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Huawei’s “Oak OS” may arrive as early as August

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Android

Google, meanwhile, has warned the US government of potential security risks regarding the blacklisting of Huawei. Apparently, the web giant is worried that Huawei will roll out an OS that would be less secure than Android. Huawei’s system is likely to have more bugs in it than Android, making its phones more susceptible to hacks. “Our focus is protecting the security of Google users on the millions of existing Huawei handsets in the US and around the world,” Financial Times quoted Google as saying.

The Oak OS will be an Android-based system (via the Android Open Source Project). While most of the existing Android apps should be compatible with the new OS, it won’t have the access to Google Play Store. Of course Huawei have its own app store, but can it bring all apps from the Play Store to its store is something to look forward to. Reportedly, Facebook is stopping Huawei from pre-installing its apps on the company’s upcoming phones, further compounding its problems.

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Huawei developing its own Android alternative called Oak OS

  • Huawei developing its own Android alternative called Oak OS

    US crackdown on Huawei has forced the Chinese technology company to develop its own alternative to Android called 'Oak OS'. In a tweet, Global Times said that Huawei has begun testing its own OS. The report suggested that Huawei is testing two variants of its operating system - one for the Chinese market called "HongMeng OS" and the other for the global market called, "Oak OS". It was earlier reported that the international version of the Huawei's mobile OS will be called ArkOS.

Huawei's Android replacement is called Oak OS but looks like iOS

  • Huawei's Android replacement is called Oak OS but looks like iOS

    Further details about Huawei’s Android replacement OS have leaked, including screenshots and a release timeframe.

    Chinese newspaper Global Times reports Huawei’s OS will be called ‘HongMeng’ locally and ‘Oak’ in overseas markets.

    Here are some typically blurry photos of Huawei’s OS...

Huawei Mate 30 Could Launch New Android-Compatible OS

  • Huawei Mate 30 Could Launch New Android-Compatible OS -- What You Need To Know

    The fact that under-fire Huawei is developing its own alternative to the Android smartphone OS is in itself no longer news. With Google suspending future support for Android software and services, the Shenzhen manufacturer needs a stable software foundation on which to base its future smartphones. The new "operating system, to be named 'HongMeng OS' in China or 'Oak OS' in overseas markets, is likely to be launched in August or September," reported China's Global Times, citing sources. If correct, the timing suggests the new OS would launch alongside Huawei's new Mate 30 series of phones.

Huawei's HongMeng OS 60% faster than Android: reports

  • Huawei's HongMeng OS 60% faster than Android: reports

    China's Huawei is reportedly intensively testing its proprietary operating system (OS) HongMeng with internet giants and domestic smartphone vendors, and the new system will be launched in the next few months.

    Technology companies like Tencent have teamed up with employees of Huawei who are in charge of EMUI, a custom mobile OS based on Android that Huawei uses on most Huawei and Honor-branded smartphones to test the new HongMeng OS, according to media reports.

    Smartphone vendors such as OPPO and VIVO have also sent teams to test the new system, which was shown as being 60 percent faster than the Android system.

Huawei's alternative OS said to be faster than Android

  • Huawei's alternative OS said to be faster than Android, attracting the attention of other vendors

    When the US restricted companies from working with Huawei - seen by many as part of the on-going trade war with China - one of the big names that surfaced was Google. With a potential ban on future access to Android, attention swung to Huawei's plan B - its own operating system.

    In a report from Global Times, an English Language newspaper in China, Huawei's HongMeng OS - possibly to be called Ark OS when it comes to market - has been demonstrated and shown to be 60 per cent faster than Android.

    We'd take this figure with a pinch of salt: there's nothing to qualify how that speed is measured and exactly what that might mean in real world terms.

Huawei has reportedly been

  • Huawei has reportedly been working on its Android rival for seven years

    Huawei reportedly wanted to create a backup plan should it ever be banned from using Android. In May, the Commerce Department added Huawei and 68 other companies to an export blacklist, which means Huawei can't buy goods from the United States. Google said it would cut ties with Huawei but was granted a 90-day license to continue working with Huawei to make sure devices that already run its software have necessary security updates through Aug. 19.

    The South China Morning Post didn't discuss much about the underlying technology of the new operating system but said it's capable of running Android apps and that Huawei engineers "studied Android and Apple's iOS closely to learn from them." The operating system is designed to run on computers and phones.

Huawei OS reportedly FASTER than Android!

  • Pocketnow Daily: Huawei OS reportedly FASTER than Android! (video)

    According to the Global Times, Tencent, Xiaomi and OPPO are already testing Huawei’s Hongmeng OS and claim that it will be 60% faster, which was also backed up by Richard Yu. However, no substantial evidence has been found on this being true and could just be for PR. We heard that it may launch with the Mate 30 Pro but the report claims the P40 might be a safer bet.

Huawei ‘reveals’ its own Google Android rival called ‘Hongmeng’

  • Huawei ‘reveals’ its own Google Android rival called ‘Hongmeng’ – to dodge Trump’s blacklist

    It means Brits who own Android-Powered Huawei phones – or buy Huawei phones in the future – could find themselves using a brand new phone system.

    It's likely, but not confirmed, that the Hongmeng OS would be similar to Android, to make the transition easier for users.

    Huawei registered a patented trademark for Hongmeng OS in China, which is valid until May 2029.

    And Huawei has also registered trademarks in Europe for Huawei Ark OS, Huawei Ark, Ark and Ark OS.

Is Linux Sailfish now an option alongside its own OS?

  • Huawei's Android puzzle: Is Linux Sailfish now an option alongside its own OS?

    The company is developing its own OS plan B, dubbed Hongmeng in China and Ark outside it. But it's also reportedly looking at a Russian-customized OS called Aurora that's based on the Linux Sailfish OS from Finnish firm Jolla.

    Huawei exec Andrew Williamson on Thursday said the company will "presumably" trademark the Hongmeng OS and that Huawei is "in the process of potentially launching a replacement", according to Reuters.

    President Donald Trump last month offered a ray of hope to Huawei, suggesting the ban on doing business with US firms like Google could be solved if China agrees to a new trade deal. The two superpowers are, of course, in the midst of an escalating trade war after the US failed to secure a trade deal with China.

    Williamson said Hongmeng OS would be ready to go in months in the event of a full-blown trade war.

Hongmeng

  • Hongmeng, there's no need to feel down: It's patently obvious this is Huawei's homegrown mobe OS

    Industry talk of the own-brand mobile OS development goes back to 2016, when the Chinese firm was reported to be hiring developers who once worked at Nokia for a "secret phone OS project", at the time seen as a way to fend off Google attempts to further tighten its grip on Android.

    Even The Reg thought it could be a defensive move in case a bolshy Google tried to shut Huawei out... little did anyone suspect that a US government under a president with spun sugar hair would cite national security issues and effectively cause Huawei's Android licence to be pulled once the August exemption expires.

    The UK's Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS), meanwhile, is knee-deep in its Telecoms Supply Chain Review – once slated to be available by "spring 2019" (which The Reg notes ends in exactly eight days), but is now on track for publication "in due course". So, er, any month now. DCMS confirmed to The Reg that when it does eventually land, the report will have been bashed about with the redaction stick because of Britain's own security concerns.

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