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Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

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GNU
Linux

The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 – 64bit ISO.

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Coverage by Brian Fagioli

  • Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Arch-based Linux distribution available for download

    Rolling release operating systems are really cool, because they are constantly being updated. This can ensure that the user is kept up-to-date without effort. Why is that good? Well, vulnerabilities are patched quickly, while the latest and greatest features of popular programs are regularly introduced. Of course, there is a potential downside too -- it could introduce bugs that could lead to instability. Ultimately, the user must decide if as rolling release best meets their needs.

    One of the best such operating systems is Netrunner Rolling. I love this Arch/Manjaro-based operating system for several reasons, but mostly for its elegant implementation of the KDE Plasma desktop environment. It is themed beautifully, providing a smooth user interface that is familiar to those switching from Windows. Not to mention, it comes pre-loaded with many excellent packages, making it a great "out of the box" Linux experience for newbies. Just in time for Easter, Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 becomes available for download -- the first ISO refresh since August of last year.

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Released With Updated KDE Desktop Bits

  • Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Released With Updated KDE Desktop Bits

    The Netrunner Rolling Linux distribution that is based on Arch Linux / Manjaro (unlike the non-rolling release using Debian Testing) is out with a new release for this KDE-focused desktop platform.

    Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 is out this weekend and its desktop is powered by KDE Plasma 5.15.3, KDE Frameworks 5.56, KDE Applications 18.12.3, and Qt 5.12.2. While Netrunner is generally known as one of the great KDE Linux distributions, sadly the KDE Applications 19.04 didn't make it into this update.

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Run Through

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Delivers A Manjaro Linux-based

  • Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 Delivers A Manjaro Linux-based Polished Desktop

    There are a few distros that boast of a great out-of-the-box KDE desktop experience. Just like KDE Neon, the Netrunner Rolling edition is also known for its visually pleasing and fluid KDE Plasma experience.

    Netrunner developers list the exclusive packages and under the hood patching as reasons to choose Netrunner Rolling over Manjaro Linux. Additionally, Netrunner packages get updated less frequently and they undergo more rigorous testing.

    Overall, it’s your choice and I’d advise you to try different distros to see what suits your needs. Also, keep reading Fossbytes and sharing your views with us.

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