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The best, until OpenMandriva does better: released OMLx 4.0

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Exciting news!
Shortly after the release candidate we are very proud to introduce you the fruit of so much work, some visible and much more behind the scenes and under the hood.

OpenMandriva Lx is a cutting edge distribution compiled with LLVM/clang, combined with the high level of optimisation used for both code and linking (by enabling LTO, and profile guided optimizations for some key packages where reliable profile data is easy to generate) used in its building.

OMLx 4.0 brings a number of major changes since 3.x release...

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Also: OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Released With AMD Zen Optimized Option, Toolchain Updates

OpenMandriva Lx 4 is finally here!

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Linux distro is here

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Linux distro is here, and there is a special AMD-only version

    Most interestingly, there is a build that is optimized for modern AMD processors only -- it will not work with Intel chips. If you do have an AMD CPU, The OpenMandriva Team claims you will see improved performance by using this version.

    "Hardware support has been improved a lot. In addition to the usual round of driver updates (including the Mesa 19.1.0 graphics stack), OMLx 4.0 now includes complete ports to aarch64 and armv7hnl platforms. A RISC-V port is also in progress, but not yet ready for release. We have also built a version specifically for current AMD processors (Ryzen, ThreadRipper, EPYC) that outperforms the generic version by taking advantage of new features in those processors (this build will not work on generic x86_64 processors)," says The OpenMandriva Team.

OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Stable Release is out now

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 Stable Release is out now and Check what’s new

    OpenMandriva team proudly announced the new release of OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 on 16 June, 2019.

    It is identical to OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 RC, which was released a month ago (12th May, 2019). It’s Code name is Nitrogen.

    OpenMandriva Lx is a Linux distribution forked from Mandriva Linux. OpenMandriva Lx is a cutting edge, desktop-oriented Linux distribution, which is featuring with KDE Plasma as the default desktop environment.

OpenMandriva LX 4.0 Run Through

OpenMandriva Linux 4.0 Operating System Officially Released

  • OpenMandriva Linux 4.0 Operating System Officially Released, Here's What's New

    The OpenMandriva community announced the general availability of the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 operating system, a major release that brings numerous new features, updated components, and lots of improvements.

    After almost two years in development, the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 operating system is finally here and comes with numerous goodies for fans of the popular Linux bistro that continues the sprit of the now deprecated Mandriva and Mandrake Linux operating systems.

    Compiled with LLVM/Clang instead of GCC (GNU Compiler Collection), OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 aims to be a cutting-edge Linux-based operating system that offers some of the highest levels of optimization by enabling LTO in certain packages to make it fast, stable, and reliable at all times.

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