Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Apache OpenOffice and LibreOffice in the News

Filed under
LibO
OOo
  • Apache OpenOffice: The Free Open-Source Office Software Suite

    Apache OpenOffice is available in diverse languages and works well on all common computer systems. It is primarily developed for Windows, Linux, and macOS with ports to other operating systems. The default file format for this software is the OpenDocument Format (ODF), an ISO/IEC standard. However, it can also read and write an extensive variety of other file formats, with specific attention to those from Microsoft Office (i.e. DOCX, XLS, PPT, and XML). The software can be downloaded and used for any purpose and yes, it’s Free of Charge.

  • Get a Microsoft Office-style suite for free

    Before we get into the details of how to download LibreOffice, we want to tell you about Capterra, which is a great website for comparing software solutions for home and business use. Even before they became a sponsor of Komando.com, we used them ALL. THE. TIME.

    Check out how you can do side-by-side comparisons of spreadsheet programs in the screen shot below. Capterra has hundreds of software comparisons that include professional and user reviews.

Slackware LibreOffice 6.2.3 packages available

  • Libre Office 6.2.3 packages available

    I built and uploaded new packages for LibreOffice 6.2.3. A rebuild for Slackware-current was needed anyway because of the recent boost upgrade in -current, but I assume everyone knows that my boost-compat package will help you with the need for older library versions.

    The 6.2.3 release was just over a week ago, but I have not feeling well for a while and things move a lot slower these days. Updates will no longer have the same frequency I am afraid.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Price of Raspberry Pi 4B with 2GB RAM Drops to $35 Permanently

Raspberry Pi 1 Model B was introduced to the world almost exactly 8 years ago on February 29, 2012, and to celebrate the Raspberry Pi Foundation decided to permanently lower the price of Raspberry Pi 4B with 2GB RAM to $35. This was made possible due to falling RAM prices. The 1GB RAM version will still be sold for $35 to industrial and commercial customers due to long term support commitments. Sadly, the 4GB RAM version remains at $55, so no discount for this version for now. Read more

Android Leftovers

What Is the Difference Between Ubuntu Desktop and Ubuntu Server?

Apart from the many Ubuntu Flavours, Ubuntu has different versions namely Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Server, and Ubuntu desktop. The Ubuntu Server is the operating system version of Ubuntu built specifically to the server specifications while Ubuntu Desktop is the version built to run on desktops and laptops. In case you missed it, here are 10 Reasons Why Your Business Is Better Off With A Linux Server. And if you’re just joining us then read on to know which type of the Ubuntu ISO image you’re better off using. A server is a computer designed to provide data and other functionality to other computers over the internet. They may run common servers like the Apache TTP server and the computers typically run on a LAN or WAN e.g. desktops, laptops, smartphones, IoT devices. A desktop computer is any personal computer designed to be used regularly at a single location due to its size. Read more

7 open source Q&A platforms

Where do you go when you have a question? Since humans began walking the earth, we've asked the people around us—our family, friends, neighbors, classmates, co-workers, or other people we know well. Much later came libraries and bookstores offering knowledge and resources, as well as access for anyone to come in and search for the answers. When the home computer became common, these knowledge bases extended to electronic encyclopedias shipped on floppy disks or CD-ROMs. Then, when the internet age arrived, these knowledge bases migrated online to the likes of Wikipedia, and search engines like Google were born with the purpose of making it easy for people to search for answers to their questions. Now, sites like StackOverflow are there to answer our software questions and Quora for our general queries. The lesson is clear, though. We all have questions, and we all want answers for them. And some of us want to help others find answers to their questions, and this is where self-hosted Q&A sites come in. Read more