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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Report: Response to the Consultation on the Government's regulatory proposals regarding consumer Internet of Things (IoT) security

    Open Rights Group (ORG) is a UK-based digital campaigning organisation working to protect fundamental rights to privacy and free speech online. With over 3,000 active supporters, we are a grassroots organisation with local groups across the UK.

    We are a project partner to Values and Ethics in Responsible Technology in Europe (VIRT-EU) – a European project funded by the Horizon 2020 program. VIRT-EU’s mission is to foster ethical thinking in IoT development. The following comments stem predominantly from our experience accumulated in the course of that project.

    We address the consultation questions in order below, omitting questions 7, 8 and 9 as these lie outside our remit.

    1. Do you agree that the Government should take powers to regulate on the security of consumer IoT products? If yes, do you agree with the proposed legislative approach?

    We welcome the proposal to create primary legislation to introduce enhanced security for consumers using IoT devices. We also support the approach of making some requirements mandatory in the first instance with a longer strategy.

  • 'This Is a Bombshell': Facial Recognition Data Collected by US Customs Agency Hacked

    "This is a bombshell," said Evan Greer, deputy director of the advocacy group Fight fight for the Future, in response to the reporting. "Even if you 100% trust the US government with your biometric information (which you shouldn't) this is a reminder that once your face is scanned and stored in a database, it's easily shared across government agencies, stolen by hackers, other governments, etc."

    Buzzfeed, also among the first to report on the breach on Monday, noted that the "cyberattack comes amid the ongoing rollout of CBP's "biometric entry-exit system," the government initiative to biometrically verify the identities of all travelers crossing US borders." As BuzzFeed News reported Citing earlier reporting, Buzzfeed pointed out that "CBP is scrambling to implement the initiative with the goal of using facial recognition technology on '100 percent of all international passengers,' including American citizens, in the top 20 US airports by 2021."

  • What you need to know about the MDS vulnerability and Red Hat Virtualization

    A new series of vulnerabilities in Intel processors, known as Microarchitectural Data Sampling, or more simply MDS, was recently made public and Red Hat released information about how the vulnerabilities affect our software and how to protect your organization.

    In the simplest terms, MDS is a vulnerability in Intel processors similar to Spectre and Meltdown; it allows a guest to read protected memory from anywhere on the host or guest. To mitigate the risks exposed by MDS, a combination of updated microcode, updated kernel(s), patches, and administrator action will need to be taken for both the hypervisors and virtual machines in your Red Hat Virtualization deployment. Unlike some similar vulnerabilities, simply disabling SMT and/or hyper-threading is not enough to protect your applications.

  • 5 reasons chaos engineering is indispensable to the CISO

    Security leaders, including the chief information security officer (CISO), are challenged to continuously demonstrate their role within the company's value stream as part of improving security. In doing so, a growing number of security organizations are shifting toward a more "applied security mode," leading many to rethink our traditional practices and question their effectiveness in today's high-velocity, software-driven world.

  • Wireless Security | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure
  • IPFire on AWS: Update to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 132

    Today, we have updated IPFire on AWS to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 132 - the latest official release of IPFire.

    This update brings you the new Intrusion Prevention System out-of-the-box as well as updates to the whole system.

  • Amitabh Bachchan’s Twitter Account “Hacked” And DP Got Changed

More in Tux Machines

Linux commands to display your hardware information

There are many reasons you might need to find out details about your computer hardware. For example, if you need help fixing something and post a plea in an online forum, people will immediately ask you for specifics about your computer. Or, if you want to upgrade your computer, you'll need to know what you have and what you can have. You need to interrogate your computer to discover its specifications. Alternatively, you could open up the box and read the labels on the disks, memory, and other devices. Or you could enter the boot-time panels—the so-called UEFI or BIOS panels. Just hit the proper program function key during the boot process to access them. These two methods give you hardware details but omit software information. Or, you could issue a Linux line command. Wait a minute… that sounds difficult. Why would you do this? Read more

Android Leftovers

BlackWeb 1.2

BlackWeb is a penetration and security testing distribution based on Debian. The project's website presents the distribution's features as follows: BlackWeb is a Linux distribution aimed at advanced penetration testing and security auditing. BlackWeb contains several hundred tools which are geared towards various information security tasks, such as penetration testing, security research, computer forensics and reverse engineering. Starting from an appropriately configured LXDE desktop manager it offers stability and speed. BlackWeb has been designed with the aim of achieving the maximum performance and minimum consumption of resources. There are 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds of BlackWeb available on the distribution's website. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is 2.6GB in size. Booting from the media brings up a menu asking if we would like to try BlackWeb's live desktop, run the installer or run the graphical installer. Taking the live desktop options presents us with a graphical login screen where we can sign in with the username "root" and the password "blackweb". Read more

Feh is a light-weight command-line image viewer for Linux

The default image viewer in most Linux distros is a fine option for many users, but if you want a distraction free alternative, Feh is a good option. Feh's interface is as barebones as it gets as it does not have any toolbars or buttons but is a command line interface application; because of that, it is very light on resources and still easy enough to use even for users who shy away from using the command line whenever possible. Read more