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Events: GStreamer Conference, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, You, Me and IoT Microconferenc

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  • GStreamer Conference 2019 announced to take place in Lyon, France

    The GStreamer project is happy to announce that this year's GStreamer Conference will take place on Thursday-Friday 31 October - 1 November 2019 in Lyon, France.

    You can find more details about the conference on the GStreamer Conference 2019 web site.

    A call for papers will be sent out in due course. Registration will open at a later time. We will announce those and any further updates on the gstreamer-announce mailing list, the website, and on Twitter.

    Talk slots will be available in varying durations from 20 minutes up to 45 minutes. Whatever you're doing or planning to do with GStreamer, we'd like to hear from you!

  • Making Data Mobile In The Cloud Native World: Ori Bendori, Reduxio

    The interview was recorded at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Barcelona.

  • You, Me and IoT Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    integral part of our daily lives, controlling such devices as on/off switches, temperature controls, door and window sensors and so much more. But the technology itself requires a lot of infrastructure and communication frameworks such as Zigbee, OpenHAB and 6LoWPAN. Open source Real-Time embedded operating systems also come into play like Zephyr. A completely open source framework implementation is Greybus that already made it into staging.

Another Summit in Shanghai

  • Join us at the Contributor Summit in Shanghai

    For the second year, we will have a Contributor Summit event the day before KubeCon China in Shanghai. If you already contribute to Kubernetes or would like to contribute, please consider attending and register. The Summit will be held June 24th, at the Shanghai Expo Center (the same location where KubeCon will take place), and will include a Current Contributor Day as well as the New Contributor Workshop and the Documentation Sprints.

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Arc Menu Extension Now Lets You Pin Your Fave Apps to the Sidebar

If you’re a fan of the Arc menu extension for GNOME Shell you may be interested to hear that an update is on the way. A new version of the traditional-style app menu, which is particularly popular with Dash to Panel users, is currently pending approval over the GNOME Extensions website. What does it bring? Personalisation. Arc Menu replaces the full-screen app launcher in GNOME Shell with a more traditional ‘start menu’ design. It’s searchable, has bookmarks for important folders, shortcuts for key system actions, and lets you manage your session. It also lets you browse installed applications based one their category. The whole of the left-hand sidebar is dedicated to this purpose. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, Test and Code, LINUX Unplugged

Security: Mozilla Patch for Firefox and Getting Started with OpenSSL

  • Zero-Day Flaw In Firefox Is Getting Exploited By Hackers; Update Now!
    Mozilla has issued a warning of a zero-day flaw in Firefox browser that is currently being exploited in the wild. But the good news is that an emergency patch has been released for the same so you should update your browser now! The vulnerability was discovered by Google’s Project Zero security team...
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    A type confusion vulnerability can occur when manipulating JavaScript objects due to issues in Array.pop. This can allow for an exploitable crash. We are aware of targeted attacks in the wild abusing this flaw.
  • Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics
    This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries. The two articles in this series cover—collectively—cryptographic hashes, digital signatures, encryption and decryption, and digital certificates. You can find the code and command-line examples in a ZIP file from my website. Let’s start with a review of the SSL in the OpenSSL name.

Python: Leading, Developing for Android and New RCs

  • Leading in the Python community
    Naomi began her career in the Classics; she earned a PhD in Latin and Ancient Greek with a minor in Indo-European Linguistics, as she says, "several decades ago." While teaching Latin at a private school, she began tinkering with computers, learning to code and to take machines apart to do upgrades and repairs. She started working with open source software in 1995 with Yggdrasil Linux and helped launch the Fort Wayne, Indiana, Linux User Group.
  • What’s the Best Language for Android App Developers: Java or Python?
    Few things can be so divisive among developers as their choice of programming languages. Developers will promote one over the other, often touting their chosen language’s purity, speed, elegance, efficiency, power, portability, compatibility or any number of other features. Android app developers are no exception, with many developers divided between using Java or Python to develop their applications. Let’s look at these two languages and see which is best for Android app developers.
  • Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available
    Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available. 3.7.4rc1 is the release preview of the next maintenance release of Python 3.7, the latest feature release of Python. 3.6.9rc1 is the release preview of the first security-fix release of Python 3.6. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2019-06-28, no code changes are planned between these release candidates and the final releases. These release candidates are intended to give you the opportunity to test the new security and bug fixes in 3.7.4 and security fixes in 3.6.9. We strongly encourage you to test your projects and report issues found to bugs.python.org as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that these are preview releases and, thus, their use is not recommended for production environments.