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Linux on Dex comes to Galaxy S9, Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy Tab S5e

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Linux

Linux on DeX is aimed to bring the seamless mobility of Samsung’s DeX platform for developers to code on the go. The app enables developers to work on both Android and Ubuntu-based Linux distributions anytime, anywhere. Other Linux distributions may also work, although Samsung isn’t offering official support for those yet. Also, Samsung is partnering with Canonical, the maker of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, to provide Linux on DeX users with a modified version of Ubuntu.

As of now, Linux on DeX is only compatible with the Galaxy Note 9 and the Galaxy Tab S4. However, with the new update, users of Samsung’s Galaxy S flagships from 2018 as well as 2019 get it too. The recently launched Galaxy Tab S5e also now supports Linux on DeX. The new version, which is currently in beta, also fixes the issue with Ubuntu image download on Google Chrome.

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Linux on DeX app updated with support for more Galaxy devices

  • Linux on DeX app updated with support for more Galaxy devices

    Although DeX is available on all of Samsung’s flagship devices since the Galaxy S8/S8+, the Linux on DeX app has been limited to the Galaxy Note 9 and Tab S4 so far. The Korean company is changing all that with a new update to the Linux on DeX app that adds support for the Galaxy S9/S9+, Galaxy S10e/S10/S10+/S10 5G, and the Galaxy Tab S5e. The Galaxy Tab S5e’s addition may seem odd considering it’s not a proper flagship device, but it does pack high-end specs capable of powering Linux on DeX and is also the latest tablet with an AMOLED screen in Samsung’s tablet lineup.

    [...]

    Even as Android OEMs, including Samsung, continue to pack PC-level specs into their smartphones, they haven’t really found any compelling use-cases for the resources. Initiatives like Linux on DeX have the potential to fill this gap and transform the modern-day smartphone into a single, all-purpose computing device.

Now you can use more Samsung phones, tablets as Linux desktop PC

  • Now you can use more Samsung phones, tablets as Linux desktop PCs

    Samsung’s Linux on DeX software lets you use a Samsung smartphone or tablet as a Linux desktop computer by connecting an external display, mouse, and keyboard and running the app.

    When the software launched last year it was only compatible with two devices — the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 and Galaxy Tab S4.

    Now Samsung has rolled out an update that brings support for a bunch of additional Samsung devices released over the past few years.

Linux on DeX now supports the Galaxy S9...

  • Linux on DeX now supports the Galaxy S9, Galaxy Tab S5e, and Galaxy Note 8, and hints at upcoming Galaxy Tab S5 support

    Samsung DeX turns flagship Samsung Galaxy smartphones and tablets into portable PCs. In its first iteration, released alongside the Galaxy S8, DeX required dedicated hardware in the form of the DeX Station. With the Galaxy Note 9 and Galaxy Tab S4, DeX no longer required a special dock and instead worked with supported USB Type-C to HDMI dongles. (Dockless DeX later made its way over to the Galaxy S9, Galaxy Note 8, and Galaxy S8 with the One UI/Android Pie update.) Samsung has done a good job improving DeX on supported devices, but one of Samsung DeX’s best features—Linux on DeX—was only officially supported on the Galaxy Note 9 and Galaxy Tab S4. Now, the latest Linux on DeX beta update officially adds support for the Galaxy S9/S9+, Galaxy S10/S10+/S10e/S10 5G, and Galaxy Tab S5e.

Android Police's Coverage

  • Linux on DeX is now compatible with Galaxy S9, S10, and Tab S5e

    Linux on DeX, announced at a developer conference last year, is a program that lets you run Linux (Ubuntu, in this case) on your Samsung smartphone or tablet, turning it into a full-fledged computer. Initially, it only worked on the Galaxy Note 9 and Tab S4, but with today's update, both Galaxy S9 and S10 families are now supported (along with, for some reason, the mid-range Tab S5e).

Linux Now Available on More Phones with Samsung’s Latest DeX

  • Linux Now Available on More Phones with Samsung’s Latest DeX Update

    With this feature, Samsung basically enables Linux to run on its DeX platform, which allows a smartphone to double as a PC when connected to a bigger screen with a dedicated adapter.

    While the standard DeX version is available for all latest-generation Samsung phones, the Linux on DeX project advances slowly, so only a handful of models are supported for now.

More DeX

  • Galaxy S9, S10, and Galaxy Tab S5e now have Linux on DeX

    Samsung’s latest flagships are so powerful you could almost use them as a portable PC. Actually, you already can if you don’t mind running Android in Samsung’s special DeX mode. But if you really wanted desktop applications, you’re mostly out of luck. Not unless you’re comfortable using Linux via Samsung’s still beta Linux on DeX. Fortunately, the company is now expanding support of that platform to its latest flagship smartphones and, surprisingly, its mid-range tablet as well.

  • Samsung brings Linux on DeX to more devices: Is your phone on the list?

    Samsung’s Linux on DeX is one of the coolest manufacturer initiatives around, bringing full-fledged Linux to the company’s desktop environment. The Samsung Galaxy Note 9 and Galaxy Tab S4 were the first devices to support the initiative, but the Korean manufacturer is expanding support this week.

    According to an official email sent to users, Linux on DeX is now available on the Galaxy S9 series, the Galaxy S10 range (including the Galaxy S10e and 5G model), and the Galaxy Tab S5e.

    This makes for a pretty big expansion, although the Galaxy S8 series, Galaxy Note 8, and the company’s new crop of A-series devices are left in the lurch. Still, you have to give kudos to Samsung for bringing Linux to DeX in the first place, especially when Huawei doesn’t have Linux via its desktop mode.

9to5Google: Samsung’s Linux on DeX beta now rolling out

  • Samsung’s Linux on DeX beta now rolling out to Galaxy S9, S10, Tab S5e

    While we trialled the beta software at the tail end of last year on the Galaxy Note 9, it was only available to those who had access to the Note 9 or Galaxy Tab S4. That did leave a sour taste in the mouth for many wanting to try out Linux on their own Samsung handsets.

    Samsung has today confirmed that the Linux on DeX beta has now extended to a further set of devices, and now fully supports Android Pie and their own One UI OS skin.

Samsung DeX helps their top phones (and tablets) stand out

  • Samsung DeX helps their top phones (and tablets) stand out with a full desktop (or Linux) experience

    When comparing Android powered tablets, they seem much more alike than different. There’s not too many different ways you can really present a black slate with a glass-covered display, right? Well, that’s true, but Samsung found differentiation in the form of DeX – Samsung’s Desktop Experience.

    At the outset, DeX wasn’t a cheap thing to get into – on top of spending $1000 on a compatible smartphone or tablet, you had to spend extra to get a DeX dock. Perhaps because of this, DeX didn’t really take off when it was first announced a couple of years ago, but that’s changed a bit since.

    The latest flagships don’t need that expensive dock; in fact I’m using the same USB C to HDMI Cable for my Tab S4 as I do to extend my Macbook display. So, it’s not a big outlay and it’s got multiple purposes when you do buy the cable, so this makes it far less of a cost outlay.

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