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Kerala schools to save Rs 3,000 crore by using Linux OS

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Schools in Kerala are expected to save Rs 3,000 crore as they have chosen the Linux-OpenSource (OS) operating system for computers being made available for teaching under a state-wide project.
“Decks have been cleared for the country’s largest ICT training for teachers, with training of over 1,50,000 primary teachers being held in Kerala. From the next academic year, we’d ply more than 2,00,000 computers in schools and each of these will be powered by the latest version of the Linux-based Free Operating System (FOSS),” says K Anvar Sadath, vice-chairman and executive director of KITE (Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education).
“If we had gone for applications of proprietary nature, each computer would have incurred at least Rs 1.5 lakh in licence fees,” he points out.
In fact, KITE has rolled out the new version, named IT@School GNU/ Linux 18.04. Based on the Ubuntu OS LTS edition, the system features several free applications customised for state school curriculum.

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KITE releases latest Linux-based free Operating System

  • KITE releases latest Linux-based free Operating System

    hiruvananthapuram, May 12 (UNI) KITE (Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education) has rolled out the latest version of its Linux based free Operating System ''IT@School GNU/ Linux 18.04'' to be used in the thousands of computers in the state schools, an official statement said here on Sunday.
    According to official statement, the new version of the Operating System is based on the Ubuntu OS LTS edition.
    In addition to being the ideal OS for teachers and students in schools, this Operating System can also be used for home computers used for general purposes, government offices, DTP centers which uses office packages, Internet Kiosks, software developers, college students, other computer service providers as a complete computing platform which is free of cost.

By Abhishek Prakash

  • Good News! Indian State Saves Over $400 Million by Choosing Linux

    Southern Indian state Kerala is known for its beautiful backwaters. Kerala is also known for its education policy. The first 100% literate Indian state has made IT classes mandatory in schools since 2003 and around 2005 they started to adopt free and open source software. It was a long term plan to boot out proprietary software from the education system.

    As a result, the state claimed to save around $50 million per year in licensing costs in 2015. Further expanding their open source mission, Kerala is going to put Linux with open source educational software on over 200,000 school computers and ‘claims’ save around $428 million in the process, reported Financial Express.

By Adarsh Verma this morning

  • Linux-based OS Is Saving $430 Million In Indian State of Kerala

    Using Linux-based operating systems have tons of advantages like better security and freedom to customize the open source software. Another major advantage that attracts different organizations and schools is the cost saving that comes along the way. In the past, we have reported various European cities going the Linux way to cut down the costs and save the public’s money.

    As per a recent report published in Financial Express, schools in the Indian state of Kerala are saving about Rs 3,000 crore by moving to a Linux-based operating system. This news follows a previous report from 2017 that mentioned that Kerala is saving Rs. 300 crore each year. If the report is to be believed, it seems that the South Indian state is making great progress in making open source software available in schools.

How switching to Linux-based free OS...

  • How switching to Linux-based free OS is saving Kerala govt schools Rs 3,000 crore

    Over 2 lakh computers in schools across Kerala will soon be provided with the latest version of a Linux-based free operating system called IT@School. Released by the state-owned Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education (KITE), it will provide a variety of applications for educational and general purposes. And according to KITE, it will help the Kerala government save around Rs 3,000 crore.

    The IT@School operating system (OS) will include several free applications customised per the state school curriculum, including an open source office suite, language input tools, database applications, DTP (Desktop Publishing) graphics, image editing software, sound recording, video editing, 3D animation packages, Geographical Information System, database servers and desktop versions of mobile apps.

    The OS will be installed in more than 14,000 government and government-aided schools – all with classes 1 to 12 – comprising 45.29 lakh students and 1.72 lakh teachers.

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