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openSUSE Community Releases Leap 15.1 Version

Today’s release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 brings professional users, entrepreneurs and Independent Software Vendors updated support for modern hardware.

The release of Leap 15.1 improves YaST functionality and the installer.

“Continuity and stability are what we are providing users with Leap 15.1,” said Haris Sehic, a member of the openSUSE community. “With Leap 15, we have introduced a huge number of new features and innovations in security, performance and tool/desktop area. Having in mind how stable, efficient and reliable Leap has become, with this release, we managed to keep the level of quality to the point that our private and Small Business users can, actually more than ever, profit from the enterprise background of an openSUSE Linux Distribution. Let’s continue to have a lot of fun!”

Leap releases are scalable and both the desktop and server are equally important for professional’s workloads, which is reflected in the installation menu as well as the amount of packages Leap offers and hardware it supports. Leap is well suited and prepared for usage as a Virtual Machine (VM) or container guest, allowing professional users to efficiently run network services no matter whether it’s a single server or a data center.

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Also: openSUSE Leap 15.1 Officially Released, Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

OpenSUSE Leap 15.1 Released - Based Off SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

openSUSE Leap 15.1 Linux-based operating system available...

  • openSUSE Leap 15.1 Linux-based operating system available for download

    openSUSE Leap fans, prepare to be excited -- the latest version of your favorite Linux distribution is here! Yes, openSUSE Leap 15.1 can now be downloaded.

    The YaST configuration tool is one of the most significant aspects of openSUSE, and with Leap 15.1, it is getting several improvements. Firewalld gets a new user interface, which will be appreciated by many users, I'm sure. When you need to divvy up the storage space on your hard drive or solid state drive, you will be treated to an enhanced Partitioner tool. YaST will even look prettier on HiDPI screens with this update. There are plenty of non-YaST changes in openSUSE Leap 15.1, of course.

Leap 15.1 just dropped

  • Leap 15.1 just dropped with multiple new features and improvements

    he development team of the famous Linux-based operating system, namely the openSUSE community, has announced the release of Leap 15.1. According to the release notes, the new Leap will provide updated support for modern hardware.

    In addition to that, a member of the Leap community states that the new version is focused on stability and continuity. This gives us a brief idea of what this update offers.

openSUSE Leap 15.1 Released

  • openSUSE Leap 15.1 Released, which is Based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1

    The openSUSE Community announced yesterday (May 22nd 2019) the release of the openSUSE Leap 15.1 Version.

    It’s first minor point release of the openSUSE Leap 15 series and it’s based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 SP1.

    openSUSE Leap 15.1 Supports More Hardware, Drivers, Enhances Installation and improves YaST functionality.

openSUSE Leap 15.1 Is Here

  • openSUSE Leap 15.1 Is Here: Offers Full Linux Experience On Raspberry Pi

    The open source company SUSE is known for its commercial SUSE Linux Enterprise offerings for desktop and server users. The company also sponsors a free and open source community distribution known as openSUSE, which is widely popular among open source enthusiasts across the world.

    openSUSE further offers two releases: Leap follows the fixed release model and Tumbleweed follows the rolling release model. In this article, I’m going to tell you about the latest openSUSE Leap 15.1 stable release that’s based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1.

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