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OSS: Red Hat Interview, Molly de Blanc on OSI, European Commission Quiz and More

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OSS
  • A Fireside Chat with Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst

    “I’m trying to run this little software company and continue to organically grow at double digit rates. I spend a lot more time than average out with customers. A lot of them are IBM customers, are Red Hat customers and they want to know how this is all going to work. I probably talk to 10 customers a week.”

    “We’re not a professional services company, but because we’ve been open to open source for 25 years, people naturally come to us and ask for our help and thoughts about the cultural transformation needed to leverage the technologies [they need] to deliver at the pace that their business customers expect.”

  • Molly de Blanc: OSI Update: May 2019

    At the most recent Open Source Initiative face-to-face board meeting I was elected president of the board of directors. In the spirit of transparency, I wanted to share a bit about my goals and my vision for the organization over the next five years. These thoughts are my own, not reflecting official organization policy or plans. They do not speak to the intentions nor desires of other members of the board. I am representing my own thoughts, and where I’d like to see the future of the OSI go.

    [...]

    I’ve been called an ideologue, an idealist, a true believer, a wonk, and a number of other things — flattering, embarrassing, and offensive — concerning my relationship to free and open source software. I recently said that “user freedom is the hill I will die on, and let the carrion birds feast on my remains.” While we are increasingly discussing the ethical considerations of technology we need to also raise awareness of the ways user freedom and software freedom are entwined with the ethical considerations of computing. These philosophies need to be in the foundational design of all modern technologies in order for us to build technology that is ethical.

    I have a vision for the way the OSI should fit into the future of technology, I think it’s a good vision, and I thought that being president would be a good way to help move that forward. It also gave me a very concrete and candid opportunity to share my hopes for the present and the future with my fellow board directors, to see where they agree and where they dissent, and to collaboratively build a cohesive organizational mission.

  • Quiz launched to assess public knowledge of FOSS

     

    The European Commission is an enthusiastic user, producer and contributor of free and open source software (FOSS). Freely licensed to use, copy, study and change in any way, open source code is publicly shared to encourage people (anyone) to voluntarily improve the design and features of the software.
     

    Many people already use FOSS without knowing they are benefiting from it. This is about to change. To spread the message about the benefits of FOSS, the EU-FOSSA 2 project has created a simple quiz in an effort to assess the level of understanding of FOSS among the public. In addition, the quiz covers issues such as the safety of FOSS, how often it is used, and whether European institutions use FOSS. To take part in the quiz, click here.

  • Stremio Open Source Add-on Competition offers $5,000 in Rewards [Ed: More openwashing stunts. Surveillance capitalism trying to come across as "open"]

    Last year, the team behind Stremio — a one-stop hub for video content aggregation — featured a competition that encouraged the community to develop add-ons for their open-source video streaming application. Many people participated, but only four were awarded prizes. This year, the team is trying to replicate that same success by hosting another add-on competition.

  • Kernel source code available for Nokia 2

    Nokia Mobile updated their “Open Source” page today, where the company provides source code obligated by the GPL, LGPL and other open source licenses. The list contains most Nokia smartphones, with the Nokia 2 being the latest addition.

  • 13 Years After Launch, The Open-Source Radeon Linux Driver Sees Occasional ATI R5xx Fix

    It's not too often these days that new kernel updates bring changes to the pre-GCN Radeon Linux driver, but overnight a fix has been queued for helping out at least some users still running with ATI R5xx series hardware.

    R500 is what was the Radeon X1000 series more than a decade ago. On the Microsoft side, Windows 7 was the end of the road for the Radeon X1000 series hardware while under Linux the open-source driver code continues to see rare commits. This latest bit of work for R500 is a PLL fix to fix flickering in some cases.

  • Fresh snaps for April 2019

More in Tux Machines

Software: Olivia, MariaDB, LibreOffice/Document Foundation, GNU Parallel

  • Olivia: Cloud-Based Music Player With YouTube Support And Over 25,000 Online Radio Stations
    Olivia is a fairly new free, open source Qt5 cloud-based music player for Linux. It can play music from YouTube, comes with more than 25,000 Internet radio stations, it supports themes, has a mini player mode, it can save songs for offline playback, and much more. The cloud-based music player is available as alpha software for testing right now. Even so, it works quite well, though lacking some features which I'll mention later on. Olivia is well integrated with YouTube, allowing users to search for songs and add them to the play queue, browse trending YouTube music with the ability to change the country, and more. To save bandwidth, Olivia only plays the audio of YouTube streams.
  • MariaDB 10.3.15 Release And What’s New
    The MariaDB Foundation is pleased to announce the availability of MariaDB 10.3.15, the latest stable release in the MariaDB 10.3 series.
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  • Annual Report 2018: New releases of LibreOffice
    Thanks to your generous donations, and contributions from our ecosystem of certified developers, we released two major releases of LibreOffice in 2018: 6.0 on January 31, and version 6.1 on August 8. In addition, 14 minor releases were also made available throughout the year, for the 5.4, 6.0 and 6.1 branches. Meanwhile, several Bug Hunting Sessions were held in preparation for the new major releases. These typically took place on a single day between set times, so that experienced developers and QA engineers could help new volunteers to file and triage bugs via the IRC channels and mailing lists. The Bug Hunting Sessions for LibreOffice 5.4 were held on April 27, May 28 and July 3 – while those for LibreOffice 6.2 took place on October 22, November 19 and December 21.
  • The Document Foundation welcomes Adfinis SyGroup to the project’s Advisory Board
    The Document Foundation (TDF) announced today that Adfinis SyGroup – a Swiss FOSS company headquarted in Bern, with offices in Basel, Zurich and Crissier (Vaud) – has joined the project’s Advisory Board. Adfinis SyGroup is using LibreOffice for office productivity, in addition to providing professional consultancy to customers with SLA contracts to support migrations from proprietary software to LibreOffice. The company has helped to organize the LibreOffice Conference in 2014, when the event was hosted by the Bern University, is contributing patches to the source code, and is also hosting various TDF servers and buildbots on their infrastructure.
  • parallel @ Savannah: GNU Parallel 20190522 ('Akihito') released
    GNU Parallel 20190522 ('Akihito') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ GNU Parallel is 10 years old in a year on 2020-04-22. You are here by invited to a reception on Friday 2020-04-17. See https://www.gnu.org/software/parallel/10-years-anniversary.html

today's howtos

Programming: Kyma, Microsoft Entryism, Python, Go, and Fedora Summer Coding interns

  • Kyma - extend and build on Kubernetes with ease
    According to this recently completed CNCF Survey, the adoption rate of Cloud Native technologies in production is growing rapidly. Kubernetes is at the heart of this technological revolution. Naturally, the growth of cloud native technologies has been accompanied by the growth of the ecosystem that surrounds it. Of course, the complexity of cloud native technologies have increased as well. Just google for the phrase “Kubernetes is hard”, and you’ll get plenty of articles that explain this complexity problem. The best thing about the CNCF community is that problems like this can be solved by smart people building new tools to enable Kubernetes users: Projects like Knative and its Build resource extension, for example, serve to reduce complexity across a range of scenarios. Even though increasing complexity might seem like the most important issue to tackle, it is not the only challenge you face when transitioning to Cloud Native.
  • A panel with the new Python steering council [Ed: Microsoft bought PyCon and and now it's stuffing/stacking Python panels to push proprietary software with back doors (or its 'free bait')]
    Brett Cannon is a development manager for the Python extension to Visual Studio Code at Microsoft. [...] [I would like to thank LWN's travel sponsor, the Linux Foundation, for travel assistance to Cleveland for PyCon.]
  • Run your blog on GitHub Pages with Python [Ed: Why does Red Hat's site help Microsoft devour blogs with its  surveillance and lock-in machine?]
  • Testing a Go-based S2I builder image
  • EuroPython 2019: Monday and Tuesday activities for main conference attendees
    Although the main conference starts on Wednesday, July 10th, there’s already so much to do for attendees with the main conference ticket on Monday 8th and Tuesday 9th.
  • Test and Code: 75: Modern Testing Principles - Alan Page
  • Shaily and Zubin: Building CI pipelines and helping testers
    This post is the third introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Shaily Sangwan and Zubin Choudhary, who are both working on projects to improve quality assurance processes in the Fedora community.

Security: Curl, OpenSUSE, Equifax and Kubernetes

  • Report from the curl bounty program
    We announced our glorious return to the “bug bounty club” (projects that run bug bounties) a month ago, and with the curl 7.65.0 release today on May 22nd of 2019 we also ship fixes to security vulnerabilities that were reported within this bug bounty program.
  • OpenSUSE Adds Option To Installer For Toggling Performance-Hitting CPU Mitigations
    With the newly released openSUSE Leap 15.1 they have added an option to their installer for toggling the CPU mitigations around Spectre / Meltdown / Foreshadow / Zombieload to make it very convenient should you choose to retain maximum performance while foregoing the security measures. But it also allows disabling SMT/HT from the installer should you prefer maximum security. When installing openSUSE Leap 15.1 today, I was a bit surprised to see a "CPU mitigations" option that allows toggling the value similar to the mitigations= kernel command line option.
  • Equifax just became the first company to have its outlook downgraded for a cyber attack
  • Equifax just became the first company to have its outlook downgraded for a cyber attack
    Moody’s has just slashed its rating outlook on Equifax, the first time cybersecurity issues have been cited as the reason for a downgrade. Moody’s lowered Equifax’s outlook from stable to negative on Wednesday, as the credit monitoring company continues to suffer from the massive 2017 breach of consumer data. “We are treating this with more significance because it is the first time that cyber has been a named factor in an outlook change,” Joe Mielenhausen, a spokesperson for Moody’s, told CNBC. “This is the first time the fallout from a breach has moved the needle enough to contribute to the change.” Equifax could not immediately be reached for comment.
  • Kubernetes security: 4 strategic tips
    As with all things security-related, “fingers crossed!” isn’t exactly a confident posture. Kubernetes offers a lot of powerful security-oriented features, and the community has shown a strong commitment toward the security of the project. But it’s always best to be proactive, especially if you or your teams are still relatively new to containers and orchestration. The fundamentals of security hygiene still largely apply, as we noted in our recent article, Kubernetes security: 5 mistakes to avoid. There’s also some new learning to be done to ensure you’re proactively managing the risks inherent in any new system, especially once it’s running in production.