Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Android Leftovers

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 18.04 vs. 20.04 LTS Performance Preview With Intel Xeon Scalable

There is less than one month to go until the official release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS "Focal Fossa" but we've already begun experimenting with it for weeks across a variety of platforms. For the most part we have found Ubuntu 20.04 slated to offer some nice performance improvements, especially if upgrading from the existing LTS series, Ubuntu 18.04. In this article are our initial benchmarks looking at the Intel Xeon Scalable from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS to the current 20.04 near-final state. Read more

Linux 5.6

So I'll admit to vacillating between doing this 5.6 release and doing
another -rc.

This has a bit more changes than I'd like, but they are mostly from
davem's networking fixes pulls, and David feels comfy with them. And I
looked over the diff, and none of it looks scary. It's just slightly
more than I'd have preferred at this stage - not doesn't really seem
worth delaying a release over.

So about half the diff from the final week is network driver fixlets,
and some minor core networking fixes. Another 20% is tooling - mostly
bpf and netfilter selftests (but also some perf work).

The rest is "misc" - mostly random drivers (gpio, rdma, input) and DTS
files. With a smattering of fixes elsewhere (a couple of afs fixes,
some vm fixes, etc).

The shortlog is appended, nothing really looks all that exciting, and
most of the discussions I've seen are already about things for the
next merge window.

Which obviously opens now as of the release, and I'll start doing
pulls tomorrow. I already have a couple of pull requests in pending in
my inbox - thank you.

And while I haven't really seen any real sign of kernel development
being impacted by all the coronavirus activity - I suspect a lot of us
work from home even normally, and my daughter laughed at me and called
me a "social distancing champ" the other day - it may be worth just
mentioning: I think we're all reading the news and slightly
distracted.  I'm currently going by the assumption that we'll have a
fairly normal 5.7 release, and there doesn't seem to be any signs
saying otherwise, but hey, people may have better-than-usual reasons
for missing the merge window. Let me know if you know of some
subsystem that ends up being affected.

So we'll play it by ear and see what happens. It's not like the merge
window is more important than your health, or the health of people
around you.

                  Linus
Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

'Open' Surveillance 'Apps'

  • Singapore to open-source national Coronavirus encounter-tracing app and the Bluetooth research behind it

    The app, named TraceTogether and its government is urging citizens to run so that if they encounter a Coronavirus carrier, it’s easier to trace who else may have been exposed to the virus. With that info in hand, health authorities are better-informed about who needs to go into quarantine and can focus their resources on those who most need assistance. The app is opt-in and doesn’t track users through space, instead recording who you have encountered. To do so, it requires Bluetooth and location services to be turned on when another phone running the app comes into range exchanges four nuggets of information - a timestamp, Bluetooth signal strength, the phone’s model, and a temporary identifier or device nickname. While location services are required, the app doesn't track users, instead helping to calculate distances between them.

  • Singapore says it will make its contact tracing tech freely available to developers

    Less than a week after launching an app to track potential exposure to the coronavirus, Singapore is making the technology freely available to developers worldwide. The city-state rolled out an app called TraceTogether on March 20 and described it as a supplementary tool for its contact tracing efforts that relied on the recall and memory of infected individuals. Contact tracing is the process of identifying those with close contact with infected patients.

  • Over 600k users installed TraceTogether, app to be made open source

    A mobile application developed by the Government Technology Agency (GovTech) that helps in contact tracing for Covid-19 has been installed by more than 620,000 users since its launch last Friday. With a decision to make the technology behind it available to developers around the world, even more people could stand to benefit. Developed in collaboration with the Health Ministry (MOH), the TraceTogether mobile app works by exchanging short-distance Bluetooth signals between phones.

  • 620,000 people installed TraceTogether in 3 days, S’pore’s open source contact tracing app

    TraceTogether, a mobile app to support contact tracing efforts developed by the Government Technology Agency (GovTech), in collaboration with the Ministry of Health (MOH), was launched on Friday, Mar. 20.

  • The Shield: the open source Israeli Government app which warns of Coronavirus exposure
  • Israel Unveils Open Source App to Warn Users of Coronavirus Cases

    A new Israeli app can instantly tell users if they have crossed paths with someone known to have been infected with the coronavirus. On Sunday, the country’s health ministry unveiled the app, called “The Shield”(“HaMagen”, in Hebrew.) The app takes location data from the user’s phone and compares it with the information in Health Ministry servers regarding the location histories of confirmed cases during the 14 days before their diagnosis.