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Plasma 5.16 by KDE is Now Available

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KDE

Say hello to Plasma 5.16, a the newest iteration of KDE's desktop environment, chock-a-block with new features and improvements.

Let’s start with Dolphin, Plasma's file and folder manager. It now opens folders you click on in new tabs instead of new windows, keeping everything together. You can try this out by clicking the Home folder icon on your desktop (which will open Dolphin and show the contents of Home), and then clicking the Trash can folder also on your desktop. The Trash can folder will open in a new tab of the existing Dolphin window. You can, of course, choose to open more than one Dolphin window -- after all, it wouldn't be Plasma without options -- but this is a feature that will keep things nice and tidy.

Talking about tidy: check out the new notification system! Not only can you mute notifications altogether with the Do Not Disturb mode, but the system also groups notifications by app. Like this, when you run through the history of past notifications, you can see all the messages from KDE Connect in one category, the download information in another, email alerts in a third, and so on.

Discover, Plasma's software manager, is also cleaner and clearer as it now has two distinct areas for downloading and installing software on the Update page. Besides, when updating, the completion bar now works correctly and the packages disappear from the list as the software manager completes their installation.

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By Marius Nestor shortly after the original

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The KDE Project released today the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment, a major release that adds a plethora of new features and enhancements, along with many improvements to make your Plasma experience more enjoyable and reliable.
    The KDE Plasma 5.16 has been in development for the past few months and it's now the latest version of the acclaimed graphical desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems. It's a major release that introduces several new features, more polishing, and dozens of improvements.

    "For this release, KDE developers have worked hard to polish Plasma to a high gloss. The results of their efforts provide a more consistent experience and bring new features to all Plasma users," reads today's announcement. "We hope you enjoy using Plasma 5.16 as much as we did making it."

KDE Plasma 5.16 Released With A Lot Of Polishing

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Released With A Lot Of Polishing, File Manager Improvements

    KDE Plasma 5.16 is out today as the latest major update to the modern KDE desktop.

    KDE Plasma 5.16.0 brings with it a rewritten notification system, KWin fixes, DPI scaling fixes, NVIDIA EGLStreams support, a NVIDIA CPU usage fix, restoring the option to reboot into the UEFI settings, WireGuard support, Dolphin file manager improvements, and much more.

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Is Now Available for Kubuntu...

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Is Now Available for Kubuntu and Ubuntu 19.04 Users

    KDE Plasma 5.16 launched earlier today as the latest and most advanced version of the acclaimed graphical desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems, adding several new features and enhancements like a totally revamped notifications system, improved System Settings pages, and revamped login, logout, and lock screens.

    The KDE Plasma 5.16 release also brings better support for Wayland when using the Nvidia proprietary graphics drivers, improved networking, a much easier to use Plasma Discover graphical software manager, and a much-improved overall desktop experience with lots of polishing for themes, color schemes, widgets, and the panel.

Kubuntu and Neon

  • Plasma 5.16 for Disco 19.04 available in Backports PPA

    We are pleased to announce that Plasma 5.16, is now available in our backports PPA for Disco 19.04.

    The release announcement detailing the new features and improvements in Plasma 5.16 can be found here

    Released along with this new version of Plasma is an update to KDE Frameworks 5.58. (5.59 will soon be in testing for Eoan 19.10 and may follow in the next few weeks.)

  • KDE neon 5.16 Out

    KDE neon 5.16 is out featuring Plasma 5.16. Download the ISO now or upgrade your installs.

    With Diversity in mind this edition features an Ice Cold themed wallpaper to make those in the southern hemisphere feel included.

Official Release Announcement

  • Release Announcements: Plasma 5.16.0

    Today KDE launches the latest version of its desktop environment, Plasma 5.16.

    For this release, KDE developers have worked hard to polish Plasma to a high gloss. The results of their efforts provide a more consistent experience and bring new features to all Plasma users.

    One of the most obvious changes is the completely rewritten notification system that comes with a Do Not Disturb mode, a more intelligent history which groups notifications together, and critical notifications in fullscreen apps. Besides many other things, it features better notifications for file transfer jobs, and a much more usable System Settings page to configure all notification-related things.

Plasma 5.16 is now available for Disco 19.04 from Backports PPA

  • Plasma 5.16 is now available for Disco 19.04 from Backports PPA

    Plasma 5.16 is now available for Disco 19.04 from Backports PPA

    KDE community have launched the latest version of its desktop environment, Plasma 5.16 on 11 June, 2019.

    At the same time kubuntu developers has announced the Plasma 5.16 is now available from their backports PPA for Disco 19.04.

    Released along with this new version of Plasma is an update to KDE Frameworks 5.58.

KDE Plasma 5.16 Released – And It’s a Big One!

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Released – And It’s a Big One!

    So what’s new? Well, what isn’t!? Plasma 5.16 is chock-full of changes, improvements and little flourishes that, together, create an impressive whole.

    KDE devs say they “…worked hard to polish Plasma to a high gloss. The results […] provide a more consistent experience and bring new features to all Plasma users.”

    And based on the surfeit of screenshots they’ve provided, i’d dare say they succeeded!

    Chances are you want to learn more, so let’s dive in!

KDE Plasma 5.16 Brings Glossy Improvements

  • KDE Plasma 5.16 Brings Glossy Improvements

    KDE announced the release of its desktop environment, Plasma 5.16. This major release brings some important changes in user interface, widgets, notifications and many areas. KDE Plasma was in development for past few months and as a result of that we have the glossy and shiny Plasma 5.16 desktop environment.

    “For this release, KDE developers have worked hard to polish Plasma to a high gloss. The results of their efforts provide a more consistent experience and bring new features to all Plasma users. We hope you enjoy using Plasma 5.16 as much as we did making it.” – as quoted from the official announcement.

What is new in KDE Plasma 5.16

June installment of KDE Plasma5 for Slackware, includes Plasma 5

  • June installment of KDE Plasma5 for Slackware, includes Plasma 5.16

    Sometimes, stuff just works without getting into kinks. That’s how I would like to describe the June release of Plasma5 for Slackware, KDE-5_19.06.

    I built new Plasma5 packages in less than two days. I did not run into build issues, there was no need for a bug hunt. The Ryzen compiled and compiled, and then the power went out in the building today… but still, moments ago I uploaded KDE-5_19.06 to my ‘ktown‘ repository. As always, these packages are meant to be installed on a full installation of Slackware-current which has had its KDE4 removed first. These packages will not work on Slackware 14.2.

KDE launches the latest version of its desktop environment

  • KDE launches the latest version of its desktop environment, Plasma 5.16

    Plasma 5.16 comes with a rewritten notification system. With Do Not Disturb mode, you can mute notifications, and the list of previous notifications now shows them grouped by app. Critical notifications appear even when applications are in fullscreen mode.

    In addition, this release adds the much-awaited feature to display notifications for file transfer jobs. System Settings app allows you to configure everything related to notifications.

    Following the footsteps of most of Linux distros development, the standard wallpaper of Plasma 5.16 was chosen for the first time through a competition that everyone could participate and present their original art. The winning wallpaper – the work of an Argentinian talented artist.

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