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Development and Free Software: Python, Scratch, GNU/Linux and Bareos (Backup Archiving Recovery Open Sourced)

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Software
  • Top 12 Python Web Frameworks of 2019 Programmes Should Know
  • Best Free Books to Learn about Scratch

    Scratch is a visual programming language developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. Scratch teaches programming concepts to kids, offering a stepping stone to more complicated programming languages. Coding includes dragging and dropping various code blocks and linking them together like jigsaw pieces to form logical scripts. While the MIT Media Lab designed this language for 8-16 year-old children, it is used by people of all ages.

    Scratch has received many plaudits as an ideal way to introduce kids to computer programming and computational thinking. It’s a fantastic beginner’s language. Scratch is often used to make games, interactive stories, and animations, but it can be used for any purpose. The language uses event-driven programming with multiple active objects. The language helps students to think creatively, reason logically, and work together. The language is frequently used in schools, libraries, community centres, and museums.

    Scratch is released under an open source license. I recommend 7 free books that really help young people master Scratch. These recommended texts are also open source goodness.

  • Introducing The New Librem Chat

    Social good, freedom personal privacy and security are things you take seriously (and probably think everyone else should, too). And maybe you already know that the Librem Chat is part of Librem One, a suite of privacy-protecting, no-tracking apps and services which aim to make the world a better place.

  • Top Android Apps to Remote Control Your Linux Desktop

    Remote Access/Control software is important for convenience and/or emergency purposes because it enables users to control their computer systems from the convenience of their couch, for example.

    Earlier this year, I covered the 10 best TeamViewer alternatives for Linux so today, let’s turn our attention to smartphones as I introduce you to the best remote control Android apps for Linux.

    [...]

    KDE Connect is a free and open source end-to-end TLS encrypted utility for remotely controlling Linux desktops, sharing files and controlling media players over a Wi-Fi connection. With it, you can share files, URLs, and clipboard content between your computer and any app, read SMS notifications and get call alerts.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: Bareos, a Cross-Network, Open-Source Backup Solution

    Bareos (Backup Archiving Recovery Open Sourced) is a cross-network, open-source backup solution that preserves, archives and recovers data from all major operating systems. The Bareos project started 2010 as a Bacula fork and is now being developed under the AGPLv3 license.

    The client/server-based backup solution is actually a set of computer programs (Figure 1) that communicate over the network: the Bareos Director (BD), one or more Storage Dæmons (SD) and the File Dæmons (FD). Due to this modular design, Bareos is scalable—from single computer systems (where all components run on one machine) to large infrastructures with hundreds of computers (even in different geographies).

More in Tux Machines

Samba 4.11

  • Samba 4.11.0 Available for Download
    Samba 4.11 has changed how the AD database is stored on disk. AD users should
    not really be affected by this change when upgrading to 4.11. However, AD
    users should be extremely careful if they need to downgrade from Samba 4.11 to
    an older release.
    
    Samba 4.11 maintains database compatibility with older Samba releases. The
    database will automatically get rewritten in the new 4.11 format when you
    first start the upgraded samba executable.
    
    However, when downgrading from 4.11 you will need to manually downgrade the AD
    database yourself. Note that you will need to do this step before you install
    the downgraded Samba packages. For more details, see:
    https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Downgrading_an_Active_Directory_DC
    
    When either upgrading or downgrading, users should also avoid making any
    database modifications between installing the new Samba packages and starting
    the samba executable.
    
  • Samba 4.11 Released With Much Better Scalability While Disabling SMB1 By Default

    Samba 4.11 is out as the latest big feature update to this SMB/CIFS/AD implementation for offering better Windows interoperability with Linux and other platforms. The changes in Samba 4.11 are aplenty that we are a bit surprised it wasn't called Samba 5.0. Perhaps most exciting is Samba 4.11 having big scalability improvements to the point that it should be able to scale to 100,000+ users.

CPU/GPU/Graphics Stack: AMD EPYC, NVIDIA and Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver

  • AMD EPYC 7H12 Announced As New 280 Watt Processor For High Performance Computing

    From Rome, Italy this afternoon AMD not only announced more than 100 world records have been broken with their new EPYC "Rome" processors, but there is also a new SKU! Meet the EPYC 7H12. The EPYC 7H12 doesn't quite follow the naming convention of the rest of the EPYC Rome line-up announced back in August as it's a special part. The EPYC 7H12 is more akin to Intel's Cascadelake-AP line-up but with more broad availability and just a higher clocked / higher power part as opposed to tacking on extra dies. But it carries the same focus on delivering maximum HPC performance.

  • Nvidia Open Sources Its Deep Learning Compiler

    System architects and software teams now have the complete source for the fully open software and hardware inference platform.

  • NVIDIA Bringing Up Open-Source Volta GPU Support For Their Xavier SoC

    While NVIDIA doesn't contribute much open-source Linux driver code as it concerns their desktop GPUs (though they have been ramping up documentation), when it comes to Tegra/embedded is where they have contributed improvements and new hardware support to Nouveau and associated driver code in the past several years. NVIDIA's open-source Tegra/embedded contributions come as a result of customer demand/requirements. Their latest work is preparing to finally bring-up the "GV11B" Volta graphics found within last year's Tegra Xavier SoC.

  • Valve's ACO Shader Compiler Under Review For The Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver

    The RADV "ACO" shader compiler announced by Valve back in July for the fastest compilation speeds and best possible code generation may soon be hitting mainline Mesa for the open-source AMD Linux graphics stack. The ACO shader compiler as an alternative to the existing AMDGPU LLVM shader compiler back-end has shown quite promising results for Linux games. ACO has become more featureful over time and is now largely at feature parity to the existing shader compilation support while generally offering some performance advantages, thanks to the effort and funding by Valve.

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly, Python Shows and Noodlings

  • FLOSS Weekly 547: OggCamp

    OggCamp is an unconference celebrating Free Culture, Free and Open Source Software, hardware hacking, digital rights, and all manner of collaborative cultural activities and is committed to creating a conference that is as inclusive as possible.

  • Talk Python to Me: #230 Python in digital humanities research

    You've often heard me talk about Python as a superpower. It can amplify whatever you're interested in or what you have specialized in for your career. This episode is an amazing example of this. You'll meet Cornelis van Lit. He is a scholar of medieval Islamic philosophy and woks at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. What he is doing with Python is pretty amazing.

  • Cultivating The Python Community In Argentina

    The Python community in Argentina is large and active, thanks largely to the motivated individuals who manage and organize it. In this episode Facundo Batista explains how he helped to found the Python user group for Argentina and the work that he does to make it accessible and welcoming. He discusses the challenges of encompassing such a large and distributed group, the types of events, resources, and projects that they build, and his own efforts to make information free and available. He is an impressive individual with a substantial list of accomplishments, as well as exhibiting the best of what the global Python community has to offer.

  • Episode #148: The ASGI revolution is upon us!
  • Noodlings | Commander X16, BDLL and openSUSE News

    The mission of the computer. Similar to the Commodore 64 but made with off the shelf components. As far as the architecture goes, it is actually closer to the VIC-20 on board design but far, far more capable. I am rarely excited about new things, I like my old computers and really existing technology. I tend to drag my heels at the very thought of getting something new. This, for whatever reason gets me excited and I can’t exactly put my finger on it. This all started out as a kind of pondering in 2018 and in February 2019 with a video from David Murray, the 8-bit Guy’s Dream Computer. the discussion started by the 8-bit Guy The initial design started with the Gameduino for the video chip which had some technical hurdles and was based on an obsolete, as in, no longer supported, chip that doesn’t have a large pool of developers and hackers working on it. After some discussions and planning, it was decided to base it largely off of the VIC-20 as most of the chips are still available today and it is a known working design. Some of the changes would be a faster processor, better video and better sound components.

Mozilla: The Rust Programming Language and Firefox Releases

  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Upcoming docs.rs changes

    On September 30th breaking changes will be deployed to the docs.rs build environment. docs.rs is a free service building and hosting documentation for all the crates published on crates.io. It's open source, maintained by the Rustdoc team and operated by the Infrastructure team.

  • Flatulence, Crystals, and Happy Little Accidents

    The recording of my Rust Conf talk on algorithmic art and pen plotters is up on YouTube! [...] I really enjoyed giving this talk, and I think it went well. I want more creative coding, joy, surprise, and silliness in the Rust community. This talk is a small attempt at contributing to that, and I hope folks left inspired.

  • You'll get a new Firefox each month in 2020 as Mozilla speeds up releases

    Mozilla will turn the Firefox crank faster in 2020, releasing a new version of its web browser every four weeks instead of every six. If you're using the browser, the change should deliver new features to you faster since there will be less waiting between when developers build them and when they arrive. "In recent quarters, we've had many requests to take features to market sooner. Feature teams are increasingly working in sprints that align better with shorter release cycles. Considering these factors, it is time we changed our release cadence," Firefox team members Ritu Kothari and Yan Or said in a blog post Tuesday. "Shorter release cycles provide greater flexibility to support product planning and priority changes due to business or market requirements."