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Phoronix on Kernel, Graphics and Phoronix Test Suite 8.8

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Linux 5.2 Ups Laptop Support From A New Intel Power Button Driver To Better Ryzen Input

    Both Intel and AMD laptop hardware are seeing various improvements coming with the in-development Linux 5.2 kernel.

    First up, Linux 5.2 will finally offer better compatibility with many AMD Ryzen laptops out there... In particular, as previously covered, the new AMD PCIe MP2 I2C controller driver has been merged and allows many laptop touchpads / touchscreens to finally function accordingly under Linux. It has taken a long time for this AMD driver to get into shape for mainline but it's here with Linux 5.2 to finally provide out-of-the-box/working touchpad/touchscreen support without requiring an out-of-tree DKMS module or hitting other snags.

  • Working OpenCL Through Gallium3D Clover With LLVM To SPIR-V Conversion

    Karol Herbst of Red Hat who has been working for more than the past year on providing OpenCL support in Gallium3D's "Clover" state tracker via SPIR-V so it can easily work with drivers like Nouveau seems to be approaching the finish line. 

  • Vulkan 1.1.108 Released With Two New Extensions

    It's been almost a month since the last Vulkan spec update with Vulkan 1.1.107, which is a long time considering they go through some periods of almost weekly updates, but out today is v1.1.108 and it introduces two new extensions. 

    Vulkan 1.1.108 does bring with it a number of clarifications and corrections to the documentation itself. The Vulkan 1.1.108 changes appear mostly routine and nothing too notable when it comes to the fixes. 

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.8 Further Enhances Open-Source, Automated Windows Benchmarking

    While we have endless passion and fun for Linux (and BSD) benchmarking, with Phoronix Test Suite 8.8 being released there are yet more improvements for our open-source, automated and repeatable benchmarking on Microsoft Windows.

More in Tux Machines

Software: Olivia, MariaDB, LibreOffice/Document Foundation, GNU Parallel

  • Olivia: Cloud-Based Music Player With YouTube Support And Over 25,000 Online Radio Stations
    Olivia is a fairly new free, open source Qt5 cloud-based music player for Linux. It can play music from YouTube, comes with more than 25,000 Internet radio stations, it supports themes, has a mini player mode, it can save songs for offline playback, and much more. The cloud-based music player is available as alpha software for testing right now. Even so, it works quite well, though lacking some features which I'll mention later on. Olivia is well integrated with YouTube, allowing users to search for songs and add them to the play queue, browse trending YouTube music with the ability to change the country, and more. To save bandwidth, Olivia only plays the audio of YouTube streams.
  • MariaDB 10.3.15 Release And What’s New
    The MariaDB Foundation is pleased to announce the availability of MariaDB 10.3.15, the latest stable release in the MariaDB 10.3 series.
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  • Annual Report 2018: New releases of LibreOffice
    Thanks to your generous donations, and contributions from our ecosystem of certified developers, we released two major releases of LibreOffice in 2018: 6.0 on January 31, and version 6.1 on August 8. In addition, 14 minor releases were also made available throughout the year, for the 5.4, 6.0 and 6.1 branches. Meanwhile, several Bug Hunting Sessions were held in preparation for the new major releases. These typically took place on a single day between set times, so that experienced developers and QA engineers could help new volunteers to file and triage bugs via the IRC channels and mailing lists. The Bug Hunting Sessions for LibreOffice 5.4 were held on April 27, May 28 and July 3 – while those for LibreOffice 6.2 took place on October 22, November 19 and December 21.
  • The Document Foundation welcomes Adfinis SyGroup to the project’s Advisory Board
    The Document Foundation (TDF) announced today that Adfinis SyGroup – a Swiss FOSS company headquarted in Bern, with offices in Basel, Zurich and Crissier (Vaud) – has joined the project’s Advisory Board. Adfinis SyGroup is using LibreOffice for office productivity, in addition to providing professional consultancy to customers with SLA contracts to support migrations from proprietary software to LibreOffice. The company has helped to organize the LibreOffice Conference in 2014, when the event was hosted by the Bern University, is contributing patches to the source code, and is also hosting various TDF servers and buildbots on their infrastructure.
  • parallel @ Savannah: GNU Parallel 20190522 ('Akihito') released
    GNU Parallel 20190522 ('Akihito') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ GNU Parallel is 10 years old in a year on 2020-04-22. You are here by invited to a reception on Friday 2020-04-17. See https://www.gnu.org/software/parallel/10-years-anniversary.html

today's howtos

Programming: Kyma, Microsoft Entryism, Python, Go, and Fedora Summer Coding interns

  • Kyma - extend and build on Kubernetes with ease
    According to this recently completed CNCF Survey, the adoption rate of Cloud Native technologies in production is growing rapidly. Kubernetes is at the heart of this technological revolution. Naturally, the growth of cloud native technologies has been accompanied by the growth of the ecosystem that surrounds it. Of course, the complexity of cloud native technologies have increased as well. Just google for the phrase “Kubernetes is hard”, and you’ll get plenty of articles that explain this complexity problem. The best thing about the CNCF community is that problems like this can be solved by smart people building new tools to enable Kubernetes users: Projects like Knative and its Build resource extension, for example, serve to reduce complexity across a range of scenarios. Even though increasing complexity might seem like the most important issue to tackle, it is not the only challenge you face when transitioning to Cloud Native.
  • A panel with the new Python steering council [Ed: Microsoft bought PyCon and and now it's stuffing/stacking Python panels to push proprietary software with back doors (or its 'free bait')]
    Brett Cannon is a development manager for the Python extension to Visual Studio Code at Microsoft. [...] [I would like to thank LWN's travel sponsor, the Linux Foundation, for travel assistance to Cleveland for PyCon.]
  • Run your blog on GitHub Pages with Python [Ed: Why does Red Hat's site help Microsoft devour blogs with its  surveillance and lock-in machine?]
  • Testing a Go-based S2I builder image
  • EuroPython 2019: Monday and Tuesday activities for main conference attendees
    Although the main conference starts on Wednesday, July 10th, there’s already so much to do for attendees with the main conference ticket on Monday 8th and Tuesday 9th.
  • Test and Code: 75: Modern Testing Principles - Alan Page
  • Shaily and Zubin: Building CI pipelines and helping testers
    This post is the third introduction to the Fedora Summer Coding interns Class of Summer 2019. In this interview, we’ll meet Shaily Sangwan and Zubin Choudhary, who are both working on projects to improve quality assurance processes in the Fedora community.

Security: Curl, OpenSUSE, Equifax and Kubernetes

  • Report from the curl bounty program
    We announced our glorious return to the “bug bounty club” (projects that run bug bounties) a month ago, and with the curl 7.65.0 release today on May 22nd of 2019 we also ship fixes to security vulnerabilities that were reported within this bug bounty program.
  • OpenSUSE Adds Option To Installer For Toggling Performance-Hitting CPU Mitigations
    With the newly released openSUSE Leap 15.1 they have added an option to their installer for toggling the CPU mitigations around Spectre / Meltdown / Foreshadow / Zombieload to make it very convenient should you choose to retain maximum performance while foregoing the security measures. But it also allows disabling SMT/HT from the installer should you prefer maximum security. When installing openSUSE Leap 15.1 today, I was a bit surprised to see a "CPU mitigations" option that allows toggling the value similar to the mitigations= kernel command line option.
  • Equifax just became the first company to have its outlook downgraded for a cyber attack
  • Equifax just became the first company to have its outlook downgraded for a cyber attack
    Moody’s has just slashed its rating outlook on Equifax, the first time cybersecurity issues have been cited as the reason for a downgrade. Moody’s lowered Equifax’s outlook from stable to negative on Wednesday, as the credit monitoring company continues to suffer from the massive 2017 breach of consumer data. “We are treating this with more significance because it is the first time that cyber has been a named factor in an outlook change,” Joe Mielenhausen, a spokesperson for Moody’s, told CNBC. “This is the first time the fallout from a breach has moved the needle enough to contribute to the change.” Equifax could not immediately be reached for comment.
  • Kubernetes security: 4 strategic tips
    As with all things security-related, “fingers crossed!” isn’t exactly a confident posture. Kubernetes offers a lot of powerful security-oriented features, and the community has shown a strong commitment toward the security of the project. But it’s always best to be proactive, especially if you or your teams are still relatively new to containers and orchestration. The fundamentals of security hygiene still largely apply, as we noted in our recent article, Kubernetes security: 5 mistakes to avoid. There’s also some new learning to be done to ensure you’re proactively managing the risks inherent in any new system, especially once it’s running in production.