Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Seattle Is 'Most Unwired City' In America

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This year's survey sheds more light on what previous Intel Unwired Cities surveys were indicating - that connecting to wireless Internet access points with laptop PCs and other wireless-enabled devices in public places is becoming part of everyday life in America . Businesses use wireless Internet access as a competitive advantage to attract customers, and cities use it to enhance livability and quality of life. Consumers are also discovering these so-called "WiFi hotspots" at an increasingly diverse range of locations - from airports and hotels to laundromats and baseball parks.

"Wireless is becoming a fundamental part of how we live," said Bert Sperling of Sperling's Best Places, which conducted the surveys. "The ability to access information and entertainment when and where you want it is simply irresistible to business people seeking greater productivity and consumers who live an on-the-go lifestyle."

Following the Seattle-Bellevue-Everett-Tacoma, Wash. area on the list of top 10 unwired regions are San Francisco-San Jose-Oakland, Calif. (No. 2); Austin, Texas (No. 3); Portland, Ore.-Vancouver, Wash. (No. 4); Toledo, Ohio (No. 5); Atlanta (No. 6); Denver (N o. 7); Raleigh-Durham, N.C. (No. 8); Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. (No. 9) and Orange County, Calif. (No.10). Making the biggest jump over last year, Baton Rouge , La. climbed 67 spots to crack the top 20. The complete list of Intel's "Most Unwired Cities" is available at http://www.intel.com/go/unwiredcities

In addition to identifying the top unwired regions, the survey found increasing diversity in the types of places where WiFi is being offered, including:

-- Legacy Golf Resort - Phoenix
-- Kansas Speedway - Kansas City , Kan.
-- Chelsea Piers - New York
-- Loveland Ski Area - Georgetown , Colo.
-- SBC Park - San Francisco
-- Dirtwood Skatepark - Houston
-- King County Library - Seattle
-- Waveland Bowl - Chicago

About the Survey

Survey findings for the 2005 "Most Unwired Cities" are based on the number of commercial and public or "free" wireless access points (hotspots), airports with wireless access, and broadband availability. The survey also included community wireless access points, local wireless networks and wireless e-mail devices. The metro areas included in the survey were the 100 largest in the United States and based on the definitions of Metropolitan Statistical Areas from the U.S. Census Bureau. The data was also calculated at the per-capita level to determine how many people share hotspots within a given city or region. Data was collected from a variety of industry sources between Jan. 1 and April 15, 2005 and weighted across a 100-point scale to allow comparison between categories.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

RancherOS: A tiny Linux for Docker lovers

Like the various Linux server and desktop distributions, the container-oriented Linux distributions mix and match various projects and components to construct a complete container infrastructure. These distros generally combine a minimal OS kernel, an orchestration framework, and an ecosystem of container services. RancherOS not only fits the mold, but takes the minimal kernel and the container paradigm to extremes. Read more

Review: System76’s Galago Pro solves “just works” Linux’s Goldilocks problem

The Linux world has long maintained a very specific rite of passage: wiping the default operating system from your laptop and plugging in a USB stick with your favorite distro's live CD. Some of us get a little, dare I say, giddy every time we wipe that other OS away and see that first flash of GRUB. Of course, rites of passage are supposed to be one-time events. Once you've wiped Windows or OS X a time or two, that giddiness vanishes—replaced by a feeling of annoyance, a kind of tax on being a Linux user. Read more

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 3

After introducing yesterday a real GNOME vanilla session, let’s see how we are using this to implement small behavior differences and transforming current Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post. Read more

GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday
    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.
  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today
    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer! Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!
  • Happy birthday, GNOME!
    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!
  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday
    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.