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Network security is an ever growing need these days. You never know what you’re going to find when you step out into the wild world of the internet. Luckily we’re all using Ubuntu so we’re much more protected than most of the world, but there still is reason to protect our computers and networks.

For those of you that are not behind a hardware router (if you don’t know this might be you) you definitely want to install a firewall for your system.

Setup a Desktop Firewall with Firestarter : Ubuntu (5.10 / 6.06.1 / 6.10)

And: Using Firestarter


Skype is a little piece of software that lets you make free calls to anyone else on Skype, anywhere in the world. And even though the calls are free, they are really excellent quality. If you and your friends, family or business contacts are using webcams, you can also make free video calls. You can even call landlines and mobile phones at really cheap per minute rates (and there’s no setup or subscription fee).

Install skype in ubuntu

First you need to download the latest .deb package from here using the following command:

Install Skype Instant messenger


As part of my work on Xen I've been playing with Xephyr (a replacement for Xnest). My plan is to use Xen instances for running different versions of desktop environments. You can't just ssh -X to a Xen image and run things. One problem is that some programs such as Firefox do strange things to try and ensure that you only have one instance running. Another problem is with security, the X11 security extensions don't seem to do much good. A quick test indicates that a ssh -X session can't copy the window contents of a ssh -Y session, but can copy the contents of all windows run in the KDE environment. So this extension to X (and the matching ssh support) seem to do little good.

One thing I want to do is to have a Xen image for running Firefox with risky extenstions such as Flash and keep it separate from my main desktop for security and managability.

Xephyr


This article is to guide you thru the installation and system preparation for FreeBSD 6.1. This article is not intended to produce a working system, but is the foundation for the progression to either a desktop system or a server. Once this document has been followed to completion, you may either choose to follow the Server or Workstation documents for your system deployment.

installing_freebsd_6_1


When you install a dual-boot of Ubuntu, one of the frustrating things that you’ll immediately notice is that Ubuntu is now set as the default operating system in the Grub loader. There’s an easy way to switch back to using Windows as the default.

To make this change, you’ll first have to boot into Ubuntu, and then run the following command:


Set Windows as Default OS when Dual Booting Ubuntu


This article is about resizing ext3 partitions without losing data. It shows how to shrink and enlarge existing ext3 partitions and how to merge two ext3 partitions. This can be quite useful if you do not use LVM and you realize that your existing partitioning does not meet your actual needs anymore.

How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data


I have mp3 music file all over my file system. I’d like to move them onto specific directory called /mnt/mp3. So how do you find and move all mp3 files to /mnt/mp3 directory?

Simply use find command. It locates all files and then executes a command to move them to /mnt/mp3 (any other directory).

Finding all .mp3 files and move to new directory from shell prompt


A quick note for anyone wondering how to enable core dumps from within most Linux distributions.

1. First, make sure debug symbol are enabled in your project’s configuration (in configure.ac if you’re using autoconf).

HOWTO enable coredumps


Staying in front of your computer for hours and hours with the default fonts can be a challenge on Linux/Unix. I, for one, can't work properly without the Windows fonts comfort Smile

Having the windows fonts working on Unix systems is fairly easy, but on Red Hat-based operating systems such as CentOS or Fedora, can be a real nightmare. The most critical aspect of having the Microsoft fonts to display properly on CentOS in compiling freetype with bytecode interpreter enabled. Let's go through this procedure.

How to display Microsoft fonts like in Windows in CentOS?


More in Tux Machines

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more

Server: Red Hat, Security, Samba, Docker, Microsoft Canonical and MongoDB

PocketBeagle and Android

Desktop: AKiTiO Node, Ubuntu Podcast, Vivaldi, Chromium and HUION PenTablet

  • AKiTiO Node: Testing NVIDIA eGPU Support in Ubuntu 17.10
    Ever since the announcement of Intel’s Thunderbolt 3 technology there has been external graphics card (eGPU) support. Unfortunately for most of last year, including with Intel’s own Skull Canyon NUC, putting this solution to use was challenging at best. Most motherboards didn’t fully support the technology and those that did typically required a system that was far more expensive. For example, the Skull Canyon NUC at release was $700, unconfigured. Adding SSDs and RAM usually bumped that up well over $1000.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S10E29 – Adamant Terrible Hammer
    It’s Season Ten Episode Twenty-Nine of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Martin Wimpress, Marius Quabeck, Max Kristen, Rudy and Tiago Carrondo are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • Vivaldi 1.12 Web Browser Debuts with Highly Requested Features, Improvements
    Vivaldi, the Chromium-based web browser designed with the power user in mind, has been recently updated to version 1.12, a release that introduces highly requested features and a whole lot of under-the-hood improvements. There are three big new features implemented in Vivaldi 1.12. The first is a built-in Image Properties feature that works when you right-click on an image on the Web, showing you a bunch of useful information, such as camera model, depth of field, ISO sensitivity, focal length, exposure, histogram, time and date, and white balance.
  • Chromium Will Soon Let You Browse the Web in VR with a Daydream View Headset
    Chromium evangelist François Beaufort posted today on his Google+ profile information regarding the VR (Virtual Reality) capabilities of the open-source web browser, which is the base of Chrome OS and Google Chrome. It would appear that the Chromium team is working on a set of new virtual reality features for the web browser, which means that more VR goodies are coming to popular Chromium-based web browsers like Opera, Vivaldi, and Google Chrome.
  • libinput and the HUION PenTablet devices
    HUION PenTablet devices are graphics tablet devices aimed at artists. These tablets tend to aim for the lower end of the market, driver support is often somewhere between meh and disappointing. The DIGImend project used to take care of them, but with that out of the picture, the bugs bubble up to userspace more often.