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So Long Dual-Booting Windows on a Chromebook: Project Campfire is deprecated

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  • So Long Dual-Booting Windows on a Chromebook: Project Campfire is deprecated
  • So long dual-booting Windows on a Chromebook: Project Campfire is deprecated

    Project Campfire turned up in the Chromium world this past August. The intent was to let a Chromebook boot not just into Chrome OS but directly into another operating system such as Linux or Windows. I thought the latter was a positive outcome since it would allow Chromebooks to natively run Windows desktop apps on a Chromebook, and add value to devices.

  • 'Project Campfire' effort for dual-booting Windows on Chromebooks is shutting down

    Google's "Project Campfire" -- a project to allow Chromebooks to natively run Windows desktop and Linux apps -- is being deprecated before it ever debuted. As noted on AboutChromebooks.com on May 15, code removals from "AltOS" (the more official name of Campfire) are indicative that the project is closed.

    Since December 2018, activity on the Project Campfire front had gone quiet, according to AboutChromebooks.

    If Pixelbooks and other Chromebooks were able to run Windows, users who still want and need Windows to run certain apps would have had a new laptop option available to them.

    Google still would have had to pass Microsoft's hardware certification process for Windows 10 before such a feature could come to market. But throughout much of last year, many thought this development was at least somewhat likely to happen.

  • Windows dual booting no longer looking likely on Pixelbooks

    Just under a year ago, there were signs that Google was modifying the firmware of its Pixelbook laptop to enable dual booting into Windows 10. The firmware was updated to give the Pixelbook the ability to boot into an "Alternative OS" ("AltOS" mode). The work included references to the Windows Hardware Certification Kit (WHCK) and the Windows Hardware Lab Kit (HLK), Microsoft's testing frameworks for Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 respectively.

Google just killed...

And Windows is banned inside Google itself...

  • Google may have just killed Windows on Chrome OS project

    Google’s Chromebooks are already capable of running Android apps and Linux programs, but the Mountain View company was also working on Project Campfire. The initiative aimed to bring Windows to Chromebooks, allowing users to dual-boot between Microsoft’s operating system and Chrome OS.

    Now, a new code commit spotted by ChromeUnboxed has revealed that the so-called Alt OS functionality is likely dead. The commit reveals that several related features are being deprecated, including the Alt OS picker screen (which supposedly lets you choose between Windows and Chrome OS).

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Graphics: Mesa 19.2's Feature Freeze and Display Stream Compression (DSC) for AMD Navi

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    Mesa 19.2 was supposed to be branched marking its feature freeze two weeks ago on 6 August along with the issuing of the first release candidate. That milestone has yet to be crossed but should happen tomorrow. Mesa 19.2 development dragged on for the extra two weeks to allow some extra features to land. Those extra features were metrics/counters support for Intel Iris Gallium3D, CCS_E modifier support, and slice/sub-slice hashing optimizations for Intel -- a big performance win. Now that those blockers have landed, the release process is expected to get underway on Tuesday.

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