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Games: Lutris on Debian 10 Buster, CreatorCrate and More

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Gaming
  • How to Install Lutris on Debian 10 Buster
  • The Bard's Tale IV: Barrows Deep to launch on Linux "late summer", no Bard’s Tale Trilogy due to Steam Play

    We have both good and bad news to share this morning, as inXile entertainment have given an update on both The Bard's Tale IV: Barrows Deep and The Bard's Tale Trilogy.

    In their most recent Kickstarter update, inXile have said that progress on the massive Director’s Cut update for Barrows Deep is going really well. They said Microsoft has been a "truly amazing partner" giving them extra resources allowing them to take their time. As for the release, they're now saying it will be in "late summer" which will include the long-delayed Linux version. Hopefully those who backed it will enjoy it but it must be annoying waiting almost a year since the release for official Linux support.

  • CreatorCrate, a unique roguelike 2D platformer made on Linux is looking for funding

    Jori Ryan of CreatorCrateGames emailed about their roguelike 2D platformer CreatorCrate. It's being developed on Linux (primarily on Manjaro) and so they're aiming for same-day Linux support with it.

    They just recently put up a Kickstarter campaign, with a pretty low goal of only $5K. They say the funds are to allow them to spend time ensuring it reaches the full potential possible. They've already worked on the game for four years (two of which have been full-time) and most of the core gameplay systems are in place.

  • Confessing my continued love of the Steam Controller, a few years after release

    After picking up my own Steam Controller at midnight from GAME on the day of release back in November of 2015, it has become practically the only gamepad I use. To the point that anything else just feels—wrong. To be clear I own a Logitech F310, a DualShock 4, an Xbox One Controller, I've also extensively used an Xbox 360 pad and so many more.

  • Sweet 2D adventure and crafting game 'Forager' just got a nice free update

    Oh no, this is going to be bad for my free time. Forager just got the first major update since release and it sounds great.

  • The slick atmospheric racing platformer 'Distance' just had another free update with new levels

    Distance, one of the best racing platformers (seriously, I love it) just had another update with Refract giving it more free content.

    The "Electric Update" was released yesterday which gives you six new levels to try out, a new Main Menu level "Ambient", new music, some remastered music for Nexus (Resonance, Deterrance, and Terminus), new options for SpeedRunners like a timer, improvements to the built-in level editor including 17 new textures and bug fixes.

More in Tux Machines

Review of Arch Linux-based Manjaro 18.1 and Zstd in Arch Linux

  • Review: Manjaro 18.1 "Juhraya"
  • Arch Linux Nears Roll-Out Of Zstd Compressed Packages For Faster Pacman Installs

    The upcoming release of Arch's Pacman 5.2 is bringing support for compressing packages with Zstd which ultimately will provide faster package installs on Arch Linux. Similar to other Linux distributions beginning to make use of Facebook's Zstd (Zstandard) compression algorithm for faster compression/decompression of packages, Arch Linux is doing the same. Their findings mirror that of others in allowing faster compression/decompression performance with a similar compression ratio for binaries to that of XZ.

GNOME Shell Development Updates

  • GNOME Shell + Mutter Begin Landing Graphene Integration

    Graphene is a lightweight library that has been in development by GNOME's Emmanuele Bassi. Graphene -- not to be confused with several other software projects sharing similar names -- is intended as a very lightweight library providing graphics types and their relative API while avoiding any windowing system bits and other functionality with this layer just focused on providing speedy vector operations. Graphene has fast paths for SSE2, ARM NEON, GCC Vector extensions, and other optimizations for optimally dealing with graphic data types like matrices, vectors and points. [...] With part 1, various geometry/point/rectangle/vector Clutter objects are replaced with Graphene code. Ultimately this should provide for better performance around various graphic data type operations while also cleaning up some of GNOME's low-level code in the process. This initial integration is now in place for the initial GNOME 3.35/3.36 series though expect more Graphene improvements to come now that the initial support and dependency are in place.

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 2

    Well, we are starting the 3rd and last day of this hackfest… I’ll write about yesterday, which probably means tomorrow I’ll blog about today :).

  • Gnome-shell Hackfest 2019 – Day 3

    As promised, some late notes on the 3rd and last day of the gnome-shell hackfest, so yesterday!

Graphics: Libdrm, AMDGPU, AR/VR and Gallium3D

  • Libdrm 2.4.100 Released With Bits For Intel Elkhart Lake, Tiger Lake Graphics

    AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák on Wednesday released libdrm 2.4.100 as the newest feature update to this Mesa DRM library. On the AMD front there are a number of RAS tests added, a new amdgpu_cs_query_reset_state2 interface, and other expanded AMDGPU test coverage.

  • AMDGPU GFX9+ Format Modifiers Being Worked On For Better DCC Handling

    RADV Vulkan driver developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen of Google has ventured into kernel space in working on format modifiers support for Vega/GFX9 and newer. This DRM format modifiers support for GFX9+ is being worked on for helping to evaluate when delta color compression (DCC) can be used and any other requirements around that DCC handling. Bas explained, "This is particularly useful to determine if we can use DCC, and whether we need an extra display compatible DCC metadata plane."

  • Free software support for virtual and augmented reality

    A talk at the recent X.Org Developers Conference in Montréal, Canada looked at support for "XR" in free software. XR is an umbrella term that includes both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). In the talk, Joey Ferwerda and Christoph Haag from Collabora gave an overview of XR and the Monado project that provides support for those types of applications. Ferwerda started by defining the term "HMD", which predates VR and AR. It is a head-mounted display, which basically means "taking a screen and some sensors and duct-taping it to your face". All of the devices that are being used for XR are HMDs. They typically include some kind of tracking system to determine the position and orientation of the HMD itself. Multiple different technologies, including inertial measurement units (IMUs), photodiodes, lasers, and cameras, are used to do the tracking depending on the device and its use case. AR is intended to augment the real world with extra information; the user sees the real world around them, but various kinds of status and additional data is tagged to objects or locations in their view of the world. AR is a rather over-hyped technology these days, he said. The general idea is that users would wear glasses that would augment their view in some fashion, but, unfortunately, what most people think of as AR is Pokémon Go. VR uses two screens, one for each eye, to create a 3D world that the user inhabits and can interact with in some fashion. Instead of seeing the real world, the user sees a completely separate world. There are two words that are often used to describe the feel of VR, he said: "presence" and "immersion". That means users are aware of themselves as being part of the VR environment. XR encompasses both. Ferwerda said that he is not really sure what the "X" stands for; he has heard "cross reality" and "mixed reality" for XR. Haag said that "extended reality" was another definition that he had heard.

  • Intel Now Aiming For Gallium3D OpenGL Default For Mesa 20.0

    For the better part of two years now Intel has been working on this new "Iris" Gallium3D driver for supporting Broadwell "Gen8" graphics and newer as the eventual replacement to their long-standing i965 classic driver. With Tiger Lake "Gen12" Xe graphics, it's in fact Iris Gallium3D only. In our testing of Broadwell through the *lakes, this Gallium3D driver has been working out terrific on Mesa 19.2 stable and Mesa 19.3 development. But it looks like Intel is going to play it safe and punt the default change-over to next quarter's Mesa 20.0 cycle.

Embedded system cross-development with Ubuntu Core

There are fundamental differences between developing general-purpose software applications and making software for embedded systems. Embedded systems software runs on resource-constrained hardware, in contrast to general-purpose server or client applications that run on more capable hardware. For this reason, embedded system software is not directly developed on the electronic board it will run on – referred to as the target. It is rather developed on a computer – the host – that has a higher computational capacity than the target board. Read more