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today's leftovers

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  • Linux 5.1, Red Hat's RHEL 8, Ubuntu Touch, GCC, App Store, Alpine, WSL2 | This Week in Linux 66

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of big news to cover like the release of Linux 5.1, the new version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Microsoft announcing the Linux Kernel inside of Windows 10, Linux on Chromebooks, and more. We’ll also check out the latest release from Ubuntu Touch,…

  • Open Source Advocates express concern about Microsoft monopolizing OSS tooling [Ed: Everyone needs to delete GitHub now that dedicated Microsoft propaganda sites try to dismiss claims that Microsoft uses GitHub to sabotage the FOSS world]

    The executive director of the Eclipse Foundation, Mike Milinkovich now believes that Microsoft is heading for a complete monopoly which might endanger other companies and projects like Eclipse IDE. According to a recent survey by Stack Overflow (via The Register), Eclipse leads the market share for Jakarta EE development and is followed by IntelliJ IDEA and Visual Studio Code.

  • Recap: FOSDEM19

    This year’s FOSDEM (Free and Open source Software Developers’ European Meeting) has been held in in the beautiful city of Brussels (Belgium), as usual, on February 2 & 3, 2019. It was organised by volunteers to promote the widespread use of free and open source software..

    This was my first FOSDEM as a deputy member of the MC, and a fresh member of the Collabora team.

    I will try to give some information about my talks, and share my experience.

  • AT&T, DT, China Telecom throw support behind TM Forum's Open APIs

    The TM Forum announced that AT&T, Deutsche Telekom, Salesforce and China Telecom have signed on in support of its Open APIs.

    Those companies showed their support by signing the TM Forum's Open API Manifesto, which commits them to using the TM Forum's APIs in their products and service offerings as well as in their request-for-proposal (RFP) processes.

    “Open APIs and open source software are at the heart of our network transformation, and we're thrilled at the broader ecosystem that's adopting the same approach,” said AT&T's Chris Rice, senior vice president, network cloud and infrastructure, in a statement. “TM Forum has played a critical role in nurturing this ecosystem, and we're pleased to support their Open API initiative.”

    The new members also agreed to take part in the TM Forum’s Collaboration program to continuously innovate and update the suite of Open APIs. Those APIs are in use by more than 7,000 software developers In over 1,200 companies worldwide

  • Cisco Making its MindMeld Conversational AI Platform Open Source [Ed: Cisco openwashing of mass surveillance listening devices]
  • A Cisco Router Bug Has Massive Global Implications

    THE CISCO 1001-X series router doesn't look much like the one you have in your home. It's bigger and much more expensive, responsible for reliable connectivity at stock exchanges, corporate offices, your local mall, and so on. The devices play a pivotal role at institutions, in other words, including some that deal with hypersensitive information. Now, researchers are disclosing a remote attack that would potentially allow a hacker to take over any 1001-X router and compromise all the data and commands that flow through it.

  • Daily News Roundup: Apple’s App Store Monopoly

    As of late, Apple has been under fire for its App Store practices. Specifically, the fact that it takes a 30% cut of all app sales, causing developers to raise prices, leaving users no other choice but to pay up.

    Yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled iPhone owners could proceed with a suit against Apple for the practice. Since Apple only allows apps to be downloaded directly from its App Store on iOS, the claim is that it has a monopoly over app distribution. It’s an interesting angle because iOS is one of the only (or perhaps the only?) operating systems that works like this. Android, Windows, Linux, and even macOS allow users to install whatever they like outside of any official channels that exist.

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today's howtos

Wine 4.0.2 Released

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine maintenance release 4.0.2 is now available.

  • Wine 4.0.2 Released With 66 Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0.2 is out today as the second stable point release to this year's Wine 4.0 cycle. As is customary for Wine stable point releases, only bug fixes are allowed in while new features come by way of the bi-weekly development releases that will lead up to the Wine 5.0 release in early 2020.

  • The stable Wine 4.0.2 release is now available

    If you prefer to walk on the calmer side of life, the Wine 4.0.2 release has been made available today. As it's just a "maintenance" release, there's no big new features which are reserved for the current 4.xx series currently at 4.14 released on August 17th. With that in mind they noted 66 bugs being marked as solved. These bugs include issues with Worms 2, Warframe, Rogue Squadron 3D, Settlers III, Mass Effect, F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin, The Sims and plenty more.

  • Linux Gaming FINALLY Doesn't SUCK!

28 facts about Linux for its 28th birthday

Nearly three decades ago, Linus Torvalds sent the email announcing Linux, a free operating system that was "just a hobby" and not "big and professional like GNU." It's fair to say that Linux has had an enormous influence on technology and the world in general in the 28 years since Torvalds announced it. Most people already know the "origin story" of Linux, though. Here's 28 things about Linux (the kernel and larger ecosystem) you may not already know. 1 - Linux isn't very useful alone, so folks took to creating Linux distributions to bundle user software with it, make it usable and easier to install. The first Linux distribution was Softlanding Linux System (SLS), first released in 1992 and using the .96p4 Linux kernel. You could buy it on 5.25" or 3.5" floppies, or CD-ROM if you were high-tech. If you wanted a GUI, you needed at least 8MB of RAM. 2 - SLS didn't last, but it influenced Slackware Linux, which was first released in 1993 and is still under development today. Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and celebrated its 26th birthday on July 17th this year. 3 - Linux has the largest install base of any general purpose operating system. It powers everything from all 500 of the Top 500 Supercomputers to Android phones, Chomebooks, and all manner of embedded devices and things like the Kindle eBook readers and smart televisions. (Also the laptop used to write this post.) Read more

Quick Guide to The Awesome GNOME Disk Utility

GNOME Disk Utility is an awesome tool to maintain hard disk drives that shipped with Ubuntu. It's called simply "Disks" on start menu on 19.04, anyway. It's able to format hard disks and USB sticks, create and remove partitions, rename partitions, and check disk health. Not only that, it also features writing ISO into disk and vice versa, create ISO image of a disk. This tutorial explains in brief how to use it for 8 purposes. Let's go! Read more