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KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Environment Enters Beta with Many Enhancements

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KDE

KDE Plasma 5.16 is a major release that introduces numerous new features and improvements, across many of the built-in apps but also under the hood to make your KDE Plasma experience better, more stable, and more enjoyable. One of the highlights of KDE Plasma 5.16 is the completely revamped notifications system.

It supports a Do Not Disturb mode, richer notifications for file transfers, a more intelligent history with grouping, the ability to display notifications in full-screen applications, and lots of configuration options for users in a revamped and more usable System Settings page.

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KDE Plasma 5.16 Beta: Your Three Week Notification

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Beta: Your Three Week Notification for a More Tidy and Composed Desktop

    Today KDE launches the beta release of Plasma 5.16.

    In this release, many aspects of Plasma have been polished and
    rewritten to provide high consistency and bring new features. There is a completely rewritten notification system supporting Do Not Disturb mode, more intelligent history with grouping, critical notifications in fullscreen apps, improved notifications for file transfer jobs, a much more usable System Settings page to configure everything, and many other things. The System and
    Widget Settings have been refined and worked on by porting code to
    newer Kirigami and Qt technologies and polishing the user interface.
    And of course the VDG and Plasma team effort towards Usability & Productivity
    goal continues, getting feedback on all the papercuts in our software that make your life less
    smooth and fixing them to ensure an intuitive and consistent workflow for your
    daily use.

Coverage by Michael Larabel hours ago

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Beta Released With Many Features

    Plasma 5.16 is the big update bringing the new notification system, various Wayland support improvements including the initial EGLStreams handling, theme enhancements, look-and-feel enhancements, many settings enhancements, WireGuard support, and much more.

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