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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Helping Developers Succeed with Open Source Languages in 2019: Global Survey Results

    Enterprise CEOs and executives are driving digital transformation to keep pace and lead in their markets. One way to get ahead is to leverage open source, which underpins the majority of today’s software applications.

  • Cthulhu: New open source chaos engineering tool for Java

    Ready to create a little chaos? xMatters newly open sourced their internal chaos engineering tool. Cthulhu helps developers by automating cross-platform software failure testing. It detects failures automatically and self-heals back to a normal state.
    Meet the newly opened sourced chaos engineering tool: Cthulhu. It helps automate cross-platform software failure testing by simulating different scenarios. The digital service team xMatters open sourced this tool on May 14, 2019. It is now available on GitHub under the Apache License for DevOps team to implement into their workflow.

    Chaos engineering is used by teams to simulate disaster in order to test the reliability or security of a piece of software. This method of testing aims to save time and take a proactive approach to solve issues. Perhaps one of the most well-known examples of this mode of testing is Netflix’s internal tool, Chaos Monkey.

    Add some Lovecraftian horror into the mix; let’s take a look at Cthulhu and what it offers.

  • Open Source Testware for Systematic IoT Testing: Eclipse IoT-Testware

    The project Eclipse IoT-Testware is delivering free open-source test tools and programs for the industry and companies developing Internet-of-Things (IoT) solutions. At TestCon Moscow 2019 Axel Rennoch, senior scientist at Fraunhofer FOKUS, spoke about quality assurance for IoT.

    Today and in the future, IoT products and solutions will be omnipresent; they do appear in most of our daily environments at home, in industry, agriculture or traffic situations, said Rennoch. IoT solutions are generally characterized by openness, distribution, dynamics, scaling, and a long service life, argued Rennoch. IoT devices and services should be tested with a focus on conformance, interoperability, robustness, and security.

  • Should IT Professionals Learn to Code?

    Do you have a non-development career in technology? Do you ever ask yourself if it would be worth the time to learn to code? If so, rest assured; the answer is absolutely YES! But what do you have to gain by learning a programming language or two?

  • Codementor: Python's Counter - Part 1
  • New CTO Solidifies npm, Inc.’s Enterprise and Open Source Capabilities
  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (clxxviii) stackoverflow python report
  • RQuantLib 0.4.9: Another small updates

    A new version 0.4.9 of RQuantLib reached CRAN and Debian. It completes the change of some internals of RQuantLib to follow suit to an upstream change in QuantLib. We can now seamlessly switch between shared_ptr<> from Boost and from C++11 – Luigi wrote about the how and why in an excellent blog post that is part of a larger (and also excellent) series of posts on QuantLib internals.

More in Tux Machines

Introducing GNOME Usage’s Storage panel

GNOME Usage is a new GNOME application to visualize system resources such as memory consumption and disk space. It has been developed by Petr Stetka, a high school intern in our Red Hat office in Brno. Petr is an outstanding coder for such a young fellow and has done a great job with Usage! Usage is powered by libgtop, the same library used by GNOME System Monitor. One is not a replacement for the other, they complement our user experience by offering two different use cases: Usage is for the everyday user that wants to check which application is eating their resources, and System Monitor is for the expert that knows a bit of operating system internals and wants more technical information being displayed. Besides, Usage has a bit of Baobab too. It contains a Storage panel that allows for a quick analysis of disk space. Read more

Android Leftovers

4 open source Android apps for writers

While I'm of two minds when it comes to smartphones and tablets, I have to admit they can be useful. Not just for keeping in touch with people or using the web but also to do some work when I'm away from my computer. For me, that work is writing—articles, blog posts, essays for my weekly letter, e-book chapters, and more. I've tried many (probably too many!) writing apps for Android over the years. Some of them were good. Others fell flat. Here are four of my favorite open source Android apps for writers. You might find them as useful as I do. Read more

How a trip to China inspired Endless OS and teaching kids to hack

Last year, I decided to try out Endless OS, a lightweight, Linux-based operating system developed to power inexpensive computers for developing markets. I wrote about installing and setting it up. Endless OS is unique because it uses a read-only root file system managed by OSTree and Flatpak, but the Endless company is unique for its approach to education. Late last year, Endless announced the Hack, a $299 laptop manufactured by Asus that encourages kids to code, and most recently the company revealed The Third Terminal, a group of video games designed to get kids coding while they're having fun. Since I'm so involved in teaching kids to code, I wanted to learn more about Endless Studios, the company behind Endless OS, The Third Terminal, The Endless Mission, a sandbox-style game created in partnership with E-Line Media, and other ventures targeted at expanding digital literacy and agency among children around the world. I reached out to Matt Dalio, Endless' founder, CEO, and chief of product and founder of the China Care Foundation, to ask about Endless and his charitable work supporting orphaned children with special needs in China. Read more