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Fedora Core 6 reaches the 1 million mark in just 74 days

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A mere 74 days after its release, Fedora Core 6 (Zod) has been downloaded over 1 million times, according to the project's leader. That works out to approximately nine downloads per minute for more than 10 weeks straight.

The Fedora team uses Cacti, an open source data-collection and graphing tool, to track and compute the metrics associated with the release's downloads. Cactus tracks the number of unique IP addresses that check in via yum for updates, rather than simply tracking the number of times FC6 was downloaded. According to comments made on the fedora-announce mailing list by Fedora Project Leader Max Spevack, "This metric is much more useful than tracking downloads, because it demonstrates actual 'installed instances' of FC6 that are making a connection back to our servers in search of updated software."

Currently, Cactus manages data only for the Core package and does not track downloads for Fedora Extras or individual packages. Spevack says discussions will be held prior to the release of Fedora 7 and decisions will be made at that time about what additional data will be tracked in future releases.

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Linux-VServer offers a simple way to run several virtual servers on one piece of physical hardware. While it lacks some of the flexibility of more complex virtualization schemes, it is simple to implement and is capable of excellent performance.

Linux-VServer, and similar software like OpenVZ, take a "lightweight" approach to virtualization, essentially segmenting a single Linux kernel environment into virtual machines with separate file systems, process tables, and network addresses.

This is sometimes referred to as a "jail" approach, because it closely resembles a feature called "jails" that is pretty well-known for the FreeBSD operating system. FreeBSD jails are, in turn, an extension of the chroot jail concept, which has long been supported by many UNIX kernels, including the Linux kernel.

Installing Linux-VServer

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