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Intel rolls out Clear Linux Developer Edition

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Linux

Specifically, here's what Intel is bringing to the open-source table.

Clear Linux is a rolling-release Linux distribution. While keeping close to the main Linux kernel, Intel has optimized its release for performance and security on its x86 platforms. While it can be used in all of Linux's usual roles, it's designed for cloud and container use.

The new installer brings Clear Linux into the 21st century. The earlier installer was, to be kind, obsolete. Clear Linux still uses the Intel-specific swupd update and package manager. This is different enough from other Linux distros that it will puzzle many users until they master it.

In the new developer edition, besides giving developers a Linux designed to make the most of Intel hardware, its basic programmer bundles are curated to provide all the relevant developer tools with one installation command, For example, `c-basic` for developing in C, and `containers-basic` for container programmers.

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Intel's Clear Linux OS Gets New Developer Edition And Installer

  • Intel's Clear Linux OS Gets New Developer Edition And Installer

    Intel's primary goal with Clear Linux -- which is built from scratch -- is to provide a rolling release distribution optimized for security and performance. And performance is a the big hook. It's tuned for Intel platforms with optimizations automatically switched on, and those optimizations run through the entire stack. (Take a look at any benchmark results at Phoronix and you'll frequently see Clear Linux beating every other distribution in multiple workloads, and even edging past Windows 10 Pro).

Intel's Clear Linux OS Now Offers Workflows Tailored for Linux

  • Intel's Clear Linux OS Now Offers Workflows Tailored for Linux Developers

    While Clear Linux OS isn't as popular as Ubuntu, Debian, or Arch Linux, it always proved to be a viable and quite fast Linux-based operating system for desktop and server users, offering them the best performance possible on the Intel Architecture. Clear Linux OS follows a rolling-release model where you install once and receive updates forever.

    Clear Linux OS always wanted to be the Linux distribution for developers, but now Intel has announced new images, an updated installer, software store, and forum all dedicated to make its open-source operating system a playground for Linux developers of all sizes, genres, and ages, offering them curated content for the best development efficiency possible.

Intel Unveils Clear Linux OS

Clear Linux From Intel Brings Best Performance On Intel CPUs

  • Clear Linux From Intel Brings Best Performance On Intel CPUs

    When I first came across Clear Linux about two years ago, the information available on the project was limited. It was simply being called Intel’s custom distribution that will offer the best Linux support on Intel hardware in cloud deployments. As developers were also working to add support for Steam, gamers also expected to get a great gaming performance out of it.

    Over the course of the past two years, the Chipzilla kept on improving the hardware support and the overall performance of Clear Linux. In the latest development, at its Open Source Technology Summit, Intel announced the release of Clear Linux Developer Edition. This was the first year Intel opened its private event to customers and the media.

More Intel "marketing"

  • Clear Linux Is Beginning To Make Strides In The Industry From Alibaba To MontaVista

    Of Intel's many open-source projects, taking a central role at this year's Intel Open-Source Technology Summit was Clear Linux. Most Intel open-source efforts mentioned during the event point back to Clear Linux in some capacity and at OSTS2019 we finally heard some of the companies that are beginning to make use of Clear Linux.

    While we have been benchmarking Clear Linux for the past few years nearly since its inception and have most often been mesmerized by its performance, it hasn't been very clear who in the industry makes use of Clear. In fact, the public vision of Clear Linux wasn't entirely clear until this week's event from various sessions and conversations with Intel's leaders.

  • Intel’s Clear Linux + The FOSS Contribution Project | Choose Linux 9

    Practically overnight, Intel’s Clear Linux OS has turned into a distribution worth paying attention to. But is it ready for regular desktop Linux users?

    Plus, Jason goes down yet another awesome rabbit hole with a new project on GitHub aimed at giving back to the Linux and open source community.

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  • Equifax just became the first company to have its outlook downgraded for a cyber attack
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Crazy Compiler Optimizations

Kernel development is always strange. Andrea Parri recently posted a patch to change the order of memory reads during multithreaded operation, such that if one read depended upon the next, the second could not actually occur before the first. The problem with this was that the bug never could actually occur, and the fix made the kernel's behavior less intuitive for developers. Peter Zijlstra, in particular, voted nay to this patch, saying it was impossible to construct a physical system capable of triggering the bug in question. And although Andrea agreed with this, he still felt the bug was worth fixing, if only for its theoretical value. Andrea figured, a bug is a bug is a bug, and they should be fixed. But Peter objected to having the kernel do extra work to handle conditions that could never arise. He said, "what I do object to is a model that's weaker than any possible sane hardware." Will Deacon sided with Peter on this point, saying that the underlying hardware behaved a certain way, and the kernel's current behavior mirrored that way. He remarked, "the majority of developers are writing code with the underlying hardware in mind and so allowing behaviours in the memory model which are counter to how a real machine operates is likely to make things more confusing, rather than simplifying them!" Still, there were some developers who supported Andrea's patch. Alan Stern, in particular, felt that it made sense to fix bugs when they were found, but that it also made sense to include a comment in the code, explaining the default behavior and the rationale behind the fix, even while acknowledging the bug never could be triggered. But, Andrea wasn't interested in forcing his patch through the outstretched hands of objecting developers. He was happy enough to back down, having made his point. It was actually Paul McKenney, who had initially favored Andrea's patch and had considered sending it up to Linus Torvalds for inclusion in the kernel, who identified some of the deeper and more disturbing issues surrounding this whole debate. Apparently, it cuts to the core of the way kernel code is actually compiled into machine language. Read more