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KDE Wallpaper competition update

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KDE

Howdy folks! Here’s a reminder about our Plasma 5.16 wallpaper competition. We’ve gotten lots of wallpapers, but there’s a little more than two weeks left and still plenty of time to submit you gorgeous entries! As a reminder, the winner also receives a Slimbook One computer! Here are the rules.

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Audiocasts/Shows: LINUX Unplugged, Linux Headlines, This Week in Linux, mintCast and Nathan Wolf's Noodlings

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Plasma 5.17 for Kubuntu 19.10 available in Backports PPA

We are pleased to announce that Plasma 5.17.1, is now available in our backports PPA for Kubuntu 19.10. The release announcement detailing the new features and improvements in Plasma 5.17 can be found here Read more

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Week 1

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers. The purpose of the blog is two-fold. Primarily, it’s to share my experiences using the RPI4 purely as a desktop replacement machine, to see what works well, and what doesn’t. It’s also to act as an aide-mémoire for myself. Along the way, I’ll be exploring what I’m looking for from a desktop machine. Smooth running multimedia, office based software, email, networking, and productivity apps are all high on my list of priorities. Rest assured, even though I am a huge advocate of the Pi range of computers, I’ll be brutally honest in my critique of RPI4. For example, the RPI4 is marketed as an energy efficient computer. In a way that’s very true. The Pi consumes a mere 2.8 watts when idle and about 5w when maxing out all 4 cores. But the firmware doesn’t automatically switch off the monitors’ backlight. Instead, it only blanks the screen. While there are plans to fix this issue (part fix with a working vcgencmd), it’s a startling omission. With inadequate power management of the monitors, it’s hard to consider the Pi 4 as an energy efficient desktop solution. Read more