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ChromeOS and 'Proper' GNU/Linux

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Google
  • Every Chromebook sold this year will support Linux apps

    If the ability to run desktop Linux apps on Chromebooks is something that interests you, but you’re yet to bite on buying a device to do it, it sounds like your patience has paid off!

    Google has apparently said that every Chromebook launched in 2019 will support Linux apps out of the box, according to an Android Police update on Google I/O 2019 happenings.

    Linux Apps on Chrome OS (codenamed “Crostini”) made their formal debut last year when they entered beta with the release of ChromeOS 69.

    The feature is still in beta as of the most recent Chrome OS release, v75, but is already proving popular with users, with particular appeal amongst developers.

  • Linux-Ready Chromebooks To Launch This Year With Android Studio

    Google has confirmed that all laptops running Chrome OS this year will be Linux-Ready Chromebooks. The news comes after the main keynote at Google I/O which introduced a number of features to Google Search, Google Assistant and a lot more.

    Google also confirmed that Linux-Ready Chromebooks will have an easy time installing Android Studio. Earlier this wasn’t the case as developers struggled with developing Android apps on Chromebooks.

  • All Chromebooks launched this year will be Linux-ready

    Last year, Google brought Linux support to Chromebooks. It's a really nifty feature, and it's only been improving since I/O 2018. But this year, Google announced that all Chromebooks launched in 2019 will be Linux-ready right out of the box, which is great for developers, enthusiasts, and newbies alike.

    These announcements have been quick and brief, but at least this news is straight to the point, though every Chromebook I've tested recently had Linux support. As someone who regularly distro hops on my personal machines, the Linux installation process on Chrome OS is top-notch for ease of use, I must say.

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KDE Frameworks 5.61, Applications 19.08 in FreeBSD

Recent releases were KDE Frameworks 5.61 and KDE Applications 19.08. These have both landed in the official FreeBSD ports tree, after Tobias did most of the work and I pushed the big red button. Your FreeBSD machine will need to be following current ports – not the quarterly release branches, since we don’t backport to those. All the modern bits have arrived, maintaining the KDE-FreeBSD team’s commitment to up-to-date software for the FreeBSD desktop. The one thing we’re currently lagging on is Qt 5.13. There’s a FreeBSD problem report tracking that update. Read more

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As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

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