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Programming Leftovers

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  • Firmware Reverse-Engineering Using NSA Software Continues

    Earlier this month we reported on a new Google Summer of Code project making use of NSA software to help with firmware reverse engineering. So far that effort seems to be paying off of using Ghidra.

    Ghidra is the US National Security Agency's open-source project designed to assist in reverse engineering. Ghidra is similar to IDA Pro and other decompilers/disassemblers. The focus of the GSoC 2019 project has been integrating the support to make it suitable as a tool to help with firmware reverse-engineering.

  • Application lifecycle management for container-native development

    Ultimately, developers are expensive, but they are the domain experts in what they build. With development teams often being treated as product teams (who own the entire lifecycle and support of their applications), it becomes imperative that they control the end-to-end process on which they rely to deliver their applications into production. This means decentralizing both the ALM process and the tooling that supports that process. In this article, we’ll explore this approach and look at a couple of implementation scenarios.

  • Teaching algorithmic ethics requires an open approach

    his trend could have profoundly positive impacts on humanity. Consider, for example, the ways in which AI applications have already proven revolutionary in medical diagnosis. But with and alongside the benefits these systems promise are also serious risks, for the growing unchecked use of algorithms in this fashion risks dangerously amplifying inequality and concentrating power in the hands of the few. Other related problems may accompany this, such as the increased commodification of personal information absent consumer protections, or the buildout of digital surveillance infrastructures that are more often than not turned against already marginalized or oppressed populations.

    One of the most promising mechanisms for combating the dangerous encroachment of individual agency and power through algorithms is open education. Policymakers and advisors educated on these ethical technology issues can make informed regulatory decisions, technologists can increase their awareness of the impacts of their designs, and citizens and consumers can adequately understand how algorithmic systems are impacting their everyday lives. Where knowledge is power, education can provide that knowledge.

  • OOP Method Types in Python: @classmethod vs @staticmethod vs Instance Methods
  • Multiple Linear Regression with Python
  • Testing Complex Systems with Maintainable Test Suites
  • Kubernetes Operators Best Practices

    Kubernetes Operators are processes connecting to the master API and watching for events, typically on a limited number of resource types.

    When a relevant event occurs, the operator reacts and performs a specific action. This may be limited to interacting with the master API only, but will often involve performing some action on some other systems (this could be either in cluster or off cluster resources).

More in Tux Machines

CPU/GPU/Graphics Stack: AMD EPYC, NVIDIA and Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver

  • AMD EPYC 7H12 Announced As New 280 Watt Processor For High Performance Computing

    From Rome, Italy this afternoon AMD not only announced more than 100 world records have been broken with their new EPYC "Rome" processors, but there is also a new SKU! Meet the EPYC 7H12. The EPYC 7H12 doesn't quite follow the naming convention of the rest of the EPYC Rome line-up announced back in August as it's a special part. The EPYC 7H12 is more akin to Intel's Cascadelake-AP line-up but with more broad availability and just a higher clocked / higher power part as opposed to tacking on extra dies. But it carries the same focus on delivering maximum HPC performance.

  • Nvidia Open Sources Its Deep Learning Compiler

    System architects and software teams now have the complete source for the fully open software and hardware inference platform.

  • NVIDIA Bringing Up Open-Source Volta GPU Support For Their Xavier SoC

    While NVIDIA doesn't contribute much open-source Linux driver code as it concerns their desktop GPUs (though they have been ramping up documentation), when it comes to Tegra/embedded is where they have contributed improvements and new hardware support to Nouveau and associated driver code in the past several years. NVIDIA's open-source Tegra/embedded contributions come as a result of customer demand/requirements. Their latest work is preparing to finally bring-up the "GV11B" Volta graphics found within last year's Tegra Xavier SoC.

  • Valve's ACO Shader Compiler Under Review For The Mesa Radeon Vulkan Driver

    The RADV "ACO" shader compiler announced by Valve back in July for the fastest compilation speeds and best possible code generation may soon be hitting mainline Mesa for the open-source AMD Linux graphics stack. The ACO shader compiler as an alternative to the existing AMDGPU LLVM shader compiler back-end has shown quite promising results for Linux games. ACO has become more featureful over time and is now largely at feature parity to the existing shader compilation support while generally offering some performance advantages, thanks to the effort and funding by Valve.

Audiocasts/Shows: FLOSS Weekly, Python Shows and Noodlings

  • FLOSS Weekly 547: OggCamp

    OggCamp is an unconference celebrating Free Culture, Free and Open Source Software, hardware hacking, digital rights, and all manner of collaborative cultural activities and is committed to creating a conference that is as inclusive as possible.

  • Talk Python to Me: #230 Python in digital humanities research

    You've often heard me talk about Python as a superpower. It can amplify whatever you're interested in or what you have specialized in for your career. This episode is an amazing example of this. You'll meet Cornelis van Lit. He is a scholar of medieval Islamic philosophy and woks at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. What he is doing with Python is pretty amazing.

  • Cultivating The Python Community In Argentina

    The Python community in Argentina is large and active, thanks largely to the motivated individuals who manage and organize it. In this episode Facundo Batista explains how he helped to found the Python user group for Argentina and the work that he does to make it accessible and welcoming. He discusses the challenges of encompassing such a large and distributed group, the types of events, resources, and projects that they build, and his own efforts to make information free and available. He is an impressive individual with a substantial list of accomplishments, as well as exhibiting the best of what the global Python community has to offer.

  • Episode #148: The ASGI revolution is upon us!
  • Noodlings | Commander X16, BDLL and openSUSE News

    The mission of the computer. Similar to the Commodore 64 but made with off the shelf components. As far as the architecture goes, it is actually closer to the VIC-20 on board design but far, far more capable. I am rarely excited about new things, I like my old computers and really existing technology. I tend to drag my heels at the very thought of getting something new. This, for whatever reason gets me excited and I can’t exactly put my finger on it. This all started out as a kind of pondering in 2018 and in February 2019 with a video from David Murray, the 8-bit Guy’s Dream Computer. the discussion started by the 8-bit Guy The initial design started with the Gameduino for the video chip which had some technical hurdles and was based on an obsolete, as in, no longer supported, chip that doesn’t have a large pool of developers and hackers working on it. After some discussions and planning, it was decided to base it largely off of the VIC-20 as most of the chips are still available today and it is a known working design. Some of the changes would be a faster processor, better video and better sound components.

Mozilla: The Rust Programming Language and Firefox Releases

  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Upcoming docs.rs changes

    On September 30th breaking changes will be deployed to the docs.rs build environment. docs.rs is a free service building and hosting documentation for all the crates published on crates.io. It's open source, maintained by the Rustdoc team and operated by the Infrastructure team.

  • Flatulence, Crystals, and Happy Little Accidents

    The recording of my Rust Conf talk on algorithmic art and pen plotters is up on YouTube! [...] I really enjoyed giving this talk, and I think it went well. I want more creative coding, joy, surprise, and silliness in the Rust community. This talk is a small attempt at contributing to that, and I hope folks left inspired.

  • You'll get a new Firefox each month in 2020 as Mozilla speeds up releases

    Mozilla will turn the Firefox crank faster in 2020, releasing a new version of its web browser every four weeks instead of every six. If you're using the browser, the change should deliver new features to you faster since there will be less waiting between when developers build them and when they arrive. "In recent quarters, we've had many requests to take features to market sooner. Feature teams are increasingly working in sprints that align better with shorter release cycles. Considering these factors, it is time we changed our release cadence," Firefox team members Ritu Kothari and Yan Or said in a blog post Tuesday. "Shorter release cycles provide greater flexibility to support product planning and priority changes due to business or market requirements."

GNU lightning 2.1.3 released!

GNU lightning is a library to aid in making portable programs 
that compile assembly code at run time. 
Development: 
http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/lightning.git 
Download release: 
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/lightning/lightning-2.1.3.tar.gz 
  2.1.3 main features are the new RISC-V port, currently supporting 
only Linux 64 bit, and a major rewrite of the register live and 
unknown state logic, so that a long standing issue with a live 
register not accessed for several consecutive blocks could be 
incorrectly assumed dead. 
The matrix of built and tested environments is: 
aarch64	 Linux (Linaro, Foundation_v8pkg) 
alpha	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7l	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7hl	 Linux (QEMU) 
hppa	 Linux (32 bit, QEMU) 
i686	 Linux and Cygwin 
ia64	 Linux 
mips	 Linux (32 bit) 
powerpc32	Linux 
powerpc64	Linux and AIX 
powerpc64le	Linux 
riscv	 Linux (64 bit, QEMU) 
s390	 Linux (Hercules) 
s390x	 Linux (Hercules) 
sparc	 Linux (QEMU) 
sparc64	 Linux (QEMU) 
x32	 Linux (QEMU) 
x86_64	 Linux and Cygwin 

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