Linux: Accessing Files With O_DIRECT

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Linux

A thread on the lkml began with a query about using O_DIRECT when opening a file. An early white paper written by Andrea Arcangeli [interview] to describe the O_DIRECT patch before it was merged into the 2.4 kernel explains, "with O_DIRECT the kernel will do DMA directly from/to the physical memory pointed [to] by the userspace buffer passed as [a] parameter to the read/write syscalls. So there will be no CPU and memory bandwidth spent in the copies between userspace memory and kernel cache, and there will be no CPU time spent in kernel in the management of the cache (like cache lookups, per-page locks etc..)." Linux creator Linus Torvalds was quick to reply that despite all the claims there is no good reason for mounting files with O_DIRECT, suggesting that interfaces like madvise() and posix_fadvise() should be used instead, "there really is no valid reason for EVER using O_DIRECT. You need a buffer whatever IO you do, and it might as well be the page cache. There are better ways to control the page cache than play games and think that a page cache isn't necessary."

Linus went on to explain,

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