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Mozilla: More on IRC (or Less of IRC), Firefox Nightly and Mozilla's 'IoT'

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Fluxbox
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Mozilla IRC Sunset and the Rust Channel

    The Rust community has had a presence on Mozilla’s IRC network almost since Rust’s inception. Over time, the single channel grew into a set of pretty active channels where folks would come to ask Rust questions, coordinate work on Rust itself, and just in general chat about Rust.

    Mozilla recently announced that it would be shutting down its IRC network, citing a growing maintenance and moderation burden. They are looking into new options for the Mozilla community, but this does leave the question open as to what the Rust project will do.

    Last year a lot of the teams started exploring new communication platforms. Almost all the Rust teams no longer use IRC as their official discussion platform, instead using Discord or Zulip (as well as a variety of video chat tools for synchronous meetings). The few teams that do use IRC are working with us to find a new home, likely a channel on Discord or Zulip.

    This leaves the #rust and #rust-beginners channels on Mozilla’s IRC network, which are still quite active, that will need a new home when Mozilla’s network shuts down. Rust’s official Discord server does have the #users, #help, and #beginners channels that fill in this purpose, and we recommend people start using those.

  • irc.mozilla.org

    I remember the very first time I used IRC. It was 2004, and earlier in the week I had met with Mike Shaver at Seneca, probably for the first time, and he'd ended our meeting with a phrase I'd never heard before, but I nodded knowingly nevertheless: "Ping me in #developers."

    Ping me. What on earth did that mean!? Little did I know that this phrase would come to signify so much about the next decade of my life. After some research and initial trial and error, 'dave' joined irc.mozilla.org and found his way to the unlisted #developers channel. And there was 'shaver', along with 300 or so other #developers.

    The immediacy of it was unlike anything I'd used before (or since). To join irc was to be transported somewhere else. You weren't anywhere, or rather, you were simultaneously everywhere. For many of these years I was connecting to irc from an old farm house in the middle of rural Ontario over a satellite internet connection. But when I got online, there in the channels with me were people from New Zealand, the US, Sweden, and everywhere in between.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 58

    Continuing on fixing regressions in QuantumBar, including improvements for RTL, less visual flicker and lots more.

  • Mozilla's IoT relaunches, sun-based GPS, and more news

    As you might expect, Mozilla has irons in a number of open source fires. Over the last two weeks, Mozilla has gone public with two significant projects.

    The first one is Pyodide. It's an "experimental Python project that’s designed to perform computation" from within a browser window. While other projects are also attempting to bring Python interpreters to the web browser, Pyodide "doesn’t require a rewrite of popular scientific computing tools (like NumPy, Pandas, Scipy, and Matplotlib) to achieve adequate performance."

    The second project is an IoT platform called Mozilla WebThings. WebThings isn't new. It's the grown up version of the organization's Project Things platform "for monitoring and controlling connected devices." The latest version of WebThings add features for logging and visualizing data from your smart devices, as well as monitoring and triggering alarms from internet-connected detectors. You can learn more at the Mozilla IoT site.

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Audiocasts/Shows: POSIX, TWIL and Going Linux

  • POSIX Compliance Explained: Does It Even Matter In 2020

    Like with the Unix Philosphy, POSIX compliance tends to get simplified far more than it really needs to which sort of makes it seem less important than it really is, so today I thought it would be a good idea to take the time to explain what it is and where it came from and why it was important in the early days of Unix and even now in the days of Linux and various BSD variants.

  • This Week in Linux 118: Lenovo’s New Ubuntu Laptops, GNOME 40, Puppy Linux 9.5, Firefox 81, UBports

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a great show for you even though I’m sick. As they say in show business, the show must go on or something like that. Lenovo Adds Ubuntu Laptops & PCs to their lineup. UBports released their latest update with 16.04 OTA-13. Puppy Linux has a brand new version out with Puppy Linux 9.5. Microsoft announce that after a long wait everyone can rejoice that they are finally bringing Microsoft Edge to Linux! Mozilla also announced a new version of Firefox with Firefox 81. EndeavourOS has a new release of this Arch Linux based distro with version 2020.09.20 and they also announced a new ARM Edition of the distro. GNOME has decided to change the version numbering for the project. We’ll talk about this and why it matters or why it doesn’t. There’s a new update to the very powerful ebook reader Calibre, with Calibre 5.0. We’ll check out the Screenshot Utility, Flameshot and their latest release of 0.8. Then we’ll round out the show with some potentially great news for the Lightworks Video Editor. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Going Linux #397 · Listener Feedback

    We answer questions about problems receiving the podcast, SSH, printers, browsers and more. We also discuss photography and the new major computer brands selling computers pre-installed with Linux.

dupeGuru – find duplicate files

Even though the cost of storage per GB continues to fall, it’s common for users to need to find and remove duplicates files. The process of finding and removing duplicates is time-consuming. Fortunately, there are a number of tools that are designed to remove the laborious nature of finding duplicates. dupeGuru is a cross-platform GUI tool to find duplicate files in a system. It has three modes, Standard, Music and Picture, with each mode having its own scan types and unique features. dupeGuru is written in Python. Read more