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Sad News! Scientific Linux is Being Discontinued

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Scientific Linux, a distributions focused on scientists in high energy physics field, will not be developed anymore. It’s creator, Fermilab, is replacing it by CentOS in its labs.
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Scientific Linux is dead, and that's a good thing

  • Scientific Linux is dead, and that's a good thing

    There are too many Linux distributions these days. While it can be argued that having too much choice is never a bad thing, the truth is, having so many distros causes resources to be spread too thinly. There is a lot of redundancy and waste, and eventually, the chickens will come home to roost -- we will see Linux-based operating systems begin to drop like flies.

    Linux Mint is alive for now, but infighting and feelings of defeat have many users worried about its future. Sadly, another Linux distribution, Scientific Linux, really has died. This operating system was based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), and maintained by some significant members of the scientific community, such as The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and CERN. While current versions (6 and 7) will continue to be supported, future development has permanently ended, with the organizations instead turning to CentOS -- another distro based on RHEL.

Scientific Linux Will Be Discontinued After 14 Years

  • Scientific Linux Will Be Discontinued After 14 Years as Fermilab Moves to CentOS

    Produced by Fermilab, CERN, ETH Zurich, and DESY, Scientific Linux is an open-source and free Linux-based operating system derived from the freely distributed sourced of Red Hat's RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux). It was first released 14 years ago on May 10th, 2004.

    Now, almost 14 years later, those who worked hard to maintain one of the very few GNU/Linux distributions dedicated to science have decided that it's time to rest and no longer publish new releases of Scientific Linux. Scientific Linux 8 was supposed to be the next major version, but it won't see the light of day.

"Fermi Accelerator Laboratory and CERN Will Move To CentOS"

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