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Survey: Linux reaching critical mass

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OSS

Nearly half of all enterprises will be running mission-critical business applications on Linux in five years' time. That's according to a survey of IT directors, vice-presidents and CIOs (chief information officers) carried out by Saugatuck Research, which questioned 133 businesses worldwide.

The company predicts a steep rise: only 18 percent of businesses will be using Linux in business-critical roles by the end of 2007.

"Linux OSes [operating systems] – and open source-based software in general – have reached critical marketplace mass," said the study's authors, Bruce Guptill and Bill McNee of Saugatuck Research.

Full Story.


Also:

Around 25% of enterprises will be running mission-critical business application on Linux platforms by 2009.

The prediction comes from analyst Saugatuck Technology, as a result of joint research with BusinessWeek Research Services.

The researchers questioned over 130 firms and also found that 45% of enterprises will be using Linux to run critical applications by 2011. At the end of this year, 18% will be relying on Linux for critical applications.

Quarter of firms on Linux by 2009, say analysts


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