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30 Days In GNOME vs. 3 Days In KDE

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Software

At the end of 2006, I prepared myself for a "survival experiment". Using a fresh Slackware 11 install (on the laptop), I decided not to touch my home desktop for a week (which features GNOME under Debian testing-unstable, and was still up and running for routing purposes), and only use WindowMaker (with ROX-Filer for a more pleasant experience) the whole week, as a way to make me "forget" my typical GNOME habits.

After a week, I switched to KDE for 3 days, on the same laptop.

— § —
The idea of making this experiment came from an article I've read in the British LXF #87, pages 56-59: «30 Days With GNOME», by Graham Morrison. After having read how a KDE fan was able to "survive" after a month of immersion in GNOME, I thought I could undergo a similar, though opposite process: how can a GNOME fanboy survive in KDE?

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RE: Beranger planet visited ?

Has anyone ever succeeded in knowing me?! Big Grin

mouais

Un tout petit astéroïde, oui Wink

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