior Court.

Instead, Hans Reiser showed up at Adventure Time at Joaquin Miller Elementary School in Oakland, looking "very nervous-like, his head down, his body moving from side to side," Potter said. "No eye contact with me at all."

Missing woman's husband nervous, witness says


Three days after Hans Reiser's wife was reported missing, the computer software designer drove to Barnes and Noble in Berkeley and purchased two books: "Homicide" and "Masterpieces of Murder," a police sergeant said in court Tuesday.

But unlike his previous purchases at the national bookseller, Reiser chose not to use his Barnes and Noble membership card, which gives customers a discount while also recording a history of their purchases, the sergeant said.

That tidbit of evidence and Reiser's erratic behavior on the same day that his wife was reported missing were presented to Alameda County Superior Court Judge Julie Conger during Reiser's preliminary hearing on charges of murder.

Police believe Reiser killed his wife, Nina Reiser, even though her body has never been found. Nina Reiser was last seen about 2 p.m. on Sept. 3 when she dropped off the couple's two children, ages 5 and 7, at Hans Reiser's home on the 6900 block of Exeter Drive.

DA case looks at Reiser's actions


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